Schroeder DD-501 - History

Schroeder DD-501 - History

Schroeder DD-501

Schroeder(DD-501: dp. 2,050; 1. 376', b. 40', dr. 17'9"; s. 36 k.cpl. 325, a. 5 5", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 10 21" tt.6 dcp., 2 dct.; cl. Fletcher)Schroeder (DD-501) was laid down on 25 June 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company Kearney, N.J.; launched on 11 November 1942, sponsored by Miss Grace Wainwright Schroeder, and commissioned on 1 January 1943, Comdr. J. T. Bowers in command.Schroeder provided escort for two separate carriers making shakedown cruises to the Caribbean and a convoy of merchant ships bound for Casablanca before steaming to the Pacific.After an overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard, she steamed west and joined Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 26 at Pearl Harbor on 28 July 1943. Schroeder assisted in screening the carrier task force which attacked Marcus Island on 1 September. While bombarding Wake Island early the next month, she was taken under fire for the first time but suffered no casualties.After the Wake Island bombardment, Schroeder sailed to the New Hebrides Islands for training with amphibious forces. In early November, she joined the Gilbert Islands invasion force. On the morning of 20 November, Schroeder er was in the bombardment group that shelled the eastern coast of Tarawa Atoll. She entered the lagoon early the next morning to provide fire support to the marines ashore. In addition to fire support, the DD also acted as a first aid ship for wounded marines. Schroeder departed Tarawa on the 24th for Pearl Harbor' for repairs, as she had damaged her screws on a coral reef in the lagoon.Schroeder was back with her division, on 1 February 1944, when it screened transports and provided fire support for the assault on Kwajalein Island. She remained in the Marshalls for several weeks and, from 20 to 24 February, bombarded Maloelap and Wotje Atolls. On 1 March, she sailed to the New Hebrides Islands where she participated in more training exercises.On 20 March, Schroeder and her division bombarded Japanese coast defenses at Kavieng New Ireland, with nearly 900 rounds of ammunition; departing for Efate in the evening.Schroeder loaded ammunition at Espiritu Santo and on 1 April, escorted Pocomoke and S.S. Red Rover to Guadalcanal; joined a merchant convoy there, and escorted it to Milne Bay, New Guinea. Later in the month, she participated in the bombardment of enemy positions at Hollandia; and, then screened transports and LST's at Humboldt Bay. She performed fighter director duties until the 30th when she departed with a convoy for Cape Sudest and, later, to Buna.Schroeder operated in the Purvis Bay—Guadalcanal] area until she departed for Kwajalein, on 4 June, as a unit of Task Group (TG) 53.1. The TG was at Eniwetok on the 28th where Schroeder underwent a period of upkeep and logistics.On 11 July the DD and her division departed for the Mariana Islands. From 16 to 20 July, the division bombarded the Tumon area of Guam. Schroeder then served on picket duty until 4 August when she escorted a convoy back to Eniwetok. After returning to Espiritu Santo for a period of upkeep and logistics, she sailed for Humboldt Bay on 22 August.Schroeder was assigned to TG 77.5 which sortied, on 13 September, for the invasion of Morotai, Netherlands East Indies. She screened LST's in their approach to Pitoe Bay and then served on picket duty until departing for Humboldt Bay on the 21st.The destroyer sailed, on 13 October, with TF 78 for Panoan Island, P.I. She entered Leyte Gulf at midnight, 19 October, with a group of transports, and, the next morning, began performing ASW and fighter director duties. On the 25th, she withdrew from the area and sailed for San Francisco. She arrived there on 23 November and underwent a period of overhaul and availability.On 11 January 1945, Schroeder moved down the coast to San Diego. Departing there on the 20th, the veteran destroyer was back in Ulithi on 7 Februarywhere she joined TF 58, the Fast Carrier Task Force. The task force sortied on 10 February. On the 16th and 17th, the carriers launched attacks against airfields, aircraft factories, and shipping in the Tokyo area. The next day, the flattops launched strikes against the Volcano Islands in preparation for the forthcoming assault against that Japanese bastion.Schroeder returned to Ulithi in early March, but, by the 23d, was again operating off' the Japanese home islands. Detached from the task group on the 31st, she and Murray (DD-576) proceeded to Ulithi. She sailed from there on 10 April as a unit of TG 50.8, which was proceeding to Okinawa to support the landings there. On the 16th, the DD, supporting the landing on Ie Shima, was at general quarters nine different times to repel enemy air attacks. Five days later, Schroeder with DesDiv 49, bombarded the western side of Minami Daito Shima. The bombardment caused many fires ashore but brought no return gunfire from the enemy positions.Schroeder returned to Ulithi, from 27 April to 9 May, for a period of upkeep, replenishment, and recreation. She rejoined the fast carriers three days later as they conducted bombing and photographic missions over Kyushu. Four days later, they supported the troops on southern Okinawa.Task Force 58 entered San Pedro Bay, on 13 June for an upkeep period. It sortied on 1 July, and, on the 10th, the carriers launched sustained strikes against Tokyo. On 17-18 July, strikes were launched against targets in the Tokyo-Yokohama area. On the 31st Schroeder shelled Shimizu, Honshu Island.On 6 September, with hostilities ended, the task force entered Tokyo Bay and dissolved its units. Schroeder was ordered to join TF 11 at Okinawa and proceed to Pearl Harbor. She departed Pearl Harbor on 1 October, with orders assigning her to the east coast. On 2 November 1945, the destroyer entered the Charleston, (S.C.) Navy Yard and prepared for deactivation.Schroeder was decommissioned on 29 April 1946 and placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. She remained in reserve until 1 October 1972 when she was struck from the Navy list. Schroeder was sold to Southern Materials Co., Ltd., New Orleans, La., on 1 January 1974.Schroeder received 10 battle stars for World War II service.


USS Schroeder DD-501 (1942-1972)

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Schroeder provided escort for two separate aircraft carriers making shakedown cruises to the Caribbean and a convoy of merchant ships bound for Casablanca before steaming to the Pacific.

After an overhaul at Mare Island Navy Yard, she steamed west and joined Destroyer Squadron 25 (DesRon 25) at Pearl Harbor on 28 July 1943. Schroeder assisted in screening the carrier task force which attacked Marcus Island on 1 September. While bombarding Wake Island early the next month, she was taken under fire for the first time but suffered no casualties.

After the Wake Island bombardment, Schroeder sailed to the New Hebrides Islands for training with amphibious forces. In early November, she joined the Gilbert Islands invasion force. On the morning of 20 November, Schroeder was in the bombardment group that shelled the eastern coast of Tarawa Atoll. She entered the lagoon early the next morning to provide fire support for the Marines landing on Tarawa. In addition to fire support, the DD also acted as a first aid ship for wounded Marines. Schroeder departed Tarawa on the 24th for Pearl Harbor for repairs, as she had damaged her screws on a coral reef in the lagoon.

Schroeder was back with her division, on 1 February 1944, when it screened transports and provided fire support for the assault on Kwajalein Island. She remained in the Marshalls for several weeks and, from 20 to 24 February, bombarded Maloelap and Wotje Atolls. On 1 March, she sailed to the New Hebrides Islands where she participated in more training exercises.

On 20 March, Schroeder and her division bombarded Japanese coast defenses at Kavieng, New Ireland, with nearly 900 rounds of ammunition departing for Efate in the evening.

Schroeder loaded ammunition at Espiritu Santo and on 1 April, escorted Pocomoke and S.S. Red Rover to Guadalcanal joined a merchant convoy there, and escorted it to Milne Bay, New Guinea. Later in the month, she participated in the bombardment of enemy positions at Hollandia and, then screened transports and LSTs at Humboldt Bay. She performed fighter director duties until the 30th when she departed with a convoy for Cape Sudest and, later, to Buna.

Schroeder operated in the Purvis Bay-Guadalcanal area until she departed for Kwajalein, on 4 June, as a unit of Task Group 53.1 (TG㺵.1). The TG was at Eniwetok on the 28th where Schroeder underwent a period of upkeep and logistics.

On 11 July the DD and her division departed for the Mariana Islands. From 16 to 20 July, the division bombarded the Tumon area of Guam. Schroeder then served on picket duty until 4 August when she escorted a convoy back to Eniwetok. After returning to Espiritu Santo for a period of upkeep and logistics, she sailed for Humboldt Bay on 22 August.

Schroeder was assigned to TG㻍.5 which sortied, on 13 September, for the invasion of Morotai, Netherlands East Indies. She screened LSTs in their approach to Pitoe Bay and then served on picket duty until departing for Humboldt Bay on the 21st.

The destroyer sailed, on 13 October, with TF㻎 for Panoan Island, P.I. She entered Leyte Gulf at midnight, 19 October, with a group of transports, and, the next morning, began performing ASW and fighter director duties. On the 25th, she withdrew from the area and sailed for San Francisco. She arrived there on 23 November and underwent a period of overhaul and availability.

On 11 January 1945, Schroeder moved down the coast to San Diego. Departing there on the 20th, the veteran destroyer was back in Ulithi on 7 February where she joined TF㺺, the Fast Carrier Task Force. The task force sortied on 10 February. On the 16th and 17th, the carriers launched attacks against airfields, aircraft factories, and shipping in the Tokyo area. The next day, the flattops launched strikes against the Volcano Islands in preparation for the forthcoming assault against that Japanese bastion.

Schroeder returned to Ulithi in early March, but, by the 23d, was again operating off the Japanese home islands. Detached from the task group on the 31st, she and Murray proceeded to Ulithi. She sailed from there on 10 April as a unit of TG㺲.8, which was proceeding to Okinawa to support the landings there. On the 16th, the DD, supporting the landing on Ie Shima, was at general quarters nine different times to repel enemy air attacks. Five days later, Schroeder with DesDiv 49, bombarded the western side of Minami Daito Shima. The bombardment caused many fires ashore but brought no return gunfire from the enemy positions.

Schroeder returned to Ulithi, from 27 April to 9 May, for a period of upkeep, replenishment, and recreation. She rejoined the fast carriers three days later as they conducted bombing and photographic missions over Kyūshū. Four days later, they supported the troops on southern Okinawa.

Task Force 58 entered San Pedro Bay, on 13 June for an upkeep period. It sortied on 1 July, and, on the 10 July, the carriers launched sustained strikes against Tokyo. On 17–18 July, strikes were launched against targets in the Tokyo-Yokohama area. On the 31st Schroeder shelled Shimizu, Honshū Island.

On 6 September, with hostilities ended, the task force entered Tokyo Bay and dissolved its units. Schroeder was ordered to join TF㺋 at Okinawa and proceed to Pearl Harbor. She departed Pearl Harbor on 1 October, with orders assigning her to the east coast. On 2 November 1945, the destroyer entered the Charleston Navy Yard, S.C., and prepared for deactivation.

Schroeder was decommissioned on 29 April 1946 and placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. She remained in reserve until 1 October 1972 when she was struck from the Navy List. Schroeder was sold to Southern Materials Co., Ltd., New Orleans, Louisiana, on 1 January 1974.


Schroeder, TX

Schroeder is at the intersection of Farm roads 622 and 2987, fifteen miles from Goliad in northeastern Goliad County. German immigrants began settling the area in the 1840s. Since supplies were available in nearby towns, the first store was not built until 1887. This establishment-which became a combination shoe store, grocery, and saloon by 1892-still supplied groceries, gasoline, and hardware in 1986. A school was built in 1870, a blacksmith shop in 1889, and a cotton gin and gristmill in 1895. The first dance hall was constructed and opened for business in 1890. When a new school was established in 1882 residents named it Germantown School to denote their heritage. Thereafter, the community, which received a post office in 1890, was also called Germantown.

Itinerant clergy used the school for services until St. Luke's Lutheran Church was organized in 1893 by Theodore Ander, the pastor from nearby Hanover (see ANDER, TEXAS). A new church building was built in 1905 with Rev. J. Schroeder as pastor. St. Luke's Ladies Aid Society, organized in 1900, was still active in the community in 1986, as was the Sons of Herman Lodge, chartered in 1894.

In 1918, as a result of anti-German sentiments aroused by World War I, the thirty-five residents of Germantown renamed the community Schroeder, in honor of the first townsman killed in the war, Paul Schroeder. The population decreased to twenty-five by the 1920s. In 1925 a fire destroyed most of the business district, although the community center and dance hall were not damaged. Schroeder rebuilt and reported 150 residents from the 1940s until the late 1960s, when 208 residents were listed. The post office continued until 1944. The school became Schroeder Community Center in 1950. Thereafter children were bussed to Goliad for their education. In 1988 Schroeder still served as a center for a well-populated ranching and farming area and recorded an increase in population to 350. Schroeder Dance Hall remained a popular Saturday night resort. The present structure, dating from the 1920s or earlier, is a landmark where Roy Clark played his first dance, and where Hank Thompson, Jimmy Heap, Ray Price, Mel Tillis, Ernest Tubb, Tammy Wynette, and many others have played. "Schroeder always has been a quiet little place," wrote one journalist in 1979, "except on Saturday nights." In 1990 the population was still 350. The population was 347 in 2000.

Goliad County Historical Commission, The History and Heritage of Goliad County, ed. Jakie L. Pruett and Everett B. Cole (Austin: Eakin, 1983).


L𞲼h sử hoạt động

  • Percival
  • Watson
  • Stevenson
  • Stockton
  • Thorn
  • Turner
  • DD-523 (Chᬊ đặt tên) – DD-525 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-542 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-543 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-548 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  • DD-549 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
  Hải quân Argentina   Hải quân Brasil
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  Hải quân Chile
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  • (Charles J. Badger đư𞸼 Hải quân Chile mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    (nguyên Anthony) (nguyên Ringgold) (nguyên Wadsworth) (nguyên Claxton) (nguyên Dyson) (nguyên Charles Ausburne)
    (nguyên Conner) (nguyên Zerstörer 2) (nguyên Hall) (nguyên Brown) (nguyên Zerstörer 3) (nguyên Aulick) (nguyên Bradford) (nguyên Charrette)
  • (ClaxtonDyson đư𞸼 Hải quân Hy Lạp mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    (nguyên Benham) (nguyên Isherwood)
  • (La ValletteTerry đư𞸼 Hải quân Peru mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    (nguyên Capps) (nguyên David W. Taylor) (nguyên Converse) (nguyên Jarvis) (nguyên McGowan)
    (nguyên Clarence K. Bronson) (nguyên Van Valkenburgh) (nguyên Cogswell) (nguyên Boyd) (nguyên Preston)

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Detached Façade of Schröder

The De Stijl art movement is expressed in the facade. It consists of a collage of planes and lines that detach and seem to glide past one another. These components enable the provision of several balconies and they each have their own form, position and color. The main colors chosen are white and shades of grey. Black windows/doorframes and linear elements in primary colors. The same color palette used on the lines and places flows from outside to inside allowing a small distinction between interior and exterior space.


The History of Schroeder Amplification, Inc and Tim Schroeder

The expedient approach towards a difficult frequency is to remove it altogether. But Timothy Schroeder would rather you enjoy truly full spectrum sound. (This will instantly be your preference as well. Complete utilization of your instrument’s bandwidth is revelatory.) Tim’s amps are masterworks allowing just that: the pulsing, breathing electrical embodiment of devotion to high fidelity living. Your electric guitar, your plugged-in nylon string, even your bowed double bass, is cast in glowing sound-light. An effortless continuation of yourself. The most demanding sonic expectations are exceeded (pesky tones hereby finessed shipshape), letting you create unimpeded.

You’ve read tons of gear origin stories and bios. All of it blurs into an organic/vintage/boutique/mojo-filled soup. Now, we all like soup, though we need to start our recipe from scratch to avoid competing flavors. Tim’s approach retains what’s great about Great Amps in History while being something remarkable and fresh unto itself. We’ll extend the metaphor with Tim’s depth of expertise the stock, fresh ingredients his careful selection of premium components, and the buzz you feel from satisfying seasoning the comprehensive success of Schroederization.

Tim’s fascination with sound and music began in early childhood, becoming full-on obsession in his teen years. From the simple pleasure of plucking strings to analyzing wires on a 4-track tape machine, comparing different vinyl pressings of the same album followed by lots of playing and attentive listening, the foundation for a life maximizing musical potential was built. Columbia College in Chicago for audio engineering was his first professional step, leading to The Apprentice Shop (a Gibson Factory Warranty facility) in Spring Hill, Tennessee, with Tim immersed in everything guitars. After graduation from The Apprentice Shop Tim continued his training under master repairman Gary Brawer in San Francisco. While at the Brawer shop, Tim interacted with the fine guitars of The Grateful Dead, Joe Satriani, Carlos Santana, Steven Stills, and Henry Kaiser, among many others. Late night access to a private studio gave Tim countless hours as a listener, player, and technician among some of the Great Amps: Dumbles, Tweed Fenders, Plexi Marshalls, Trainwrecks.

Returning to his Chicagoland home, Tim opened Schroeder Guitar Repair in 1991. Here he built archtops-that-people-who-don’t-like-archtops-love, influenced by training in Pennsylvania with the esteemed Bob Benedetto. (Approximately 40 Schröder archtops were built, and they are highly sought after now, rarely coming up for resale. The Schroeder Blister Agent distortion pedal and “IT” clean boost/tone enhancer/magicizer fall into this category as well.) Having created an acoustically balanced musical instrument, the missing piece was the amplifier to broadcast the sound. Tim began development of his amps, laying the groundwork for today’s Dozer, Formula 50, and SA9. But sensing the need for change after a highly focused spell, Tim closed his shop, deaccessioning large equipment and moving into a small space in Chicago’s prestigious Fine Arts Building, a hotbed for creative artists of all disciplines. Tim expanded his repertoire to include professional sound engineer and builder of home audio systems and isolation racks. He continued development and repair work for a few years, even entering the realm of high-end kitchen cabinetry until a chance phone call from Fleetwood Mac’s people brought music back to the fore: “We need you to refret Lindsey Buckingham’s guitar and overnight ship it for tomorrow’s gig in Boston.” Lindsey was thrilled job well done, a good check-in, so no more custom kitchens for Tim, rather, back to music full-time (with clients like Rusted Root, Lucinda Williams, and Drive-By Truckers) in the building next to Chicago’s legendary Make’n Music for almost a decade before his current location of Highland Park, Illinois.

Many of the musicians who play Schroeder amplifiers soon find them an indispensable part of their sound live, in the studio, and at home. Jeff Beck, Wilco, Nels Cline, Umphrey’s McGee, Telegraph Canyon, Chauncey & Darrell Marrier, Killick Hinds, Andrew Bird, and many more have been seen and heard ‘round the globe with their Schroeders. Tim prides himself on roadworthy build quality, and a 100% commitment to customer service, with clients becoming friends bound by sound. Schroeder amps make rock, jazz, country, blues, avant-garde– any styles– sparkle. Secrets revealed: while the amps are made for clean warmth and are glorious at low volume, crank ‘em up for superlative thrash metal bite. Protect your ears and hold on tight!

Tim continues to relish the beauty in overlooked sonic detail. On the horizon is more electron sculpting and the release of the wildly expressive Ramjet preamp with its, ahem, “f****d up” design. But don’t let that scare you. Spending time with Tim’s creations is to enter a complete sonic universe whereby your listening capacity and your desire for musical creativity expands exponentially.


Mục lục

Schroeder được đặt lườn tại xưởng đóng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey vào ngày 25 tháng 6 năm 1942. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 11 tháng 11 năm 1942 được đỡ đầu bởi cô Grace Wainwright Schroeder và nhập biên chế vào ngày 1 tháng 1 năm 1943 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân J. T. Bowers.

1943 Sửa đổi

Schroeder thực hiện hai chuyến đi hộ tống cho các tàu sân bay tiến hành chạy thử máy đến vùng biển Caribe cùng một chuyến hộ tống tàu buôn hướng sang Casablanca, Bắc Phi, trước khi lên đường đi sang Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương. Sau khi được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island, nó đi về phía Tây và gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục 25 tại Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 28 tháng 7 năm 1943. Nó tham gia hộ tống lực lượng đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay khi chúng tấn công đảo Marcus vào ngày 1 tháng 9. Đang khi bắn phá đảo Wake vào đầu tháng 10, nó lần đầu tiên chịu đựng hỏa lực bắn trả của đối phương, nhưng không chịu thương vong nào.

Sau đợt bắn phá đảo Wake, Schroeder khởi hành đi đến quần đảo New Hebride để huấn luyện cùng các đơn vị đổ bộ. Đến đầu tháng 11, nó tham gia chiến dịch chiếm đóng quần đảo Gilbert. Vào sáng sớm ngày 20 tháng 11, nó nằm trong thành phần lực lượng bắn phá và đã nả pháo dọc theo bờ biển phía Đông của đảo san hô Tarawa. Nó tiến vào trong vũng biển sáng sớm ngày hôm sau để bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho lực lượng Thủy quân Lục chiến đang đổ bộ lên Tarawa. Ngoài việc hỗ trợ hỏa lực, nó còn hoạt động như một tàu sơ cứu cho binh lính bị thương. Chiếc tàu khu trục bị hư hại chân vịt do va chạm với những rạn san hô trong vũng biển nó rời Tarawa vào ngày 24 tháng 11 để đi Trân Châu Cảng cho việc đại tu sửa chữa.

1944 Sửa đổi

Schroeder quay trở lại đội của nó vào ngày 1 tháng 2 năm 1944, khi nó hộ tống các tàu vận chuyển và bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho cuộc tấn công chiếm đóng Kwajalein. Nó ở lại khu vực quần đảo Marshall trong nhiều tuần, và từ ngày 20 đến ngày 24 tháng 2 đã bắn phá các đảo san hô Maloelap và Wotje. Vào ngày 1 tháng 3, nó lên đường đi quần đảo New Hebride tham gia các đợt thực tập huấn luyện bổ sung. Sang ngày 20 tháng 3, chiếc tàu khu trục cùng đội của nó đã bắn phá các công sự phòng thủ ven biển Nhật Bản tại Kavieng, New Ireland, tiêu phí gần 900 quả đạn pháo 5 inch, trước khi rút lui về Efate lúc chiều tối.

Schroeder được tiếp tế đạn dược tại Espiritu Santo, và vào ngày 1 tháng 4 đã hộ tống Pocomoke và SS Red Rover đi Guadalcanal, tham gia một đoàn tàu buôn tại đây để hộ tống chúng đi đến vịnh Milne, New Guinea. Cuối tháng đó, nó tham gia bắn phá các vị trí của đối phương ở Hollandia rồi hộ tống các tàu vận chuyển và tàu đổ bộ LST tại vịnh Humboldt. Nó làm nhiệm vụ dẫn hướng máy bay chiến đấu cho đến ngày 30 tháng 4, khi nó lên đường cùng một đoàn tàu vận tải đi đến mũi Sudest, và sau đó đến Buna. Chiếc tàu khu trục tiếp tục hoạt động tại khu vực vịnh Purvis - Guadalcanal cho đến khi nó lên đường đi Kwajalein vào ngày 4 tháng 6 trong thành phần Đội đặc nhiệm 53.1. Đơn vị đi đến Eniwetok vào ngày 28 tháng 6, nơi con tàu được bảo trì và tiếp liệu.

Vào ngày 11 tháng 7, Schroeder và đội của nó khởi hành đi sang quần đảo Mariana. Từ ngày 16 đến ngày 20 tháng 7, đơn vị đã bắn phá khu vực Tumon thuộc Guam, và chiếc tàu khu trục sau đó hoạt động cột mốc canh phòng cho đến ngày 4 tháng 8, khi nó hộ tống một đoàn tàu quay trở về Eniwetok. Sau khi quay về Espiritu Santo cho một đợt tiếp liệu và bảo trì, nó lên đường đi sang vịnh Humboldt vào ngày 22 tháng 8. Con tàu được phối thuộc cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 77.5, vốn đã lên đường vào ngày 13 tháng 9 cho cuộc tấn công lên Morotai tại Đông Ấn thuộc Hà Lan. Nó đã hộ tống các tàu đổ bộ LST trên đường tiếp cận vịnh Pitoe, rồi sau đó làm nhiệm vụ cột mốc canh phòng, cho đến khi lên đường hướng đến vịnh Humboldt vào ngày 21 tháng 9.

Schroeder khởi hành vào ngày 13 tháng 10 cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 78 để đi đảo Panoan thuộc quần đảo Philippine. Nó tiến vào vịnh Leyte lúc nữa đêm ngày 19 tháng 10 cùng một đội tàu vận chuyển, và sang sáng ngày hôm sau bắt đầu nhiệm vụ tuần tra chống tàu ngầm và dẫn đường máy bay chiến đấu. Đến ngày 25 tháng 10, con tàu rút lui khỏi khu vực chiến sự để quay về Hoa Kỳ, về đến San Francisco, California vào ngày 23 tháng 11, nơi nó được đại tu.

1945 Sửa đổi

Vào ngày 11 tháng 1 năm 1945, Schroeder di chuyển dọc bờ biển để đến San Diego, California, và khởi hành từ đây vào ngày 20 tháng 1 để quay trở lại Ulithi. Đến nơi vào ngày 7 tháng 2, nó gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 58, lực lượng tàu sân bay nhanh trực thuộc Đệ Ngũ hạm đội. Lực lượng lên đường vào ngày 10 tháng 2 để hướng sang chính quốc Nhật Bản, và vào các ngày 16 và 17 tháng 2, máy bay từ tàu sân bay đã không kích xuống khu vực phụ cận Tokyo, nhắm vào các sân bay, xưởng chế tạo máy bay và tàu bè trong khu vực. Sang ngày hôm sau, các tàu sân bay không kích xuống quần đảo Volcano nhằm chuẩn bị cho cuộc tấn công tiếp theo lên thành trì này của Nhật Bản.

Schroeder quay trở về Ulithi vào đầu tháng 3, để rồi đến ngày 23 tháng 3 lại hoạt động ngoài khơi các đảo chính quốc Nhật Bản. Được cho tách khỏi đội đặc nhiệm vào ngày 31 tháng 3, nó cùng tàu khu trục Murray (DD-576) đi đến Ulithi. Chiếc tàu khu trục khởi hành từ đây vào ngày 10 tháng 4 trong thành phần Đội đặc nhiệm 50.8 để đi sang Okinawa nhằm hỗ trợ cho cuộc đổ bộ tại đây. Vào ngày 16 tháng 4, đang khi hỗ trợ cho cuộc đổ bộ lên Ie Shima, nó phải báo động trực chiến đến chín lần nhằm đánh trả các cuộc không kích của đối phương. Năm ngày sau, nó cùng Đội khu trục 49 tiến hành bắn phá bờ phía Tây của Minami Daito Shima, gây ra nhiều đám cháy trên bờ nhưng không có phát súng bắn trả nào từ các vị trí đối phương.

Schroeder quay trở về Ulithi từ ngày 27 tháng 4 đến ngày 9 tháng 5 để bảo trì, tiếp liệu và nghỉ ngơi, rồi gia nhập cùng các tàu sân bay nhanh ba ngày sau đó khi chúng tiến hành các phi vụ ném bom và trinh sát hình ảnh bên trên đảo Kyūshū. Bốn ngày sau, họ hỗ trợ cho binh lính đổ bộ trên bờ tại phía Nam Okinawa. Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 58 đi vào vịnh San Pedro, Philippines vào ngày 13 tháng 6 để bảo trì, để rồi lại khởi hành vào ngày 1 tháng 7, và đến ngày 10 tháng 7, các tàu sân bay tung ra cuộc không kích xuống khu vực phụ cận Tokyo. Trong các ngày 17-18 tháng 7, máy bay từ tàu sân bay nhắm vào các mục tiêu tại khu vực Tokyo-Yokohama và vào ngày 31 tháng 7, chiếc tàu khu trục đã trực tiếp bắn phá Shimizu trên đảo Honshū.

Sau khi Nhật Bản đầu hàng kết thúc xung đột, lực lượng đặc nhiệm tiến vào vịnh Tokyo vào ngày 6 tháng 9, và các đơn vị phối thuộc bắt đầu được giải tán. Schroeder được lệnh gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 11 tại Okinawa, và lên đường đi Trân Châu Cảng. Con tàu khởi hành từ Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 1 tháng 10 để quay trở về vùng bờ Đông Hoa Kỳ, đi vào Xưởng hải quân Charleston, South Carolina vào ngày 2 tháng 11, và được chuẩn bị để ngừng hoạt động.

Schroeder được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 29 tháng 4 năm 1946 và được đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Đại Tây Dương. Con tàu ở trong thành phần dự bị cho đến ngày 1 tháng 10 năm 1972, khi tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân và lườn tàu được bán cho hãng Southern Materials Co., Ltd. tại New Orleans, Louisiana để tháo dỡ vào ngày 1 tháng 1 năm 1974.

Schroeder được tặng thưởng mười Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Schroeder Hall

Schroeder Hall is a country dance hall located about fifteen miles northeast of Goliad in the rural community of Schroeder in northeast Goliad County. The gathering place is believed to have originated as far back as the 1880s when a combination store and hall was built. Remnants of the original store structure are still present. The current establishment was built in 1935 and consists of a total of 14,000 square feet, including a 6,000-square-foot oak dance floor. The oak was shipped from a mill in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

Longtime owners Byron and Helen Hoff purchased the hall from F. F. Post in 1950. At that time, men paid an admission fee of fifty cents, and women and children received free admission. The dance hall and bar were separate structures. Patrons who wanted to drink beer and watch the dance for free were restricted behind a chicken wire fence separating the hall from their drinking section. Benches lined the dance floor, and a wood stove provided heating.

The venue has hosted a large roster of country music talent. Bob Wills, Willie Nelson, Ray Price, Faron Young, Mel Tillis, Wanda Jackson, Johnny Bush, Tammy Wynette and George Jones, Hank Thompson, Buck Owens, Johnny Rodriguez, Ernest Tubb, and many other artists have performed at Schroeder Hall. Roy Clark recalled playing there when he was a young musician starting out. At that time chicken wire surrounded the bandstand to protect the band from the result of any rowdy behavior. Polka bands, such as the Majeks, also have a long history at Schroeder Hall.

Gradual changes and improvements to the establishment occurred through the years. The Hoffs allowed beer inside the dance hall in 1960 that same year they added tables. In 1969 air-conditioning was installed along with a diesel power plant. For more than forty years the Hoffs also operated a general store connected with the hall but closed that part of the business in 1993.

After her husband’s death in 1989, Helen Hoff continued to operate the hall, which hosted approximately three or four public dances each month, until she sold it by the early 2000s. In 2011 Sharon Kleineke was the owner. The facility included a stage (16 feet by 34 feet in size), as well as an outdoor stage for outside events, and a small saloon and stage for acoustic performances. Schroeder Hall also hosted private receptions, banquets, and reunions in addition to dances and shows by an array of contemporary country artists such as Tommy Elskes, Max Stalling, Stoney LaRue, Paul Eason, Cross Canadian Ragweed, and others. In 2014 Kleineke sold Schroeder Hall to Doug Guller.

John Rivard, “Dance Halls of Texas: Schroeder Hall Near Goliad,” The Texas Polka News, March 1999. Schroeder Hall (http://www.schroederdancehall.com/), accessed August 24, 2015. Geronimo Treviño III, Dance Halls and Last Calls: The History of Texas Country Music (Plano, Texas: Republic of Texas Press, 2002). Victoria Advocate, June 18, 2014.


German meanings for Schroeder and its variations:

- The German word Schröter (Schroetter) is a drayman or brewer's van driver. It is also a type of beetle(source Peter Schroeder). -a Schroder (with dots above the o) was someone who ripped cloth. like a tailor, or shredder.(source Sara Schroeder). -(source Peter Schroeder again) In both cases the name Schroeder (Schrr) probably has some relationship to the modern German noun "Schrot" (coarsely ground or shredded grain or grouts) and the verb "schroten" (to roughly grind grain, to crush, to nibble). The etymology of the word "shred" (acc. to Webster) is the related Middle High German verb "scrotan" or Middle Dutch "schroden," meaning to shred (grain). Someone who ripped up clothe may have been called a "Risser" or "Ritzer", based on the modern German verb "rei෾n." For example, a shredding machine is called a "Reißwolf." The umlaut over the German vowels "a, o, u" indicates a vowel shift that can also be represented by a following "e." In some old German text, the umlaut is actual a little "e" printed over the vowel. In English, we see similar vowel shifts for example the verb "to shrive" and "shrovetide" or "grow" and "grew" -occupational in orgin. Schroeder is derived from the Middle High German verb"schroden" meaning "to cut with scissors" and by extension , the term was applied to a tailor.(Mike Schroeder)

History: Recorded in a bewildering number of spellings, this is an ancient German surname. It is occupational and describes a tailor, and is with Smith or Schmit, perhaps the most popular of all occupational surnames. These spelling forms include Schroder, Schrader, Schroter, Schroeter Shroder, and Shrader, and the surname perhaps not surprisingly, is amongst the earliest to be recorded in the surviving German registers and charters. Surnames from occupations, whilst probably the first to be created, did not usually become hereditary in that age of personal skills, until or unless a son followed his father into the same line of business. If he did not, then the surname tended to die out, until perhaps revived elsewhere. In this case the surname is recorded as early as the 12th century when Rutholf Scrodir, given as being the Burgermeister of Coln (Cologne), appears in the charters in 1135 and 1150, whilst two centuries later Hans Schrader was the Burger of Osterwieck in the year 1364. The fact that these early recordings show that the people concerned were the highest civil authority in their respective cities, indicates the status held.


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