Admiral Thomas Lamison Sprague, 1894-1972

Admiral Thomas Lamison Sprague, 1894-1972

Admiral Thomas Lamison Sprague, 1894-1972

Admiral Thomas Sprague (1894-1972) was an American carrier admiral who had overall command of the escort carriers engaged in the battle of Leyte Gulf, although his namesake Clifton 'Ziggy' Sprague played the more famous role in the battle. Tommy Sprague was two years older than his unrelated namesake, but both men graduated from Annapolis in 1917. Sprague became a naval aviator in 1921.

In June 1940 he became XO of the carrier CVL Ranger. In 1941 he was in charge of fitting out the seaplane tender Pocomole, and then became her commanding officer, operating on anti-submarine warfare duties from Argentia in Newfoundland.

On 3 March 1942 he was given command of the new escort carrier USS Charger, a post he held until December 1942. The first six months of 1943 were spent in staff roles, first as chief of staff to ComFltAir at Quonset Point, Rhode Island and then as chief of staff to ComNavAirLant, based at Norfolk, Virginia.

He returned to see on 16 August 1943, as the commander of the carrier USS Intrepid. He commanded this carrier during the invasion of the Marshall Islands, serving under Rear Admiral Alfred E. Montgomery. On 17 February 1944, while taking part in an anti-shipping raid around Truk, the Intrepid was hit by a torpedo launched by a radar equipped Mitsubishi B5M 'Kate'. The Intrepid suffered heavy damage, but Sprague was able to get her back to San Francisco for repairs (a process so fraught with problems that the carrier became known as the 'Evil I'.

Once back in California Sprague was promoted to rear admiral and given the post of ComFltAir at Alameda, California, a post he held from May-July 1944. He was then given command of Escort Carrier Division 22. He commanded this force during the invasion of the Mariana Islands in August 1944. He was also present at the landings at Morotai on New Guinea (16 September 1944) and on Leyte (20 October 1944).

During the Battle of Leyte Gulf Tommy Sprague commanded the eighteen escort carriers of the 7th Fleet. He also personally commanded the six carriers of Taffy 1. Taffy 2 was commanded by Rear Admiral Felix B. Stump and Taffy 3 by 'Ziggy' Sprague. 'Ziggy' Sprague's carriers were attacked by Admiral Kurita's heavy battleships (Battle of Samar, 25 October 1944). While 'Ziggy' deserves much of the credit for saving his task group from destruction, Tommy Sprague also played a major part in the American victory, directing his other two task groups towards Taffy 3. Under constant pressure from American aircraft and believing that he had won a major victory Kurita withdrew from the fight, missing the chance to inflict a major defeat on the Americans.

At the start of 1945 Tommy Sprague was given command of Carrier Division 3 (Ziggy Sprague got Carrier Division 2). He commanded Carrier Division 3 during the battle of Okinawa, before being given command of Task Group 38.1 in the Fast Carrier Task Force during the heavy raids on Japan that came towards the end of the war.

Late in 1945 Sprague became deputy chief of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, then headed the department from 1947-49. In August 1949 he was promoted to vice admiral and in October 1949 became ComNavAirPac. He retired for the first time as a full admiral in 1952 but was recalled to active duty in 1956 and played a part in negotiations over naval and air bases with the Philippine government.


Naval Academy and World War 1

Born in Lima, Ohio, Sprague graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1917 (although no relation to Admiral Clifton "Ziggy" Sprague, the two both attended the United States Naval Academy later graduating from the same class). He served aboard the USS Cleveland assigned to the trans-Atlantic convoy from June 1917 until April 1918 and, after serving on shore duty for a brief period, Sprague assisted in the official commission of the USS Montgomery in July. As a member of the ship's anti-submarine patrol, Sprague would eventually come to command the destroyer from January to November 1920.


Sprague records on Ancestry

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Contents

Sprague was born in Milford, Connecticut, in 1857 to David Cummings Sprague and Frances Julia King Sprague, a school teacher [3] : 79 His mother died when he was ten, and was sent by his father to live with an aunt in New York. He attended Drury High School in North Adams, Massachusetts, and excelled in mathematics. After graduating high school, Sprague went to Springfield, Massachusetts, to take an entrance exam for West Point, but somehow unexpectedly was taking the four day entrance exam for the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. [4] He got the highest score (twelve others took the exam), and to go to the school he needed to borrow money. A local contractor and a bank loaned him four thousand dollars, and he travelled to Maryland. [3] [ page needed ] There, he graduated seventh (out of thirty-six) in the class of 1878. [5]

United States Navy, inventor Edit

He was commissioned as an ensign in the United States Navy. During his ensuing naval service, he first served on the USS Richmond, then the USS Minnesota. [6] : 95 While in Asia, Sprague wrote stories he filed for the Boston Herald. [3] [ page needed ] While his ship was in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1881, Sprague invented the inverted type of dynamo. After he was transferred to the USS Lancaster, the flagship of the European Squadron, he installed the first electric call-bell system on a United States Navy ship. Sprague took leave to attend the International Exposition of Electricity of 1881 in Paris and the Crystal Palace Exhibition in Sydenham, England in 1882, where he was on the jury of awards for gas engines, dynamos and lamps.

Engineer for Edison Edit

In 1883, Edward H. Johnson, a business associate of Thomas Edison, persuaded Sprague to resign his naval commission to work for Edison. [3] : 81 Sprague, who began at a salary of $2,500, was neither happy with his salary nor his assignments. Sprague wanted to focus on motors, while motors bored Edison, who was consumed in making his incandescent lighting work. Edison sent Sprague to run the construction departments where Edison had built central power stations for his lighting systems in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, and Brockton, Massachusetts. [3] : 85

One of Sprague's significant contributions to the Edison Laboratory at Menlo Park, New Jersey, was the introduction of mathematical methods. Prior to his arrival, Edison conducted many costly trial-and-error experiments. Sprague's approach was to calculate using mathematics the optimum parameters and thus save much needless tinkering. He did important work for Edison, including correcting Edison's system of mains and feeders for central station distribution.

In 1884, he decided his interests in the exploitation of electricity lay elsewhere, and he left Edison to found the Sprague Electric Railway & Motor Company. [6] : 96

Electrical pioneer Edit

By 1886, Sprague's company had introduced two important inventions: a constant-speed, non-sparking motor with fixed brushes, and regenerative braking, [6] : 96 a method of braking that uses the drive motor to return power to the main supply system. His motor was the first to maintain constant speed under varying load. It was immediately popular and was endorsed by Edison as the only practical electric motor available. His regenerative braking system was important in the development of the electric train and the electric elevator.

Electric streetcars Edit

Sprague's inventions included several improvements to designs for systems of electric streetcars collecting electricity from overhead lines. [7] He improved designs for a spring-loaded trolley pole that had been developed in 1885 by Charles Van Depoele, devised a greatly improved mounting for streetcar motors and better gear designs, [7] and proved that regenerative braking was practical. After testing his trolley system in late 1887 and early 1888, Sprague installed the first successful large electric street railway system – the Richmond Union Passenger Railway in Richmond, Virginia, which began passenger operation on February 2, 1888. [4] Long a transportation obstacle, the hills of Richmond included grades of over 10%, and were an excellent proving ground for acceptance of his new technology in other cities, in contrast to the cable cars which climbed the steepest grades of Nob Hill in San Francisco at the time.

By the summer of 1888, Henry M. Whitney of the West End Street Railway in Boston had witnessed the simultaneous startup of multiple streetcars on a single power source and had signed up for conversion. [8] : 10 By January 1889, Boston had its first electric streetcars — which would be the first in the Americas to go underground some eight years later [9] — and which had become so popular and noteworthy that poet Oliver Wendell Holmes composed a verse about the new trolley pole technology, and the sparking contact shoe at its apex: [8] : 10

Within a year, electric power had started to replace more costly horsecars in many cities. By 1889 110 electric railways incorporating Sprague's equipment had been begun or planned on several continents. In 1890, Edison, who manufactured most of Sprague's equipment, bought him out, and Sprague turned his attention to electric elevators. However, he continued to be interested in the use of electricity for urban transportation and proposed a major expansion of London's Underground in 1901. [10]

Sprague's system of electric supply was a great advantage in relation to the first bipolar U-tube overhead lines, in everyday use since 1883 on the Mödling and Hinterbrühl Tram.

Electric elevators Edit

While electrifying the streetcars of Richmond, the increased passenger capacity and speed gave Sprague the notion that similar results could be achieved in vertical transportation — electric elevators. He saw that increasing the capacity of elevator shafts would not only save passengers' time but would also increase the earnings of tall buildings, with height limited by the total floor space taken up in the shaftways by slow hydraulic-powered elevators.

In 1892, Sprague founded the Sprague Electric Elevator Company. [11] Working with Charles R. Pratt he developed the Sprague-Pratt Electric Elevator, the first of which was installed in the Postal Telegraph Building in 1894. [12] The company developed floor control, automatic elevators, acceleration control of car safeties, and a number of freight elevators. The Sprague-Pratt elevator ran faster and with larger loads than hydraulic or steam elevators, and 584 elevators had been installed worldwide. Sprague then sold his company to the Otis Elevator Company in 1895.

Multiple unit train controls Edit

Sprague's experience with elevator controlled him to devise a multiple unit system of electric railway operation, which accelerated the development of electric traction. In the multiple-unit system, each car of the train carries electric traction motors. By means of relays energized by train-line wires, the engineer (or motorman) commands all of the traction motors in the train to act together. For lighter trains there is no need for locomotives, so every car in the train can generate revenue. Where locomotives are used, one person can control all of them.

Sprague's first multiple unit order was from the South Side Elevated Railroad (the first of several elevated railways locally known as the "L") in Chicago, Illinois. This success was quickly followed by substantial multiple-unit contracts in Brooklyn, New York and Boston, Massachusetts.

New York: Grand Central, elevators in skyscrapers Edit

From 1896 to 1900 Sprague served on the Commission for Terminal Electrification of the New York Central Railroad, including the Grand Central Terminal in New York City, where he designed a system of automatic train control to ensure compliance with trackside signals. He founded the Sprague Safety Control & Signal Corporation to develop and build this system. Along with William J. Wilgus, he designed the Wilgus-Sprague bottom contact third rail system used by the railroads leading into Grand Central Terminal. [13]

During World War I, Sprague served on the Naval Consulting Board. Then, in the 1920s, he devised a method for safely running two independent elevators, local and express, in a single shaft, to conserve floor space. He sold this system, along with systems for activating elevator car safety systems when acceleration or speed became too great, to the Westinghouse Company.

Sprague's developments in electric traction let cities grow larger, while his development of the elevator permitted greater concentration in their commercial sections and increased the profitability of commercial buildings. Sprague's inventions over 100 years ago made possible modern light rail and rapid transit systems which still function on the same principles today.

The iconic Sprague-Thomson rolling stock of the Paris Métro, in service from 1908 to 1983, are still referred to as les rames Sprague ("Sprague trainsets") today.

Sprague's engines were used as far afield as Sydney Harbour in Australia. A five-horsepower Lundell electric motor used at the Cockatoo Island Dockyard between 1900 and 1980 is now in the collection of the National Museum of Australia in Canberra. [14]

Sprague was awarded the gold medal In Paris at the International Exposition of Electricity in 1889, [15] the grand prize at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 1904, [15] the Elliott Cresson Medal in 1904, [15] and the Edison Medal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (now Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), for "meritorious achievement in electrical science, engineering and arts as exemplified in his contributions thereto" in 1910. [1]

In addition, he received the Franklin Medal in 1921 and was posthumously awarded the John Fritz Gold Medal in 1935. [15]

Sprague was twice married, first to a Mary Keatinge, [ clarification needed ] and thereafter to Harriet Chapman Jones. [1] Frank and Mary had one son, Frank Desmond. [ who? ] [16] Frank and Harriet had two sons and a daughter: Robert C. Sprague (also an inventor), Julian K. and Frances A. [17] [ citation needed ] Remembering his father, Robert wrote in 1935:

All through his life and up to his last day, Frank Sprague had a prodigious capacity for work… And once having made up his mind on a new invention or a new line of work, he was tireless and always striving for improvement. He had a brilliantly alert mind and was impatient of any half-way compromise. His interest in his work never ceased only a few hours before the end, he asked to have a newly designed model of his latest invention brought to his bedside. [ This quote needs a citation ]


Sprague died on October 25, 1934. [1] He was buried with full U.S. Navy honors at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. [1] [18] His wife Harriet was interred with him after her death in 1969. [19] After Sprague's death, Harriet turned over a substantial amount of material from his collection to the New York Public Library, where it remains today accessible to the public via the rare books division. [20] Other papers, including six volumes of congratulatory letters and photographs presented to Sprague on the occasion of his 75th birthday, is held at the Chapin Library, Williams College. [21]

In 1959, Harriet Sprague donated funds for the Sprague Building at the Shore Line Trolley Museum at East Haven, Connecticut, not far from Sprague's boyhood home in Milford. The museum is the oldest operating trolley museum in the United States and has one of the largest collections of trolley artifacts in the United States.

Robert C. Sprague would go on to found and lead the Sprague Electric Company as its president (1926-1953) and CEO (1953-1987). Bought by Vishay Intertechnology in the 1992, [22] [ better source needed ] it had become a leading manufacturer of capacitors and other electronic components. Frank and Harriet's grandson Peter Sprague, an entrepreneur, would become CEO of National Semiconductor (1965-1995).

In 1999, grandsons, John L. Sprague and Peter Sprague cut the ribbon and started an 1884 Sprague motor at a new exhibit at the Shore Line Trolley Museum, where a permanent exhibit, "Frank J. Sprague: Inventor, Scientist, Engineer", tells the story of the role of the "Father of Electric Traction" and the role of electricity in the growth of cities.

In 2012, the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum adopted a stray cat, naming it after Sprague: Frank the Trolley Cat. [23]

In 2017, Sprague was the subject of a documentary episode, called The Race Underground, on season 29 of American Experience series that premiered on PBS television stations. It partly chronicled the beginnings of the Boston-area MBTA's streetcar network, which described him as "The Forgotten Hero of the American Subway". [24]


Contents

Entries in the following list of four-star admirals are indexed by the numerical order in which each officer was promoted to that rank while on active duty, or by an asterisk (*) if the officer did not serve in that rank while on active duty. Each entry lists the admiral's name, date of rank, Ώ] active-duty positions held while serving at four-star rank, ΐ] number of years of active-duty service at four-star rank (Yrs), Α] year commissioned and source of commission, Β] number of years in commission when promoted to four-star rank (YC), Γ] and other biographical notes. Δ]

The list is sortable by last name, date of rank, number of years of active-duty service at four-star rank, year commissioned, and number of years in commission when promoted to four-star rank.

# Name Date of rank Ώ] Position Yrs Α] Commission Β] YC Γ] Notes
1 farragut ! David G. Farragut 1866-07-25 ! 25 Jul 1866   Admiral of the Navy, 1866� Commander, European Squadron, 1867�. 4 1810 (warrant) 56 (1801�) Brother-by-adoption of Navy four-star admiral David D. Porter Jr.
2 porter ! David D. Porter Jr. 1870-08-15 ! 15 Aug 1870   Admiral of the Navy, 1870� Head, Board of Inspection, 1877�. 21 1829 (warrant) 41 (1813�) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1865�. Brother-by-adoption of Navy four-star admiral David G. Farragut.
3 dewey ! George Dewey 1899-03-02 ! 02 Mar 1899   Commander, Asiatic Station, 1898� President, General Board of the Navy, 1900�. 18 1858 (USNA) 41 (1837�) Promoted to The Admiral of the Navy, 24 Mar 1903, with date of rank 02 Mar 1899. Candidate for Democratic Party nomination for U.S. President, 1900.
4 fletcher ! Frank F. Fletcher 1915-03-10 ! 10 Mar 1915   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1914�. 2 1875 (USNA) 40 (1855�) Ε] Awarded Medal of Honor, 1914. Uncle of Navy four-star admiral Frank J. Fletcher.
5 howard ! Thomas B. Howard 1915-03-11 ! 11 Mar 1915   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 1914�. 1 1873 (USNA) 42 (1854�) Ε] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Observatory, 1917�.
6 cowles ! Walter C. Cowles 1915-03-12 ! 12 Mar 1915   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1914�. 1 1873 (USNA) 42 (1853�) Ε]
7 winterhalter ! Albert G. Winterhalter 1915-07-09 ! 09 Jul 1915   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1915�. 2 1877 (USNA) 42 (1856�) Ε]
8 winslow ! Cameron M. Winslow 1915-09-13 ! 13 Sep 1915   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 1915�. 1 1875 (USNA) 40 (1854�) Ε]
9 mayo ! Henry T. Mayo 1916-06-19 ! 19 Jun 1916   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1916� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1919. 3 1876 (USNA) 41 (1857�) Ε] Ζ] Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1924�.
10 caperton ! William B. Caperton 1916-07-28 ! 28 Jul 1916   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 1916�. 3 1875 (USNA) 41 (1855�) Ε] Ζ] Special Representative of the President in Brazil, 1918.
11 benson ! William S. Benson 1916-08-29 ! 29 Aug 1916   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1915�. 3 1877 (USNA) Η] 39 (1855�) Ε] Ζ] Chairman/Commissioner, U.S. Shipping Board, 1919�.
12 knight ! Austin M. Knight 1917-04-04 ! 04 Apr 1917   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1917�. 1 1873 (USNA) Η] 44 (1854�) Ε] Brother of Seattle Mayor Bertha Knight Landes.
13 sims ! William S. Sims 1918-12-04 ! 04 Dec 1918   Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in European Waters, 1917�. 2 1880 (USNA) Η] 38 (1858�) Ε] Ζ] Awarded Pulitzer Prize for History, 1921.
14 wilson ! Henry B. Wilson Jr. 1919-06-30 ! 30 Jun 1919   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1919�. 2 1881 (USNA) Η] 38 (1861�) Ε] Ζ] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1921�. Father-in-law of U.S. Secretary of War Patrick J. Hurley.
15 rodman ! Hugh Rodman 1919-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1919   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 1919�. 2 1880 (USNA) Η] 39 (1859�) Ε] Ζ] U.S. Minister and Envoy to Peru, 1921.
16 gleaves ! Albert Gleaves 1919-09-01 ! 01 Sep 1919   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1919�. 2 1877 (USNA) Η] 42 (1858�) Ε] Ζ] Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1928�.
17 coontz ! Robert E. Coontz 1919-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1919   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1919� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1923�. 6 1885 (USNA) Η] 34 (1864�) Ε] Ζ] Governor of Guam, 1912�.
18 strauss ! Joseph Strauss 1921-02-04 ! 04 Feb 1921   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1921�. 1 1885 (USNA) Η] 36 (1861�) Ε] Ζ]
19 jones ! Hilary P. Jones 1921-06-30 ! 30 Jun 1921   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1921� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1922�. 2 1884 (USNA) Η] 37 (1865�) Ε] Ζ]
20 eberle ! Edward W. Eberle 1921-07-05 ! 05 Jul 1921   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 1921 Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1921� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1923�. 6 1885 (USNA) Η] 36 (1864�) Ε] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1915�.
21 anderson ! Edwin A. Anderson 1922-08-28 ! 28 Aug 1922   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1922�. 1 1882 (USNA) Η] 40 (1860�) Ε] Awarded Medal of Honor, 1914.
22 robison ! Samuel S. Robison 1923-06-30 ! 30 Jun 1923   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1923� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1925�. 3 1888 (USNA) Η] 35 (1867�) Ε] ⎖] Military Governor of Santo Domingo, 1921� Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1928� Superintendent, Admiral Farragut Academy, 1931�. Brother-in-law of Navy four-star admiral Charles F. Hughes.
23 washington ! Thomas Washington 1923-10-11 ! 11 Oct 1923   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1923�. 2 1887 (USNA) Η] 36 (1865�) Ε] ⎖] Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1931�.
24 hughes ! Charles F. Hughes 1925-10-14-00 ! 14 Oct 1925   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1925� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1926� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1927�. 5 1888 (USNA) Η] 37 (1866�) Ε] Brother-in-law of Navy four-star admiral Samuel S. Robison daughter married brother of Navy five-star admiral Chester W. Nimitz.
25 williams ! Clarence S. Williams 1925-10-14-01 ! 14 Oct 1925   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1925�. 2 1884 (USNA) Η] 41 (1863�) Ε] ⎖]
26 jackson ! Richard H. Jackson 1926-09-04 ! 04 Sep 1926   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1926�. 1 1887 (USNA) Η] 39 (1866�) Ε] ⎖] Distant cousin of Air Force four-star general Charles P. Cabell.
27 wiley ! Henry A. Wiley 1927-09-08 ! 08 Sep 1927   Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1927-1929. 2 1888 (USNA) Η] 39 (1867�) Ε] Chairman/Commissioner, U.S. Maritime Commission, 1936�.
28 bristol ! Mark L. Bristol 1927-09-09 ! 09 Sep 1927   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1927�. 2 1887 (USNA) Η] 40 (1868�) Ε] U.S. High Commissioner, Turkey, 1919�.
29 desteiguer ! Louis R. de Steiguer 1927-09-10 ! 10 Sep 1927   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1927�. 1 1889 (USNA) Η] 38 (1867�) Ε] ⎖]
30 pratt ! William V. Pratt 1928-06-26 ! 26 Jun 1928   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1928� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1929� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1930�. 5 1889 (USNA) Η] 39 (1869�) Ε] ⎗]
31 nulton ! Louis M. Nulton 1929-05-21 ! 21 May 1929   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1929�. 1 1889 (USNA) Η] 40 (1869�) Ε] ⎖] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1925�.
32 mcvay ! Charles B. McVay Jr. 1929-09-09 ! 09 Sep 1929   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1929�. 2 1890 (USNA) Η] 39 (1868�) Ε] ⎖]
33 schofield ! Frank H. Schofield 1930-05-24 ! 24 May 1930   Commander in Chief, U.S. Battle Fleet (COMBATFLT), 1930� Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1931 Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1931�. 2 1890 (USNA) Η] 40 (1869�) Ε]
34 chase ! Jehu V. Chase 1930-09-17 ! 17 Sep 1930   Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1930�. 1 1890 (USNA) Η] 40 (1869�) Ε]
35 taylor ! Montgomery M. Taylor 1931-09-01 ! 01 Sep 1931   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1931�. 2 1890 (USNA) Η] 41 (1869�) Ε] ⎖] Grandnephew of U.S. President Zachary Taylor distant cousin of Army four-star general Montgomery C. Meigs.
36 leigh ! Richard H. Leigh 1931-09-15 ! 15 Sep 1931   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1931� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1932�. 2 1891 (USNA) Η] 40 (1870�) Ε] ⎖]
37 mcnamee ! Luke McNamee 1932-08-11 ! 11 Aug 1932   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1932�. 1 1892 (USNA) Η] 40 (1871�) Ε] ⎖] Governor of Guam, 1907.
38 standley ! William H. Standley 1933-05-20 ! 20 May 1933   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1933 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1933�. 4 1895 (USNA) Η] 38 (1872�) Ε] ⎗] ⎘] U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union, 1942�.
39 sellers ! David F. Sellers 1933-06-10 ! 10 Jun 1933   Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1933�. 1 1894 (USNA) Η] 39 (1874�) Ε] ⎖] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1934�.
40 reeves ! Joseph M. Reeves 1933-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1933   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1933� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1934�. 3 1894 (USNA) Η] 39 (1872�) Ε] ⎖] ⎙]
41 upham ! Frank B. Upham 1933-08-18 ! 18 Aug 1933   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1933�. 2 1893 (USNA) Η] 40 (1872�) Ε] Married aunt of Navy four-star admiral Robert B. Carney.
42 brumby ! Frank H. Brumby 1934-06-15 ! 15 Jun 1934   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1934�. 1 1895 (USNA) Η] 39 (1874�) Ε] ⎖]
43 laning ! Harris Laning 1935-04-01 ! 01 Apr 1935   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1935�. 1 1895 (USNA) Η] 40 (1873�) Ε] Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1937�.
44 murfin ! Orin G. Murfin 1935-10-04 ! 04 Oct 1935   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1935�. 1 1897 (USNA) Η] 38 (1876�) Ε] ⎖]
45 leahy ! William D. Leahy 1936-03-30 ! 30 Mar 1936   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1936� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1937� Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief, Army and Navy, 1942� Special duty, 1949�. 10 1897 (USNA) Η] 39 (1875�) ⎚] Promoted to fleet admiral, 15 Dec 1944. Governor of Puerto Rico, 1939� U.S. Ambassador to France, 1941�. Wife's niece married Navy four-star admiral David W. Bagley.
46 hepburn ! Arthur J. Hepburn 1936-06-24 ! 24 Jun 1936   Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1936�. 2 1897 (USNA) Η] 39 (1877�) Ε] ⎖]
47 yarnell ! Harry E. Yarnell 1936-10-30 ! 30 Oct 1936   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1936�. 3 1897 (USNA) Η] 39 (1875�) Ε] ⎖] ⎛]
48 bloch ! Claude C. Bloch 1937-01-02 ! 02 Jan 1937   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1937� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1938�. 3 1899 (USNA) Η] 38 (1878�) Ε] ⎜]
49 kalbfus ! Edward C. Kalbfus 1938-01-29 ! 29 Jan 1938   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1938�. 1 1899 (USNA) Η] 39 (1877�) Ε] ⎖]
50 richardson ! James O. Richardson 1939-06-24 ! 24 Jun 1939   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1939� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCUS), 1940�. 2 1902 (USNA) Η] 37 (1878�) Ε] ⎜] Relieved, 1941.
51 hart ! Thomas C. Hart 1939-07-25 ! 25 Jul 1939   Commander in Chief, U.S. Asiatic Fleet (CINCAF), 1939�. 3 1897 (USNA) Η] 42 (1877�) ⎝] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1931� U.S. Senator from Connecticut, 1945�.
52 stark ! Harold R. Stark 1939-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1939   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1939� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe (COMNAVEUR), 1942�. 6 1903 (USNA) Η] 36 (1880�)
53 snyder ! Charles P. Snyder 1940-01-06 ! 06 Jan 1940   Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Fleet (COMBATFOR), 1940�. 1 1900 (USNA) Η] 40 (1879�) Ε] ⎜]
54 kimmel ! Husband E. Kimmel 1941-02-01-00 ! 01 Feb 1941   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (CINCPAC/CINCUS), 1941. 0 1904 (USNA) Η] 37 (1882�) Ε] Relieved, 1941. Brother-in-law of Navy four-star admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid.
55 king ! Ernest J. King 1941-02-01-01 ! 01 Feb 1941   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1941 Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet (COMINCH), 1941� Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet/Chief of Naval Operations (COMINCH/CNO), 1942� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1945 Special duty, 1945�. 4 1901 (USNA) Η] 40 (1878�) Promoted to fleet admiral, 17 Dec 1944. Awarded Congressional Gold Medal, 1946. Father-in-law of Air Force four-star general Frederic H. Smith Jr.
56 nimitz ! Chester W. Nimitz 1941-12-31 ! 31 Dec 1941   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), 1941� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas (CINCPAC/CINCPOA), 1943� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas/Military Governor of the Mariana Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPOA), 1944� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1945� Special duty, 1947�. 6 1905 (USNA) Η] 36 (1885�) Promoted to fleet admiral, 19 Dec 1944. Brother married daughter of Navy four-star admiral Charles F. Hughes.
57 ingersoll ! Royal E. Ingersoll 1942-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1942   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1941� Commander, Western Sea Frontier (COMWESTSEAFRON), 1944� Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet/Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (DCOMINCH/DCNO), 1944�. 3 1905 (USNA) Η] 37 (1883�)
58 halsey ! William F. Halsey Jr. 1942-11-18 ! 18 Nov 1942   Commander, South Pacific Area/Commander, South Pacific Force (COMSOPAC/COMSOPACFOR), 1942� Commander, U.S. Third Fleet (COMTHIRDFLT), 1944� Special duty, 1945�. 3 1904 (USNA) Η] 38 (1882�) Promoted to fleet admiral, 04 Dec 1945.
59 spruance ! Raymond A. Spruance 1944-02-16 ! 16 Feb 1944   Commander, Central Pacific Force (COMCENPACFOR), 1943� Commander, U.S. Fifth Fleet (COMFIFTHFLT), 1944� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas/Military Governor of the Marshall, Caroline, and Mariana Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPOA), 1945� President, Naval War College, 1946�. 4 1906 (USNA) Η] 38 (1886�) U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines, 1952�.
60 ingram ! Jonas H. Ingram 1944-11-15 ! 15 Nov 1944   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT), 1944�. 2 1909 (USNA) Η] 35 (1886�) Commissioner, All-America Football Conference, 1947�. Awarded Medal of Honor, 1914.
61 horne ! Frederick J. Horne 1944-12-15 ! 15 Dec 1944   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1942�. 1 1899 (USNA) Η] 45 (1880�)
62 edwards ! Richard S. Edwards Jr. 1945-04-03-00 ! 03 Apr 1945   Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet/Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (DCOMINCH/DCNO), 1944� Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1945� Commander, Western Sea Frontier/Commander, Pacific Reserve Fleet (COMWESTSEAFRON/COMPACRESFLT), 1946�. 2 1907 (USNA) Η] 38 (1885�)
63 hewitt ! H. Kent Hewitt 1945-04-03-01 ! 03 Apr 1945   Commander, U.S. Eighth Fleet (COMEIGHTHFLT), 1943� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe (COMNAVEUR), 1945� U.S. Naval Representative, U.N. Military Staff Committee (USNAVYMILCOMUNO), 1947�. 4 1907 (USNA) Η] 38 (1887�)
64 kinkaid ! Thomas C. Kinkaid 1945-04-03-02 ! 03 Apr 1945   Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet (COMSEVENTHFLT), 1943� Commander, Eastern Sea Frontier/Commander, Atlantic Reserve Fleet (COMEASTSEAFRON/COMLANTRESFLT), 1946�. 5 1908 (USNA) Η] 37 (1888�) Brother-in-law of Navy four-star admiral Husband E. Kimmel.
65 turnerrichmond ! Richmond K. Turner 1945-05-24 ! 24 May 1945   Commander, Amphibious Forces, Pacific (COMPHIBPAC), 1944� U.S Naval Representative, U.N. Military Staff Committee (USNAVYMILCOMUNO), 1945�. 2 1908 (USNA) Η] 37 (1885�)
66 robinson ! Samuel M. Robinson 1945-08-27 ! 27 Aug 1945   Director, Office of Procurement and Material, 1942�. 1 1903 (USNA) Η] 42 (1882�) Administrator, Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, 1946�. First engineering officer to attain rank of admiral.
* mccainjohns ! John S. McCain Sr. 1945-09-06 ! 06 Sep 1945   (posthumous) 0 1906 (USNA) Η] 39 (1884�) Father of Navy four-star admiral John S. McCain Jr. grandfather of U.S. Senator John S. McCain III.
67 towers ! John H. Towers 1945-11-07 ! 07 Nov 1945   Commander, U.S. Fifth Fleet (COMFIFTHFLT), 1945� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas/Military Governor of the Marshall, Caroline, and Mariana Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPOA), 1946� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Military Governor of the Marshall, Caroline, and Mariana Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1947 Chairman, General Board of the Navy, 1947. 2 1906 (USNA) Η] 39 (1885�)
68 ramsey ! DeWitt C. Ramsey 1945-12-28 ! 28 Dec 1945   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1946� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/High Commissioner, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1948�. 4 1912 (USNA) 33 (1888�)
69 denfeld ! Louis E. Denfeld 1946-01-07 ! 07 Jan 1946   Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/Military Governor of the Marshall, Caroline, and Mariana Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1947 Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/High Commissioner, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1947 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1947�. 2 1912 (USNA) 34 (1891�) ⎞] Candidate for Republican Party nomination for Governor of Massachusetts, 1950. Relieved, 1949.
70 cooke ! Charles M. Cooke Jr. 1946-01-08 ! 08 Jan 1946   Commander, U.S. Seventh Fleet (COMSEVENTHFLT), 1946� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Western Pacific (COMNAVWESPAC), 1947�. 2 1910 (USNA) Η] 36 (1886�)
71 mitscher ! Marc A. Mitscher 1946-03-01 ! 01 Mar 1946   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1946�. 1 1910 (USNA) Η] 36 (1887�) Died in office.
72 moreell ! Ben Moreell 1946-06-11 ! 11 Jun 1946   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1946. 0 1917 (CEC) 29 (1892�) First staff corps officer to attain rank of admiral.
73 conolly ! Richard L. Conolly 1946-09-23 ! 23 Sep 1946   Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Europe (COMNAVEUR), 1946 Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (COMNAVEASTLANTMED), 1946� Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCNAVEASTLANTMED), 1947� Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCNELM), 1948�. 4 1914 (USNA) 32 (1892�) ⎟] President, Long Island University, 1953�.
74 blandy ! William H.P. Blandy 1947-02-03 ! 03 Feb 1947   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1947 Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1947�. 3 1913 (USNA) 34 (1890�)
75 radford ! Arthur W. Radford 1949-04-07 ! 07 Apr 1949   Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet/High Commissioner, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1949� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1951� Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS), 1953�. 8 1916 (USNA) 33 (1896�) Married aunt of Army four-star general Michael S. Davison.
76 sherman ! Forrest P. Sherman 1949-11-02 ! 02 Nov 1949   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1949�. 2 1917 (USNA) 32 (1896�) Died in office.
77 fechteler ! William M. Fechteler 1950-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1950   Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1950� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1951� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1953�. 6 1916 (USNA) 34 (1896�)
78 carney ! Robert B. Carney 1950-10-02 ! 02 Oct 1950   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCNELM), 1950� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe/Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCSOUTH/CINCNELM), 1951� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1952� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1953�. 5 1916 (USNA) 34 (1895�) Aunt married Navy four-star admiral Frank B. Upham.
79 mccormick ! Lynde D. McCormick 1950-12-22 ! 22 Dec 1950   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1950� Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1951� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1952�. 4 1915 (USNA) 35 (1895�) ⎠]
80 duncandonaldb ! Donald B. Duncan 1951-08-09 ! 09 Aug 1951   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1951�. 5 1917 (USNA) 34 (1896�) Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1957�. Brother-in-law of U.S. Secretary of Commerce Harry L. Hopkins.
81 stump ! Felix B. Stump 1953-06-27 ! 27 Jun 1953   Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC/CINCPACFLT), 1953� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1958. 5 1917 (USNA) 36 (1894�)
82 wright ! Jerauld Wright 1954-04-06 ! 06 Apr 1954   Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1954�. 6 1917 (USNA) 37 (1898�) U.S. Ambassador to China, 1963�.
83 cassady ! John H. Cassady 1954-04-07 ! 07 Apr 1954   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCNELM), 1954�. 2 1918 (USNA) 36 (1896�)
84 burke ! Arleigh A. Burke 1955-06-06 ! 06 Jun 1955   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1955�. 6 1923 (USNA) 32 (1901�) Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1977.
85 briscoe ! Robert P. Briscoe 1956-04-30 ! 30 Apr 1956   Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1956�. 3 1918 (USNA) 38 (1897�)
86 boone ! Walter F. Boone 1956-05-01 ! 01 May 1956   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCNELM), 1956� U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1958�. 4 1920 (USNA) 36 (1898�) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1954� Deputy Associate Administrator for Defense Affairs, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1962�.
87 felt ! Harry D. Felt 1956-09-01 ! 01 Sep 1956   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1956� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1958�. 8 1923 (USNA) 33 (1902�)
88 curts ! Maurice E. Curts 1957-04-29 ! 29 Apr 1957   Deputy Commander in Chief, Pacific Command/Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (DCINCPAC/DCINCPACFLT), 1955� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1958. 1 1919 (USNA) 38 (1898�) ⎟]
89 hollowayjamesljr ! James L. Holloway Jr. 1958-01-01 ! 01 Jan 1958   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean/Commander in Chief, Specified Command Middle East (CINCNELM/CINCSPECOMME), 1958�. 1 1918 (USNA) 40 (1898�) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1947� Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1962�. Father of Navy four-star admiral James L. Holloway III.
90 hopwood ! Herbert G. Hopwood 1958-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1958   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1958�. 2 1919 (USNA) 39 (1898�)
91 russell ! James S. Russell 1958-07-21 ! 21 Jul 1958   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1958� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1961�. 7 1926 (USNA) 32 (1903�)
92 brown ! Charles R. Brown 1959-01-01 ! 01 Jan 1959   Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1959�. 2 1921 (USNA) 38 (1899�)
93 dennison ! Robert L. Dennison 1959-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1959   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean/Commander in Chief, Specified Command Middle East (CINCNELM/CINCSPECOMME), 1959� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1960�. 4 1923 (USNA) 36 (1901�)
94 smithharoldpage ! Harold Page Smith 1960-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1960   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCNELM), 1960� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1963�. 5 1924 (USNA) 36 (1904�) Uncle of Navy four-star admiral Leighton W. Smith, Jr.
95 sides ! John H. Sides 1960-03-01 ! 01 Mar 1960   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1960�. 3 1925 (USNA) 35 (1904�)
96 anderson ! George W. Anderson Jr. 1961-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1961   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1961�. 2 1927 (USNA) 34 (1906�) U.S. Ambassador to Portugal, 1961�.
97 ricketts ! Claude V. Ricketts 1961-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1961   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1961�. 3 1929 (USNA) 32 (1906�) Died in office.
98 mcdonalddavidl ! David L. McDonald 1963-04-01 ! 01 Apr 1963   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCNELM), 1963 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1963�. 4 1928 (USNA) 35 (1906�)
99 griffin ! Charles D. Griffin 1963-06-26 ! 26 Jun 1963   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCNELM), 1963 Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1963� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1965�. 5 1927 (USNA) 36 (1906�)
100 sharp ! U.S. Grant Sharp Jr. 1963-09-27 ! 27 Sep 1963   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1963� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1964�. 5 1927 (USNA) 36 (1906�) Great-aunt married U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant.
101 moorer ! Thomas H. Moorer 1964-06-26 ! 26 Jun 1964   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1964� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1965� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1967� Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS), 1970�. 10 1933 (USNA) 31 (1912�)
102 rivero ! Horacio Rivero Jr. 1964-07-31 ! 31 Jul 1964   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1964� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1968�. 8 1931 (USNA) 33 (1910�) U.S. Ambassador to Spain, 1972�.
103 thach ! John S. Thach 1965-03-25 ! 25 Mar 1965   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1965�. 2 1927 (USNA) 38 (1905�)
104 ward ! Alfred G. Ward 1965-03-27 ! 27 Mar 1965   U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1965�. 3 1932 (USNA) 33 (1909�)
105 johnsonroyl ! Roy L. Johnson 1965-03-31 ! 31 Mar 1965   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1965�. 2 1929 (USNA) 36 (1906�)
106 mccainjohnsjr ! John S. McCain Jr. 1967-05-01 ! 01 May 1967   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1967� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1968�. 5 1931 (USNA) 36 (1911�) Son of Navy four-star admiral John S. McCain Sr. father of U.S. Senator John S. McCain III.
107 galantin ! Ignatius J. Galantin 1967-05-19 ! 19 May 1967   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1965�. 3 1933 (USNA) 34 (1910�)
108 holmes ! Ephraim P. Holmes 1967-06-17 ! 17 Jun 1967   Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1967�. 3 1930 (USNA) 37 (1908�)
109 hyland ! John J. Hyland Jr. 1967-12-01 ! 01 Dec 1967   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1967�. 3 1934 (USNA) 33 (1912�)
110 clarey ! Bernard A. Clarey 1968-01-17 ! 17 Jan 1968   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1968� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1970�. 5 1934 (USNA) 34 (1912�)
111 wendt ! Waldemar F.A. Wendt 1968-07-12 ! 12 Jul 1968   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1968�. 3 1933 (USNA) 35 (1912�)
112 zumwalt ! Elmo R. Zumwalt Jr. 1970-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1970   Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1970�. 4 1942 (USNA) 28 (1920�) Democratic Party nominee for U.S. Senator from Virginia, 1976. Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1998.
113 duncancharlesk ! Charles K. Duncan 1970-09-01 ! 01 Sep 1970   Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1970�. 2 1933 (USNA) 37 (1911�)
114 arnold ! Jackson D. Arnold 1970-10-14 ! 14 Oct 1970   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1970�. 1 1934 (USNA) 36 (1912�) First restricted line officer to attain rank of admiral.
115 cousins ! Ralph W. Cousins 1970-10-30 30 Oct 1970   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1970� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1972�. 5 1937 (USNA) 33 (1915�)
116 bringle ! William F. Bringle 1971-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1971   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1971�. 2 1937 (USNA) 34 (1913�)
117 kidd ! Isaac C. Kidd Jr. 1971-12-01 ! 01 Dec 1971   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1971� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1975�. 7 1942 (USNA) 29 (1919�)
118 colbert ! Richard G. Colbert 1972-06-01 ! 01 Jun 1972   Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1972�. 1 1937 (USNA) 35 (1915�)
119 gayler ! Noel A.M. Gayler 1972-09-01-00 ! 01 Sep 1972   Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1972�. 4 1935 (USNA) 37 (1914–       ) Director, National Security Agency, 1969�.
120 weisner ! Maurice F. Weisner 1972-09-01-01 ! 01 Sep 1972   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1972� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1973� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1976�. 7 1941 (USNA) 31 (1917�)
121 hollowayjamesliii ! James L. Holloway III 1973-09-01-00 ! 01 Sep 1973   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1973� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1974�. 5 1942 (USNA) 31 (1922–       ) Son of Navy four-star admiral James L. Holloway Jr.
122 bagleyworthh ! Worth H. Bagley 1973-09-01-01 ! 01 Sep 1973   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1973� Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1974�. 2 1947 (USNA) 26 (1924–       ) Son of Navy four-star admiral David W. Bagley brother of Navy four-star admiral David H. Bagley great-aunt married Navy five-star admiral William D. Leahy great-aunt married U.S. Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels.
123 rickover ! Hyman G. Rickover 1973-11-16 ! 16 Nov 1973   Director, Division of Nuclear Reactors, 1948�. 9 1922 (USNA) 51 (1900�) ⎡] Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom, 1980 Congressional Gold Medal, 1958 and 1982.
124 johnston ! Means Johnston Jr. 1973-11-25 ! 25 Nov 1973   Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1973�. 2 1939 (USNA) 34 (1916�)
125 shear ! Harold E. Shear 1974-05-24 ! 24 May 1974   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1974� Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1975� Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1978�. 6 1942 (USNA) 32 (1918�) Administrator, U.S. Maritime Administration, 1981�.
126 weinel ! John P. Weinel 1974-08-02 ! 02 Aug 1974   U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1974�. 3 1939 (USNA) 35 (1916�)
127 michaelis ! Frederick H. Michaelis 1975-04-19 ! 19 Apr 1975   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1975�. 3 1940 (USNA) 35 (1917�)
128 bagleydavidh ! David H. Bagley 1975-05-21 ! 21 May 1975   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR), 1975�. 2 1943 (USNA) 32 (1920�) Son of Navy four-star admiral David W. Bagley brother of Navy four-star admiral Worth H. Bagley great-aunt married Navy five-star admiral William D. Leahy great-aunt married U.S. Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels.
129 turnerstansfield ! Stansfield Turner 1975-09-01 ! 01 Sep 1975   Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1975� Director of Central Intelligence (DCI), 1977�. 4 1946 (USNA) 29 (1923–       )
130 murphy ! Daniel J. Murphy 1976-00-00 ! 1976   Deputy to the Director of Central Intelligence for the Intelligence Community (D/DCI/IC), 1976�. 1 1943 (OCS) 33 (1922�) U.S. Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Policy, 1977� Chief of Staff to the , 1981�.
131 hayward ! Thomas B. Hayward 1976-08-12 ! 12 Aug 1976   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1976� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1978�. 6 1947 (USNA) 29 (1924–       )
132 long ! Robert L.J. Long 1977-07-05 ! 05 Jul 1977   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1977� Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1979�. 6 1943 (USNA) 34 (1920�)
133 davis ! Donald C. Davis 1978-05-09 ! 09 May 1978   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1978�. 3 1943 (USNA) 35 (1921�)
134 whittle ! Alfred J. Whittle Jr. 1978-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1978   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1978�. 3 1945 (USNA) 33 (1924�)
135 train ! Harry D. Train II 1978-10-01 ! 01 Oct 1978   Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1978�. 4 1949 (USNA) 29 (1927–       )
136 watkins ! James D. Watkins 1979-09-18 ! 18 Sep 1979   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1979� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1981� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1982�. 7 1949 (USNA) 30 (1927–       ) U.S. Secretary of Energy, 1989�.
137 crowe ! William J. Crowe Jr. 1980-05-30 ! 30 May 1980   Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCSOUTH), 1980� Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1983 Commander in Chief, Pacific Command (CINCPAC), 1983 Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1983� Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS), 1985�. 9 1947 (USNA) 33 (1925�) U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, 1994�. Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom, 2000.
138 inman ! Bobby R. Inman 1981-02-12 ! 12 Feb 1981   Deputy Director of Central Intelligence (DDCI), 1981�. 1 1952 (OCS) 29 (1931–       ) ⎢] Director, National Security Agency, 1977�. First naval intelligence specialist to attain rank of admiral.
139 small ! William N. Small 1981-07-01-00 ! 01 Jul 1981   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1981� Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1983�. 4 1948 (USNA) 33 (1927–       )
140 williams ! John G. Williams Jr. 1981-07-01-01 ! 01 Jul 1981   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1981�. 2 1947 (USNA) 34 (1924�)
141 kinnear ! George E.R. Kinnear II 1981-07-31 ! 31 Jul 1981   U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1981�. 1 1948 (OCS) 33 (1928–       )
142 mckee ! Kinnaird R. McKee 1982-03-02 ! 02 Mar 1982   Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion/Deputy Administrator, NNSA's Naval Reactors (NAVSEA 08), 1982�. 6 1951 (USNA) 31 (1929–       ) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1975�.
143 foley ! Sylvester R. Foley Jr. 1982-05-28 ! 28 May 1982   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1982�. 3 1950 (USNA) 32 (1928–       ) U.S. Assistant Secretary of Energy for Defense Programs, 1985�.
144 mcdonaldwesleyl ! Wesley L. McDonald 1982-10-01 ! 01 Oct 1982   Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/CINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1982� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (SACLANT/USCINCLANT/CINCLANTFLT), 1983�. 3 1946 (USNA) 36 (1924�)
145 hays ! Ronald J. Hays 1983-04-29 ! 29 Apr 1983   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1983� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1985�. 5 1950 (USNA) 33 (1928–       )
146 white ! Steven A. White 1983-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1983   Chief of Naval Material (CNM), 1983�. 2 1952 (NROTC) 31 (1928–       ) Manager of Nuclear Power, Tennessee Valley Authority, 1986�.
147 baggett ! Lee Baggett Jr. 1985-05-30 ! 30 May 1985   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1985 Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (SACLANT/USCINCLANT), 1985�. 3 1950 (USNA) 35 (1927�)
148 lyons ! James A. Lyons Jr. 1985-09-16 ! 16 Sep 1985   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1985�. 2 1952 (USNA) 33 (1927–       )
149 trost ! Carlisle A.H. Trost 1985-10-04 ! 04 Oct 1985   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet/Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (CINCLANTFLT/DCINCLANT), 1985� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1986�. 5 1953 (USNA) 32 (1930–       )
150 busey ! James B. Busey IV 1985-10-17 ! 17 Oct 1985   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1985� Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1987�. 4 1954 (NROTC) 31 (1932–       ) Administrator, Federal Aviation Administration, 1989� U.S. Deputy Secretary of Transportation, 1991�.
151 moreau ! Arthur S. Moreau Jr. 1985-11-15 ! 15 Nov 1985   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1985�. 1 1953 (USNA) 32 (1931�)
152 kelso ! Frank B. Kelso II 1986-06-13 ! 13 Jun 1986   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet/Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (CINCLANTFLT/DCINCLANT), 1986 Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1986� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (SACLANT/USCINCLANT), 1988� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1990�. 8 1956 (USNA) 30 (1933–       )
153 hardisty ! Huntington Hardisty 1987-03-11 ! 11 Mar 1987   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1987� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1988�. 4 1952 (USNA) 35 (1929�)
154 carter ! Powell F. Carter Jr. 1987-10-01-00 ! 01 Oct 1987   U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1987� Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1988�. 4 1955 (USNA) 32 (1931–       )
155 jeremiah ! David E. Jeremiah 1987-10-01-01 ! 01 Oct 1987   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1987� Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (VCJCS), 1990�. 7 1955 (OCS) 32 (1934–       )
156 edney ! Leon A. Edney 1988-10-01 ! 01 Oct 1988   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1988� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (SACLANT/USCINCLANT), 1990�. 4 1957 (USNA) 31 (1935–       )
157 demars ! Bruce DeMars 1988-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1988   Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion/Deputy Administrator, NNSA's Naval Reactors (NAVSEA 08), 1988�. 8 1957 (USNA) 31 (1935–       )
158 hogg ! James R. Hogg 1988-12-01 ! 01 Dec 1988   U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1988�. 3 1956 (USNA) 32 (1934–       )
159 howe ! Jonathan T. Howe 1989-06-01 ! 01 Jun 1989   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1989� Deputy National Security Advisor, 1991�. 3 1957 (USNA) 32 (1935–       ) U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Politico-Military Affairs, 1982� Special Representative of the U.N. Secretary General for Somalia, 1993�.
160 larson ! Charles R. Larson 1990-03-01 ! 01 Mar 1990   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1990� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1991� Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1994�. 8 1958 (USNA) 32 (1936–       ) ⎣] Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1983� Democratic Party nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, 2002.
161 johnsonjeromel ! Jerome L. Johnson 1990-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1990   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1990�. 2 1956 (NROTC) 34 (1935–       )
162 miller ! Paul David Miller 1991-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1991   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1991� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (SACLANT/USCINCLANT), 1992� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (SACLANT/USCINCACOM), 1993�. 3 1964 (OCS) 27 (1941–       )
163 smithwilliamd ! William D. Smith 1991-02-22 ! 22 Feb 1991   U.S. Military Representative, NATO Military Committee (USMILREP), 1991�. 2 1955 (USNA) 36 (1933–       )
164 kelly ! Robert J. Kelly 1991-03-01 ! 01 Mar 1991   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1991�. 3 1959 (USNA) 32 (1938–       )
165 boorda ! Jeremy M. Boorda 1992-03-02 ! 02 Mar 1992   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1991� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1994�. 4 1962 (OCS) 30 (1938�) Died in office.
166 studeman ! William O. Studeman 1992-04-09 ! 09 Apr 1992   Deputy Director of Central Intelligence (DDCI), 1992�. 3 1962 (NROTC) 30 (1940–       ) Director, National Security Agency, 1988�.
167 arthur ! Stanley R. Arthur 1992-07-06 ! 06 Jul 1992   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1992�. 3 1957 (NROTC) 35 (1935–       ) ⎤]
168 mauz ! Henry H. Mauz Jr. 1992-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1992   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1992�. 2 1959 (USNA) 33 (1936–       )
169 chiles ! Henry G. Chiles Jr. 1994-02-14 ! 14 Feb 1994   Commander in Chief, U.S. Strategic Command (USCINCSTRAT), 1994�. 2 1960 (USNA) 34 (1938–       )
170 owens ! William A. Owens 1994-03-01 ! 01 Mar 1994   Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (VCJCS), 1994�. 2 1962 (USNA) 32 (1940–       )
171 smithleightonwjr ! Leighton W. Smith Jr. 1994-05-01 ! 01 May 1994   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1994�. 2 1962 (USNA) 32 (1939–       ) Nephew of Navy four-star admiral Harold Page Smith.
172 macke ! Richard C. Macke 1994-10-01 ! 01 Oct 1994   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1994�. 2 1960 (USNA) 34 (1938–       ) Ε] Relieved, 1996.
173 zlatoper ! Ronald J. Zlatoper 1994-10-05 ! 05 Oct 1994   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1994�. 2 1963 (NROTC) 31 (1941–       )
174 flanagan ! William J. Flanagan Jr. 1994-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1994   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1994� 2 1964 (MMA) ⎥] 30 (1943–       )
175 prueher ! Joseph W. Prueher 1995-06-01 ! 01 Jun 1995   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1995� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1996�. 4 1964 (USNA) 31 (1942–       ) U.S. Ambassador to China, 1999�.
176 johnsonjayl ! Jay L. Johnson 1996-04-01 ! 01 Apr 1996   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1996 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 1996�. 4 1968 (USNA) 28 (1946–       )
177 lopez ! Thomas J. Lopez 1996-07-31 ! 31 Jul 1996   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1996�. 2 1964 (NROTC) 32 (1940–       )
178 bowman ! Frank L. Bowman 1996-10-01-00 ! 01 Oct 1996   Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion/Deputy Administrator, NNSA's Naval Reactors (NAVSEA 08), 1996�. 8 1966 (NROTC) 30 (1944–       )
179 gehman ! Harold W. Gehman Jr. 1996-10-01-01 ! 01 Oct 1996   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1996� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command (SACLANT/USCINCACOM), 1997� Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander in Chief, U.S. Joint Forces Command (SACLANT/USCINCJFCOM), 1999�. 4 1965 (NROTC) 31 (1942–       )
180 clemins ! Archie R. Clemins 1997-01-01 ! 01 Jan 1997   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1996�. 2 1966 (NROTC) 31 (1943–       )
181 reason ! J. Paul Reason 1997-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1997   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1996�. 2 1965 (USNA) 32 (1941–       )
182 pilling ! Donald L. Pilling 1997-10-30 ! 30 Oct 1997   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 1997�. 3 1965 (USNA) 32 (1943–       )
183 mies ! Richard W. Mies 1998-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1998   Commander in Chief, U.S. Strategic Command (USCINCSTRAT), 1998�. 3 1967 (USNA) 31 (1944–       )
184 abbot ! Charles S. Abbot 1998-09-01 ! 01 Sep 1998   Deputy Commander in Chief, U.S. European Command (DCINCEUR), 1998�. 2 1966 (USNA) 32 (1945–       ) Deputy Director, , 2001�.
185 ellis ! James O. Ellis 1999-01-01 ! 01 Jan 1999   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 1998� Commander in Chief, U.S. Strategic Command (USCINCSTRAT), 2001� Commander, U.S. Strategic Command (CDRUSSTRATCOM), 2002�. 5 1969 (USNA) 30 (1947–       )
186 blair ! Dennis C. Blair 1999-05-01 ! 01 May 1999   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 1999�. 3 1968 (USNA) 31 (1946–       ) President, Institute for Defense Analyses, 2003� Director of National Intelligence, 2009�.
187 clark ! Vernon E. Clark 1999-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1999   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 1999� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 2000�. 6 1968 (OCS) 31 (1944–       )
188 fargo ! Thomas B. Fargo 1999-12-01 ! 01 Dec 1999   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 1999� Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (USCINCPAC), 2002 Commander, U.S. Pacific Command (CDRUSPACOM), 2002�. 6 1970 (USNA) 29 (1948–       )
189 natter ! Robert J. Natter 2000-09-01 ! 01 Sep 2000   Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (CINCLANTFLT), 2000� Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet/Commander, Fleet Forces Command (CINCLANTFLT/COMFLTFORCOM), 2001� Commander, Fleet Forces Command/Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMFLTFORCOM/COMLANTFLT), 2002�. 3 1967 (USNA) 33 (1945–       )
190 fallon ! William J. Fallon 2000-11-01 ! 01 Nov 2000   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 2000� Commander, Fleet Forces Command/Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMFLTFORCOM/COMLANTFLT), 2003� Commander, U.S. Pacific Command (CDRUSPACOM), 2005� Commander, U.S. Central Command (CDRUSCENTCOM), 2007�. 8 1967 (NROTC) 33 (1944–       ) Resigned, 2008.
191 johnsongregoryg ! Gregory G. Johnson 2001-10-24 ! 24 Oct 2001   Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (CINCUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 2001� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander in Chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe (COMUSNAVEUR/CINCSOUTH), 2002� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples (COMUSNAVEUR/COMJFC Naples), 2004. 3 1969 (NROTC) 32 (1946–       )
192 doran ! Walter F. Doran 2002-05-04 ! 04 May 2002   Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet (CINCPACFLT), 2002 Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMPACFLT), 2002�. 3 1967 (NROTC) 35 (1945–       )
193 giambastiani ! Edmund P. Giambastiani Jr. 2002-10-02 ! 02 Oct 2002   Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command (SACLANT/CDRUSJFCOM), 2002� Supreme Allied Commander Transformation/Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command (SACT/CDRUSJFCOM), 2003� Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (VCJCS), 2005�. 5 1970 (USNA) 32 (1948–       )
194 mullen ! Michael G. Mullen 2003-08-28 ! 28 Aug 2003   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 2003� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples (COMUSNAVEUR/COMJFC Naples), 2004� Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 2005� Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS), 2007–present. 7 1968 (USNA) 35 (1946–       )
195 nathman ! John B. Nathman 2004-12-01 ! 01 Dec 2004   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 2004� Commander, Fleet Forces Command/Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet (COMFLTFORCOM/COMLANTFLT), 2005� Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (COMUSFLTFORCOM), 2006�. 3 1970 (USNA) 34 (1948–       )
196 keating ! Timothy J. Keating 2005-01-01-00 ! 01 Jan 2005   Commander, U.S. Northern Command/Commander, North American Aerospace Defense Command (CDRUSNORTHCOM/CDRNORAD), 2004� Commander, U.S. Pacific Command (CDRUSPACOM), 2007�. 5 1971 (USNA) 34 (1949–       )
197 donald ! Kirkland H. Donald 2005-01-01-01 ! 01 Jan 2005   Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion/Deputy Administrator, NNSA's Naval Reactors (NAVSEA 08), 2004–present. 6 1975 (USNA) 30 (1953–       )
198 willard ! Robert F. Willard 2005-03-18 ! 18 Mar 2005   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 2005� Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMPACFLT), 2007� Commander, U.S. Pacific Command (CDRUSPACOM), 2009–present. 5 1973 (USNA) 32 (1950–       )
199 ulrich ! Henry G. Ulrich III 2005-07-22 ! 22 Jul 2005   Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples (COMUSNAVEUR/COMJFC Naples), 2005�. 2 1972 (USNA) 33 (1950–       )
200 roughead ! Gary Roughead 2005-09-01 ! 01 Sep 2005   Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMPACFLT), 2005� Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (COMUSFLTFORCOM), 2007 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), 2007–present. 5 1973 (USNA) 32 (1951–       )
201 stavridis ! James G. Stavridis 2006-10-18 ! 18 Oct 2006   Commander, U.S. Southern Command (CDRUSSOUTHCOM), 2006� Commander, U.S. European Command/Supreme Allied Commander Europe (CDRUSEUCOM/SACEUR), 2009–present. 4 1976 (USNA) 30 (1955–       )
202 walsh ! Patrick M. Walsh 2007-04-00 ! Apr 2007   Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 2007� Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet (COMPACFLT), 2009–present. 3 1977 (USNA) 30 (1955–       )
203 olson ! Eric T. Olson 2007-07-06 ! 06 Jul 2007   Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command (CDRUSSOCOM), 2007–present. 3 1973 (USNA) 34 (1952–       ) First Navy SEAL to achieve the grade of four-star admiral.
204 greenert ! Jonathan W. Greenert 2007-09-00 ! Sep 2007   Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (COMUSFLTFORCOM), 2007� Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO), 2009–present. 3 1975 (USNA) 32 (1953–       )
205 fitzgerald ! Mark P. Fitzgerald 2007-11-30 ! 30 Nov 2007   Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples (COMUSNAVEUR/COMJFC Naples), 2007� Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Africa/Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples (COMUSNAVEUR/COMUSNAVAF/COMJFC Naples), 2009–present. 3 1973 (NROTC) 34 (1951–       )
206 harvey ! John C. Harvey Jr. 2009-24-07 ! 24 Jul 2009   Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (COMUSFLTFORCOM), 2009–present. 1 1973 (USNA) 36 (1951–       )
207 winnefeld ! James A. Winnefeld, Jr. 2010-19-05 ! 19 May 2010   Commander, U.S. Northern Command/Commander, North American Aerospace Defense Command (CDRUSNORTHCOM/CDRNORAD), 2009–present. 0 1978 (NROTC) 32 (1956–       )
208 locklear ! Samuel J. Locklear III 2010-13-00 !   Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe/Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Africa/Commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples (COMUSNAVEUR/COMUSNAVAF/COMJFC Naples) ⎦] 0 1977 (USNA) -- (1954–       )

Tombstone admirals [ edit | edit source ]

The Act of Congress of March 4, 1925 allowed officers in the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard to be promoted one grade upon retirement if they had been specially commended for performance of duty in actual combat. Combat citation promotions were colloquially known as "tombstone promotions" because they conferred the prestige of the higher rank but not the additional retirement pay, so their only practical benefit was to allow recipients to engrave a loftier title on their business cards and tombstones. The Act of Congress of February 23, 1942 enabled tombstone promotions to three- and four-star grades. Tombstone promotions were subsequently restricted to citations issued before January 1, 1947, and finally eliminated altogether effective November 1, 1959.

Any admiral who actually served in a grade while on active duty receives precedence on the retired list over any tombstone admiral holding the same retired grade. Tombstone admirals rank among each other according to the dates of their highest active duty grade.

The following list of tombstone admirals is sortable by last name, date of rank as vice admiral, date retired, and year commissioned.

Name Date of rank (VADM) Date retired Commission Β] Notes
1 calhoun ! William L. Calhoun 1942-06-16 ! 16 Jun 1942   1946-12-00 ! Dec 1946   1906 (USNA) Η] (1885�) ⎧] Great-grandson of John C. Calhoun.
2 fletcher ! Frank J. Fletcher 1942-06-26 ! 26 Jun 1942   1947-05-00 ! May 1947   1906 (USNA) Η] (1885�) Awarded Medal of Honor, 1914. Nephew of Navy four-star admiral Frank F. Fletcher.
3 fitch ! Aubrey W. Fitch 1942-12-28 ! 28 Dec 1942   1947-07-00 ! Jul 1947   1906 (USNA) Η] (1883�) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1945�.
4 hoover ! John H. Hoover 1943-01-01 ! 01 Jan 1943   1948-07-00 ! Jul 1948   1906 (USNA) Η] (1887�)
5 kirk ! Alan G. Kirk 1944-09-10 ! 10 Sep 1944   1946-03-00 ! Mar 1946   1909 (USNA) Η] (1888�) U.S. Ambassador to Belgium and Luxembourg, 1946� to Soviet Union, 1949� to China, 1962�.
6 murray ! George D. Murray 1944-11-29 ! 29 Nov 1944   1951-08-00 ! Aug 1951   1911 (USNA) Η] (1889�)
7 oldendorf ! Jesse B. Oldendorf 1944-12-07 ! 07 Dec 1944   1948-09-00 ! Sep 1948   1909 (USNA) Η] (1887�)
8 carpender ! Arthur S. Carpender 1945-04-03 ! 03 Apr 1945   1946-11-00 ! Nov 1946   1908 (USNA) Η] (1884�) Superintendent, Admiral Farragut Academy, 1948󈝿??
9 hill ! Harry W. Hill 1945-04-22 ! 22 Apr 1945   1952-05-00 May 1952   1911 (USNA) Η] (1890�) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1950� Governor, U.S. Naval Home, 1952�.
10 sherman ! Frederick C. Sherman 1945-07-13 ! 13 Jul 1945   1947-03-00 ! Mar 1947   1910 (USNA) Η] (1880�)
11 hall ! John L. Hall Jr. 1945-12-10 ! 10 Dec 1945   1953-05-00 ! May 1953   1913 (USNA) (1891�)
12 badger ! Oscar C. Badger II 1945-12-13 ! 13 Dec 1945   1952-06-00 ! Jun 1952   1911 (USNA) Η] (1890�) Awarded Medal of Honor, 1914. Cousin of U.S. Secretary of the Navy George E. Badger.
13 price ! John D. Price 1946-08-31 ! 31 Aug 1946   1954-06-00 ! Jun 1954   1916 (USNA) (1892�)
14 low ! Francis S. Low 1947-03-12 ! 12 Mar 1947   1956-07-00 ! Jul 1956   1915 (USNA) (1894�)
15 bagley ! David W. Bagley 1947-04-01 ! 01 Apr 1947   1947-04-00 ! Apr 1947   1904 (USNA) Η] (1883�) Father of Navy four-star admiral David H. Bagley and Navy four-star admiral Worth H. Bagley grandson of North Carolina Governor Jonathan Worth aunt married U.S. Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels wife's aunt married Navy five-star admiral William D. Leahy.
16 sallada ! Harold B. Sallada 1947-05-11 ! 11 May 1947   1949-10-00 ! Oct 1949   1917 (USNA) (1895�)
17 struble ! Arthur D. Struble 1948-04-26 ! 26 Apr 1948   1956-07-00 ! Jul 1956   1915 (USNA) ⎨] (1894�)
18 berkey ! Russell S. Berkey 1948-07-01 ! 01 Jul 1948   1950-09-00 ! Sep 1950   1916 (USNA) (1893�)
19 reeves ! John W. Reeves, Jr. 1949-04-01 ! 01 Apr 1949   1950-05-00 ! May 1950   1911 (USNA) Η] (1888�) General Manager, Los Angeles International Airport, 1950�.
20 joy ! C. Turner Joy 1949-08-01 ! 01 Aug 1949   1954-07-00 ! Jul 1954   1916 (USNA) (1895�) Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy, 1952�.
21 sprague ! Thomas L. Sprague 1949-08-15 ! 15 Aug 1949   1952-04-00 ! Apr 1952   1917 (USNA) (1894�)
22 ballentine ! John J. Ballentine 1949-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1949   1954-05-00 ! May 1954   1917 (USNA) (1896�)
23 gardner ! Matthias B. Gardner 1950-10-01 ! 01 Oct 1950   1956-08-00 ! Aug 1956   1919 (USNA) (1897�)
24 noble ! Albert G. Noble 1950-12-29 ! 29 Dec 1950   1951-10-00 ! Oct 1951   1917 (USNA) (1885�)
25 martin ! Harold M. Martin 1951-02-01 ! 01 Feb 1951   1956-02-00 ! Feb 1956   1919 (USNA) (1896�)
26 davis ! Arthur C. Davis 1951-02-12 ! 12 Feb 1951   1955-04-00 ! Apr 1955   1915 (USNA) (1893�)
27 dubose ! Laurence T. DuBose 1951-03-30 ! 30 Mar 1951   1955-06-00 ! Jun 1955   1913 (USNA) (1893�)
28 fife ! James Fife Jr. 1951-08-09 ! 09 Aug 1951   1955-08-00 ! Aug 1955   1918 (USNA) (1897�) Director, Mystic Seaport, 1956󈝿??
29 fahrion ! Frank G. Fahrion 1951-12-28 ! 28 Dec 1951   1956-05-00 ! May 1956   1917 (USNA) (1894�)
30 clark ! Joseph J. Clark 1952-03-07 ! 07 Mar 1952   1953-12-00 ! Dec 1953   1918 (USNA) (1893�)
31 good ! Roscoe F. Good 1953-03-27 ! 27 Mar 1953   1958-03-00 ! Mar 1958   1919 (USNA) (1897�)
32 phillips ! William K. Phillips 1953-07-28 ! 28 Jul 1953   1955-08-00 ! Aug 1955   1918 (USNA) (1894�)
33 gingrich ! John E. Gingrich 1953-07-30 ! 30 Jul 1953   1954-10-00 ! Oct 1954   1919 (USNA) (1897�)
34 pride ! Alfred M. Pride 1953-10-09 ! 09 Oct 1953   1959-10-00 ! Oct 1959   1918 (OCS) ⎩] (1897�)
35 wooldridge ! Edmund T. Wooldridge 1954-04-06 ! 06 Apr 1954   1958-08-00 ! Aug 1958   1920 (USNA) (1897�)
36 doyle ! Austin K. Doyle 1954-05-07 ! 07 May 1954   1958-08-00 ! Aug 1958   1920 (USNA) (1898�)
37 murray ! Stuart S. Murray 1955-12-07 ! 07 Dec 1955   1956-08-00 ! Aug 1956   1918 (USNA) (1898�) Nephew of Oklahoma governor William H. Murray.
38 glover ! Cato D. Glover Jr. 1955-12-08 ! 08 Dec 1955   1957-09-00 ! Sep 1957   1919 (USNA) (1897�)
39 will ! John M. Will 1956-04-17 ! 17 Apr 1956   1959-07-00 ! Jul 1959   1923 (USNA) (1899�)
40 hanlon ! Byron N. Hanlon 1957-11-01 ! 01 Nov 1957   1958-10-00 ! Oct 1958   1921 (USNA) (1900�)


Thomas L. Sprague

Thomas Lamison Sprague (* 2. Oktober 1894 in Lima, Ohio † 17. September 1972 in Chula Vista, Kalifornien) war ein Vizeadmiral der United States Navy während des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Er war Kommandant der Geleitflugzeugträger während der Seeschlacht vor Samar, eines Teils der See- und Luftschlacht im Golf von Leyte.

Thomas Lamison Sprague wurde am 2. Oktober 1894 in Lima, Ohio, geboren. Er schloss 1917 die United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Mit Clifton Sprague, der mit ihm die Akademie abschloss, war er nicht verwandt.

Während des Ersten Weltkriegs diente Sprague an Bord des Kreuzers USS Cleveland, der von Juni 1917 bis April 1918 zur Konvoisicherung im Atlantik eingesetzt war. Nach einer kurzen Zeit an Land assistierte Sprague bei der Indienststellung des Zerstörers USS Montgomery im Juli 1918. Von Januar bis November 1920 erhielt er das Kommando über den Zerstörer. Nachdem er auf der Pensacola Naval Air Station eine Pilotenausbildung absolviert hatte, diente er von 1921 bis 1923 im Stab des Befehlshabers der Marineflieger im Pazifik, Admiral Henry V. Butler.

1926 wurde Sprague zum Aufklärungsgeschwader 1 auf die USS Maryland versetzt, bevor er 1928 zur San Diego Naval Air Station versetzt wurde. Zwischen 1931 und 1936 war Sprague Kommandant des Aufklärungsgeschwaders 6, Direktor des Motorenlabors der Philadelphia Naval Aircraft Factory sowie Air officer an Bord der USS Saratoga, bevor er 1937 als Superintendent des Marinefliegertrainings nach Pensacola kam. 1940/41 diente er als Executive Officer an Bord der USS Ranger während der Neutralitätspatrouillen im Atlantik. Im Februar 1942 erhielt er das Kommando über den neu in Dienst gestellten Geleitflugzeugträger USS Charger, das er bis zum Dezember 1942 innehatte. Nach fünf Monaten im Dienst des Stabes der Marineflieger der Atlantikflotte erhielt er im August 1943 das Kommando über die USS Intrepid, die er während der Angriffe auf Truk und die Marshallinseln kommandierte.

Im Juni 1944 wurde er zum Konteradmiral befördert und erhielt das Kommando über die Carrier Division 22, die die Angriffe auf Saipan im Juli und August und auf Morotai im September 1944 unterstützte. Während der See- und Luftschlacht im Golf von Leyte war er Oberbefehlshaber der 18 Geleitträger der Task Group 77.4 (“Taffy 1”) und Befehlshaber der Carrier Division 22. Für seinen Einsatz während der Schlacht am 25. Oktober 1944 erhielt Sprague das Navy Cross. Kurzzeitig befehligte er die Trainingsträger der Carrier Division 11, bevor er die Carrier Division 3 von April bis Juni 1945 vor Okinawa führte.

Bei Kriegsende hatte er das Kommando über die Task Force 38.1 während der letzten Luftangriffe auf die japanischen Heimatinseln. 1946 wurde er zum Chief of the Bureau of Naval Personnel ernannt, im August 1949 wurde Sprague zum Vizeadmiral befördert. Im Oktober 1949 wurde er Befehlshaber der Pacific Fleet Air Force, diesen Posten behielt er bis zum Ausscheiden aus dem aktiven Dienst im April 1952.

1956 kehrte er kurzzeitig in den aktiven Dienst zurück, um mit der Regierung der Philippinen über den Status der US-Basen im Land zu verhandeln.

Thomas Lamison Sprague starb am 17. September 1972 in Chula Vista, Kalifornien.


Capt. Richard Kenna Gaines was the first Executive Officer of the USS Intrepid August 16, 1943. Then Cmdr. Gaines, helped outfit the Intrepid and train her crew for attacks at Truk, Kwajalien, Mindoro, Palau, the Philippines, Okinawa and the Coast of Japan, 1943.

The score for this campaign tallied 60 planes shot down, 105 planes destroyed on the ground, 11 nearby ships sunk and nine vessels damaged. Then in March of 1944 with Intrepid laid up at Hunter’s Point, Captain Sprague turned over command to Executive Officer, Cmdr. Gaines. It was then turned over to Capt. Sample and Cmdr. Gaines went back to Exec. Officer.

In May, Capt. Sample left to take over the USS Lexington and gave command of the Intrepid back to Cmdr. Gaines until Capt. Bolger assumed command.

On September 29, 1944 Cmdr. Gaines left the Intrepid to be commissioned Captain.

Capt. Richard Kenna Gaines was born in White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., son of Congressman Joseph Holt Gaines. He graduated from Bordentown, NJ Military Institute in preparation for the Naval Academy from where he graduated in 1925.

Following graduation he served successively on the USS New York and the USS Sapelo. After flight training at Pensacola, FL he was designated Naval Aviator in 1928, then joined the USS Lexington for duty as Assistant Gunnery Officer.

He was a Flight Instructor at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, from 1930 to 1932 and was a member of the Pensacola Naval Air Station stunt Team, Top Gallants (forerunners to the Blue Angels) flying F2B-1s carrying on budding tradition of superb formation acrobatics, with J. G. Crommelin and Bill Davis. As a member of the Pensacola Naval Air Station famous stunt team he won the Birmingham Cup for outstanding performance.

Sea duty followed with consecutive service until 1934 on board the USS Saratoga, as Assistant Gunnery Officer of Fighting Squadron ONE and attached to the USS Arkansas, as Gunnery Officer of Observation Squadron ONE.

He was a Flag Aide aboard the USS Yorktown CV-5 in March of 1940 He was then Commander of the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Glenview, IL, 1940-42 Commander of the famous Air Group 10, USS Enterprise which he organized during defense of Solomon Island areas in 3d Savo and Santa Cruz battles, 1942-1943. In 1943 he served on the staff of Admiral Halsey in the planning and development of Pacific Bases Member Staff Commander Air South Pacific. He then became the First Executive Officer, USS Intrepid, 1943 Deputy Chief Naval Air Technical Training Command, 1945-46 Commander USS Salerno Bay, 1946-47 Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, Whiting Field, 1947-48 Pensacola, 1948-50 Fleet Air Wing Two and Fleet Air Hawaii – Barber’s Point (lived on Ford Island as Chief of Staff to the Admiral, 1949-52.) He was given the rank of Commodore (a title only given during wartime) during the Korean War Chief of Staff to Chairman of US Mission to Military Staff United Nations, 1953-55. He retired in 1955 and became Executive Director, Philippine-American Chamber of Commerce, 1955-58.

Capt. Gaines was the recipient of the Presidential Unit Citation, a commendation medal for action in the Solomons, the Victory Medal, The American Defense Medal, The Pacific Theatre of Operations Medal with seven battle stars and the American Theatre of Operations Medal.

Capt. Gaines died in the Marine Air Base hospital in Beaufort, SC right after his 65 th birthday from complications caused by leukemia.

He left his wife, Maud Werner of New Orleans and 4 children, Richard Kenna Gaines, Jr. who graduated from the Naval Academy in 1955 (with Percy Williams who was a former crew member and crashed and sank off the Intrepid in 1959), Carlisle Sullivan of Greenville, SC, Anna Louise Wren of Cummings, GA and Maud Tarrant, of Larchmont, NY. He and his wife, Maud, are interred in Arlington National Cemetery.

Daughter Maud (Gaines) Tarrant is very involved in the USS Intrepid Former Crewmembers Association.


Delaware County NY Genealogy and History Site

The hamlet of Hale Eddy is in both Delaware and Broome Counties.
It is divided by the Delaware River.
Hale Eddy Cemetery is in the Town of Sanford, Broome County.

Anne Parsons, Historian, Town of Sanford

Additions:
I have some names to add to this cemetery list. After getting some names off the list above, I visited this cemetery and when I went there I found many more relatives than I thought were there. Patty Hart Cochran, Nov 6, 2000

The following is from Hales Eddy cemetery:

George W. Clapper 1884-1964
Mildred B. Thomas Clapper 1885-1963
Rexford Hart 1898-1973
Edith A Mitchell 1898-1948
Elizabeth A Begeal Hart 1895-1963
Leroy Hart 1887-1980
Nellie I Begeal Hart 1870-1953
Elmer Hart 1860-1947
Marjorie O Hart 1899-1980
Olin V 1896-1979
Harriet M Clapper Begeal 1870-1941
Grant Begeal 1872-1938
Dorothy Decker 1900-1972
Eva L Begeal 1889-1957
Edgar J Begeal 1881-1969
Archie Begeal 1891-1933
Calvin Clapper 1905-1953
Hattie Clapper 1883-
Lewis 1876-
Joshua Begeal 1820-1908
Mary Ann Begeal 1823-1906
E.J. Hart 1868-no date listed because he is not buried there. He is buried in Middlebury Connecticut.
Minnie V Clapper Hart 1871-1905
William E Begeal 1839-1928
Henry J Begeal 1875-1950
W McKinley Begeal 1896-1987
Gladys Begeal 1901-1995
Edgar J Begeal 1881-1969
Eva Begeal 1889-1957
Homer C Begeal 1913-1992
Coral M Albee Travis 1889-1941
Emma M Jayco Travis 1863-1935
Milton T Travis 1868-1944
Clara J Chase Travis 1873-1953
Jennie M Travis 1868-1960
Fred M Travis 1867-1931
Walter G Travis 1898-1966
Ester H Travis 1901-1966
Katherine Clapper Travis 1868-1938
Wm Henry Travis 1864-1946
Brother Alton Roberts 1906-1979
Martha Begeal Travis 1862-1954
Zina S Travis 1883-1944
Frank G Travis 1859-1935
Elgie Terwilliger Begeal 1874-1945
Robert Travis Surine Jr 1951-1996
Vernon L Hart 1858-1935 * Note of July 31, 2008 - Sarepta Stalker dau. of Joseph B. and Sylvia (Bradee) Stalker married Clinton Clearwater as her second husband. She married first William Hines Sampson in Pennsylvania. I have her father's Civil War pension file where he names his living children and Sarepta is listed as Sarepta Clearwater. --Susan Mulvey

Paul A. Wormuth 06/01/1919-11/02/1966 and Mary Wormuth 02/04/1909-02/07/1981. --from TVL, September 23, 2008


Sources:

Barr, Cyrilla. "The Musicological Legacy of Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge," in Journal of Musicology. Vol. 11, no. 2. Spring, 1993, pp. 250–268.

Bedford, William C. "Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, the Education of a Patron of Chamber Music: The Early Years" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Missouri, 1964).

Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

"Godmother of Chamber Music," in Newsweek. Vol. 24, no. 20. November 13, 1944, pp. 102, 104.

Keefer, Lubov. Music Angels: A Thousand Years of Patronage. Baltimore, MD: Sutherland Press, 1976.

Neuls-Bates, Carol. "Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, twentieth-century benefactress of chamber music," in Judith Lang Zaimont, ed. The Musical Woman: An International Perspective, Vol. II: 1984–1985. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1987, pp. 136–144.

"Patroness," in Time. Vol. 52, no. 2. July 12, 1948, pp. 32, 34.

Temianka, Henri, and Donald L. Leavitt. "The Boundless Legacy of Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge," in Chamber Music Magazine. Vol. 2, no. 1, 1985, pp. 14–17.


HistoryLink.org

Winthrop, Okanogan County, on the North Cascades Highway, is one of the most historic and scenic towns in North Central Washington. It stands at the confluence of the Methow River with its tributary, the Chewuch (Chewack) River, at an idyllic spot where the Methow Indians once fished and hunted. Next came the miners and trappers who camped in the area. In 1886, when the federal government discontinued the Moses Reservation, to which it had relegated local Indians, white settlers began homesteading in the area. Until the arrival of Easterner Guy Waring (1859?-1936) and opening of his trading post in January 1892, they had to travel miles for supplies. In 1897 it was incorporated as the Methow Trading Company, which expanded the mercantile business and began acquiring land. In 1901 Waring’s Trading Company platted the town, which was finally incorporated in 1924. Earlier, it had been named for another Easterner, Theodore Winthrop. The area suffered its share of fires, floods, and devastating snowfalls and freezes, all of which made a precarious existence even more difficult. With the completion of the spectacular North Cascades Highway portion of State Highway 20 in 1972, the struggling community reinvented itself as a tourist attraction, by restoring old buildings to their early frontier appearance. Even in winter, when the North Cascades Highway is closed, this tiny village of only 373 (in 2007) permanent residents attracts visitors drawn by the unsurpassed scenery, the Old West character, and many recreational opportunities.

First Peoples

Human habitation of the Methow Valley dates back 8,000 to 10,000 years. Before these people acquired horses, they spent the entire year in the valley, wintering in bermed pit houses to protect themselves from the cold. During the rest of the year, they could move about to seasonal camps while living in teepees. For centuries these were covered with tule mats: Later the Indians acquired canvas through trade with non-Indians. With the acquisition of horses during the 1700s, the Methows wintered in warmer areas in order to pasture their livestock. By the time of white settlement, smallpox had drastically reduced the population of the Northwest tribes, including the Methows.

In 1871, the remaining Methows, along with many other tribes of the Columbia Plateau, were assigned to the Colville Reservation. Later, through the efforts of Chief Moses (b. ca. 1829), the federal government agreed to the creation of a reservation specifically for the Methows and adjacent Columbia Plateau tribes. Thus in 1879, Columbia (or Moses) Reservation was created, but Moses and his people never moved onto it. The reservation itself was as short-lived as portions of the Colville Reservation coveted by white miners and settlers.

In 1883, the government removed the Columbia Reservation from maps, and on May 1, 1886, the lush, beautiful Methow Valley was opened to white settlement. Much to the dissatisfaction of other tribes already on the Colville Reservation, Moses and his people were moved there. Yet as late as the 1940s, some of the Methows continued their seasonal migrations to traditional fishing, hunting, and gathering areas now occupied, though sparsely, by white settlers. Although there was an “Indian scare” in 1891, written memoirs and oral histories of the old-time settlers recall basically amicable interactions between the two peoples.

Founding a Town and Getting There

Fur traders, trappers, and then miners made their circuitous way into the Methow Valley and the mountains surrounding it. Arriving in 1886, trapper brothers Tom and Jim Robinson were the first known white settlers in the area that became Winthrop. The next were James Sullivan and his wife Louisa Heckendorn Sullivan, who arrived in 1887, settling an area adjacent to present Winthrop that came to be called Heckendorn and is now part of the town. The Sullivans also built the first hotel in Winthrop. Walter Frisbee arrived in 1888 and eventually set up a blacksmith shop, a trading post, and a photography shop. Next came the homesteaders intent on establishing small farms and permanent communities. The early settlers found land and climate conducive to cattle ranching, and there was a ready market for beef in the nearby mining operations or for shipment to Seattle via Wenatchee. As pioneer Flora Jones recalled, “Food for the family was raised and prepared for winter and hay for stock. There was no market for anything except beef” (Rohn, 5).

Few regions of Washington were as isolated as the Methow Valley. The Cascade Mountains presented an almost insurmountable barrier on three sides. Although the Indians had developed routes west to the coast, they were not practical for settlers with wagons loaded with goods and families. From the east, there was no trail along the Methow River from the Columbia because, during part of its course, the river flowed between steep canyon walls. Some settlers took the train to Spokane, Sprague, or Ellensburg and came overland from there, a route that involved a horrendous crossing of the Columbia. One such settler was Guy Waring, founder of Winthrop, who brought his family to Washington twice, in 1884 and in 1891. His stepdaughter, Anna Greene Stevens, later recalled both crossings of the Columbia River. During the first:

“We spent five days alone crossing the Columbia River, a perilous and awesome undertaking. The river, undimmed in those days, boiled downstream at an unbelievable speed. Indian dugouts were used to make the crossing. They were hollowed-out logs with the bark still on them. There was no bow or stern. They were treacherous, and only the extreme skill of the three Indian paddlers made the crossing possible. The covered wagons had to be taken completely apart and carried across in pieces. Two dugouts were tied together to accomplish this feat” (Portman, 105).

By the time of the family’s 1891 crossing, there was a cable ferry at the site of present Wilbur “that a covered wagon could drive onto, which crossed the river attached to a trolley. The boat, hauled at an angle against the swift current and held by the trolley, sailed across by water pressure” (Portman, 105).

Pioneers arriving over the Chiliwist Trail, an Indian path that became the main link between the Okanogan and Methow valleys, had to ford the Okanogan River and then cross the mountain ranges between the Okanogan and Methow valleys. This former Indian trail was safe by foot, tolerable on horseback, but an almost impassable two and a half days by wagon. Yet a more direct route along the steep-sided Methow River was impossible until, in 1891, settlers from Winthrop, Twisp, and Carlton donated money and their own labor to complete the Bald Knob Route, a primitive road that avoided the canyon cliffs by following the hillsides. It was still so difficult for freighters that another alternative, the narrow Brewster Mountain Road, was completed the same year. It was scary but good enough to enable stagecoach service between Brewster and Winthrop.

A Real Road To Winthrop

Not until 1904, when Walter A. Bolinger was elected to the state legislature, did the idea of a river-level road along the Methow take hold. In 1905 he proposed it as a state highway. With funding from the legislature, the sweat of convict labor, and plenty of dynamite, a river-level road was completed in 1909 from Pateros on the Columbia to Robinson Creek 20 miles beyond Winthrop. In 1905 the Washington State Highway Department was created, and the Methow Valley road was the first highway built by the State of Washington. It was paved by 1938. This road crossed the river at several points. When the disastrous flood of 1948 wiped out all the bridges, the only access east from Winthrop was over the old Brewster Mountain Road until these bridges were repaired.

From its first days, the state road connected with the steamboats that plied the dangerous stretch of the Columbia between Wenatchee and the mouth of the Methow from the early 1890s until 1914. This combination of road and river travel eased the isolation of the region, bringing settlers and supplies into the Methow Valley and transporting the products of their mines, sawmills, and orchards to market. The journey from any part of the valley to Wenatchee now took less than two days! Custom-made wagons transported freight until the first trucks began operating on the route in 1915. During World War II, Joe Lockart of Winthrop introduced a popular passenger bus service between Winthrop and Wenatchee that continued until 1966. For years, beginning in 1916, there was talk that ultimately came to nothing of a spur railroad linking the valley to the outside world. Not until completion of the North Cascades Highway in 1972, was Winthrop connected directly and easily to Western Washington.

Waring and His Trading Co.

In the fall of 1891, Guy Waring, a 32-year-old Harvard graduate, arrived in Winthrop with his wife, Helen Clark Greene Waring (d. 1906), and his three stepchildren. It was his second attempt at settling in the West. His first had been a stint of ranching and storekeeping beginning in 1884 in the Okanogan Valley near the Canadian border. These first Western adventures are described in his My Pioneer Past, published in 1936. Then from 1888 until 1891, Waring and the family were back in Boston.

Upon arrival in Winthrop, Waring housed his family in a tent until completing a log cabin. His helpers soon built a trading post, which Waring opened in January 1892. In 1897, with backing from Eastern investor, it was formally incorporated as the Methow Trading Company. A post office had been created on June 18, 1891, with Charles Look as first postmaster. Waring took over the position in early 1892 and angered some of the locals by requesting that the name of the town be changed to Waring. It already bore the name of Theodore Winthrop (1828-1861), a Yale graduate who had rambled about Washington Territory and in 1853 published Canoe and Saddle describing his adventures.

Although his neighbors nursed some animosity toward Waring, they did welcome his general store, which greatly simplified their access to supplies. Before it opened, the closest source was Coulee City, a four-day round trip by wagon. Residents of Winthrop and the surrounding country continued to patronize his mercantile company for decades. Waring opened additional branches and trading posts at Pateros and Twisp and in several of the mining districts in the surrounding Cascades. However, by 1910, he was overextended and consolidated his mercantile business at Winthrop.

Although most funding of the new corporation came from Boston investors, Waring was elected president and retained almost exclusive control.

Waring soon built his family a larger log home, which locals dubbed “the castle” because of its relative size and commanding position on a hillside overlooking the town. It now houses the Okanogan Historical Society’s Shafer Museum, one of the best regional museums in the state. Waring also established a sawmill and later a gristmill.

In 1897, the Methow Trading Company acquired Waring’s Duck Brand Saloon, although he continued to manage it. Waring had opened the saloon, named for his cattle brand, not because he wished to become a saloonkeeper, but because he wanted to preempt other more disreputable establishments. He had had his fill of violence and drunkenness in the Ruby mining area near Loomis during his previous sojourn in Okanogan County. This saloon, with its strict rules about hours of operation and standards of conduct, further alienated Waring from many of the locals. It was never profitable and closed in 1910. The building that housed the Duck Brand saloon is now Winthrop’s town hall. Today a popular Winthrop restaurant calls itself the Duck Brand.

Twice during his early years in Winthrop, Guy Waring entertained a visitor who would soon become famous: his Harvard classmate Owen Wister, who visited him in 1892 and 1898. Wister became a best selling author in 1902, with his The Virginian, the first true Western novel. Although the setting was Wyoming, there is evidence that some of the characters and incidents are based on people and events Wister encountered in Winthrop.

Waring’s business and Winthrop prosperity temporarily stalled when President Grover Cleveland issued an executive order on February 22, 1897, placing the entire Methow Valley within the Washington Forest Reserve. This edict permitted residents to remain but prohibited future settlement. Waring and others mounted a vigorous protest, arguing that, unlike the surrounding mountains, the Methow Valley was agricultural and did not contain forests in need of protection. In 1901, the valley portion was released from the Forest Reserve system. Today the Methow Valley is a corridor of private property mostly surrounded by National Forest land.

Mining had begun in the Harts Pass area northeast of Winthrop when Alex Barron struck gold in 1892. The boomtown shacks of Barron soon housed more than 1,000 people. Waring established a branch store, but the shipment of goods was difficult and unprofitable because the road built to Barron by Colonel W. Thomas Hart (b. 1836) was nearly impassable. Goods and supplies coming up to the mines and ore coming down had to be transferred to pack horses at the point where the trail became too dangerous, narrow, and steep for freight wagons. Gold and silver mining continued off and on in the area, but the resulting trade never contributed much to the prosperity of Winthrop. Many huge pieces of antique mining equipment from the abandoned Harts Pass mines were later transported by helicopter for display on the grounds of the Shafer Museum in Winthrop.

Progress and Difficulty

Waring’s mercantile company, with the investment of Eastern backers, bought up townsite land, and in 1901 platted the town of Winthrop. Lots sold quickly, and Waring and Winthrop entered a period of prosperity. By 1904 David Heckendorn had platted the townsite of Heckendorn a half mile downriver from Winthrop. Chauncey McLean’s general store in Heckendorn competed with Waring’s Methow Company. Winthrop got its first newspaper, the Winthrop Eagle, in 1909. Three year later, it became the Methow Valley Journal. In 1912, the community built a handsome school of locally hewn rock and locally made brick, which was destroyed by a fire on January 1, 1961. In 1924, over some local objection, Winthrop was reincorporated to include Heckendorn and another plot of land, Carl Johnson’s Addition. Roma Johnson was the first mayor. That same year, electricity came to the area, with the Upper Methow Valley Power and Light Company power plant.

Waring’s final and most consuming venture in the Methow Valley was a ranch he bought in 1904. His efforts over the next 12 years to grow apples profitably drained proceeds from the trading company. A drought beginning in 1915 finally doomed the L5 Orchard. By 1916 Waring had lost control of the Methow Trading Company and in 1917 returned to Massachusetts, seemingly a failure. The company struggled on during a protracted liquidation process until 1934 when it was dissolved altogether.

Yet Waring could look back with some nostalgia on his years in the West, recalling at a 1932 Harvard graduation anniversary, “I had a hard but beautiful life for most of the time spent on the frontier but came away with pleasant memories of the climate and with love for the beauty of the country” (Portman, 214, 215). Furthermore, the presence of the Methow Trading Company, although it ultimately failed, contributed to the survival of a precarious community in the remote Methow Valley.

Whether earning a living through agriculture, mining or timber, the residents of the Winthrop area had always worked hard with little to show for it. The onslaughts of nature worsened their situation. There were disastrous floods in 1894 and 1948. The drought that began in 1915 killed more orchards than Guy Waring’s. Even before then, ranchers at Winthrop had attempted irrigation. Although irrigation became a major factor in the lower and central Methow Valley, the early ditches around Winthrop did little more than “turn what would have been starvation ranches into at least a living,” according to pioneer Walter Nickell (Portman, 263). Then a severe freeze in 1968, during which temperatures plunged to 50 below zero, wiped out most of the remaining apple orchards in the upper Methow Valley.

Winthrop's Revival

Winthrop desperately needed a revival. It came about for two reasons: the completion in 1972 of the North Cascades Highway, which “became popular with Puget Sound-area tourists who thrilled to its expansive alpine vistas,” (Pigott, 125) and the restoration of the town’s business district to a Western theme. Even before completion of the highway, Otto Wagner, lumberman and sawmill operator, and his wife Kathryn (Kay) had proposed the idea. Otto Wagner did not live to see the realization of the project, but Kay carried it through to completion. She hired Leavenworth architect Robert Jorgensen, artists and builders local merchants all contributed generously to the restoration of Winthrop. The process involved meticulous research of local historic photographs and travel to see examples of other Western towns.

The goal was authenticity, not a Hollywood set. The frontier theme town was ready for the first Western Washington tourists to arrive over the North Cascades Highway. Yet Kay Wagner’s objective was never strictly tourism: “I don’t like to call it a tourist attraction,” she said. “This is a living town. People live in it. They aren’t tourist attractions” (Portman, 200).

Since the 1970s, many who visited Winthrop and the Methow Valley decided to stay. Vacation getaways and year-round homes of retirees have sprung up around Winthrop and throughout the valley. The impact of these people is not just economic. Energetic retirees, whether lifelong residents or newcomers, provide volunteer staffing for the museum, the library, the information center, and such annual events as the superb Methow Chamber Music Festival.

The nonprofit Methow Conservancy, with headquarters in Winthrop, is dedicated to “inspiring people to care for the land of the Methow Valley” by means of conservation easements that have protected 18.3 miles of critical riparian shoreline habitat along the Methow River and its tributaries. These easements “help families keep their farms and ranches and protect the open space and scenic views that regularly draw tens of thousands of visitors to the Valley” (Methow Conservancy website). Winthrop hums along within this beautiful valley that Owen Wister called “a smiling country, winning the heart at sight” (Portman, 11).

The State of Washington
Washington Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation

Winthrop, Okanogan County, May 11, 1914

Photo by Asahel Curtis and Walter P. Miller, Courtesy Washington State Historical Society (1943.42.30095)

Steamboat plying the Columbia River between Wenatchee and Pateros, 1910s

Courtesy Shafer Historical Museum

Methow Valley with curve of Methow River at right, May 11, 1914

Photo by Asahel Curtis and Walter P. Miller, Courtesy Washington State Historical Society (1943.42.30078)


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