Hubert Plumer

Hubert Plumer

Herbert Plumer was born in 1857. He served in Sudan (1884) and led the army that relieved Mafeking during the Boer War (1899-1901).

On the outbreak of the First World War Plumer was placed in command of the II Corps of the British Expeditionary Force. In May 1915 was promoted to commander of the Second Army on the Western Front and was responsible for the sector around Ypres until the autumn of 1917.

Plumber was sent to the Italy in November 1917 but was recalled to France in the autumn of 1918 to take part in the final stages of the war on the Western Front.

Plumber was made a field marshal in 1919 and served as Governor of Malta (1919-24) and High Commissioner of Palestine (1925-28).

Sir Herbert Plumer died in 1932.

The only general who had some personal affection from the men was old Plumer commanding the Second Army. A stout little old man, with a walrus moustache and a plump little belly below his belt. He was very active and went about his lines looking after the comfort of the men and talking to them in trenches and billets.


Plumer versus Gough

Herbert Plumer and Hubert Gough were two military commanders who differed dramatically in their styles.

Plumber was Officer Commanding the Second Army based within the Ypres Salient for most of World War One, while Gough had rapidly ascended the military ladder to become the Commander of the 5th Army. It was during the Allied attack on German positions to the southeast of Ypres in 1917 when the stark contrast between the two came to light.

General Haig made his plans for the Western Front clear in 1917. He was tasked by the Admiralty with clearing the Belgian coast of German occupation, particularly areas such as Zeebruge and Ostend, so that German U-boats could stop using their submarine bases. Haig was happy to oblige, and also set into motion his own plans to secure an Allied success in the Ypres Salient in order to reduce the options for the Germans based in the area and encourage them to retreat. He hoped this would encourage strong German forces to retreat too, and this would make it easier for Haig’s cavalry regiments to target the German troops.

The plan was based around an attack by two large armies. This first was the Second Army under General Herbert Plumer, who planned to attack the Messines Ridge. Aware of the casualties that had occurred around the Ypres Salient during the war, his philosophy for the campaign was to ‘waste metal, not flesh’. He had even tested the time it took for debris to land following explosions, so that infantry would not be harmed when they rushed to attack the Germans. The second army was based north of Plumer’s - Hubert Gough’s 5th Army.

Part of Plumer’s army was tasked by Haig with capturing Gheluvelt Plateau, with the help of Gough’s army. Haig saw this as a joint offensive that would be key to the whole attack - particularly as the failure of the two armies to meet in the middle would leave a large gap of German troops who would be able to attack from the rear.

Scenes from the Battle of Messines

Historians disagree on who was responsible for the events that took place after the attack was ordered, but it is clear that Haig’s plans never came to light. Many argue that Gough simply did not believe that he should share the attack on the Gheluvit Plateau with Plumber, seeing it as something that could only be achieved using his 5th army. His close relationship with Haig may have been responsible for this opinion.

Records suggest that men from the Second and Eighth Corps of Plumer’s army went on scouting patrols on 8th June around Gheluvelt Plateau, but came up against strong German resistance. Plumber asked Haig for three days so he could bring more artillery and men up ahead of the major assault on the plateau. However, Haig did not support this idea, and many believe this is a result of his belief that Plumer - a huge success in the Messines - did not require more time to be successful and was concerned that they would lose their advantage if they waited.

Haig responded on 9th June by transferring the Second and Eighth Corps to Gough’s 5th Army and ordering an attack on Gheluvelt Plateau to secure the ridge east of Ypres. However, the attack never went ahead.

Instead, on 14th June, Haig’s senior officers met at Lillers and Gough announced that he had concluded an attack on the plateau would have placed troops in danger, and that if they had failed the Germans could have retaken Ypres itself, which was the heart of the Allied campaign in the Salient. Other disagreed, stating that the attack must take place to ensure the German lines were weakened. However, Haig apparently listened to Gough and the attack on the plateau was pushed back to “a later date”.

While a major success at battles such as Messines Ridge, some military historians argue that if Gough had followed his instructions the attack would have had a more devastating impact on the German front line and could have led to a shortening of the war. In fact, historian Robin Neillands refers to the decision as a “tragic mistake” - evidence suggests that the Germans feared a successful Allied attack on the plateau as the Allies would have had the higher ground. With this advantage, the Allied artillery could have been devastating on the Germans and they may have been forced to retreat, as Haig had initially planned.


Obituary/Memoir

The Secretary reported with regret the death of James Marshall Plumer, Associate Professor of Far Eastern Art, on June 15, 1960. The following memoir was adopted:

James Marshall Plumer, Associate Professor of Far Eastern Art, died suddenly June the fifteenth in Concord, New Hampshire.

Professor Plumer was born in Newton Centre, Massachusetts, in 1899, and educated at St. Paul's School, the Boston Latin School, and Harvard University.

In 1923 he entered the employ of the Chinese Government in the department of Maritime Customs, and served in port cities from Tientsin to Foochow and in such inland transportation centers as Hankow and Mukden. During this period he became conversant with Chinese language and culture generally and closely studied Chinese ceramic art, visiting Buddhist cave temples in the northwestern provinces and exploring original kiln sites in Fukien and Chekiang. On leave from his post, he taught Chinese language at Harvard and acted as Secretary of the Harvard-Yencheng Institute.

In 1935 he joined the University of Michigan faculty as a Lecturer in Far Eastern Art. The University appointed him associate professor in 1941. His subsequent career embraced terms of public service as organizer of the China Unit of the Army Map Service during the Second World War, and as fine arts adviser to General MacArthur in Tokyo in 1948-49. Ten years later, by special invitation of the Chief Abbot of Horyu-ji Monastery and the former Marquis Hosokawa, he represented The University of Michigan, the Fogg Museum of Art, the Freer Gallery of Art, and Harvard University at the unveiling of a monument to the late Professor Langdon Warner of Harvard at the Horyu-ji in Nara, Japan.

At that time Professor Plumer was bringing to completion Professor Warner's unfinished lifework, Japanese Sculpture of the Tempyo Period. Death tragically prevented Professor Plumer from completing his own work on "Chinese Chien or Temmoku Ware: Its Origin, Nature and Influence on Later Ceramics." A stimulating teacher as well as a capable scholar, he lectured widely at universities and art museums throughout the country. His colleagues honored him as well for his humane interests and temperament as for his technical proficiency.

The Regents of the University mourn the early loss of this gifted and good man, and tender to his family their profoundest sympathy.


There are 4 census records available for the last name Plubert. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Plubert census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1 immigration records available for the last name Plubert. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Plubert. For the veterans among your Plubert ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 4 census records available for the last name Plubert. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Plubert census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 1 immigration records available for the last name Plubert. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Plubert. For the veterans among your Plubert ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Germans

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Plumer versus Gough

Herbert Plumer and Hubert Gough were two very different types of military commanders. Plumer was Officer Commanding the II Army based within the Ypres Salient for the bulk of World War One while Gough had made swift progress up the promotions ladder – much to the consternation of some of his compatriots – and was given command of the V Army. The two styles of command came out into the open during the Allied attack on German positions to the southeast of Ypres in the summer of 1917. While a major success at places such as Messines Ridge, some military historians, such as Robin Neillands, argue that if Gough had followed his instructions for what the troops under his command were required to do in the overall strategic plan, the attack would have had a more devastating impact on the German front line and could have led to a shortening of the war.

Haig’s overall strategic plan for the Western Front in 1917 was quite clear. The Admiralty wanted him to clear the Belgian coast of any German occupation – especially the towns Zeebruge and Ostend – as this would have stopped German U-boats from using their submarine bases there. It seems that Haig was happy to accommodate this requirement. Secondly, Haig believed that an Allied success in the Ypres Salient gave the Germans based near there few options as to what to do – retreat being the most obvious. This lack of options was less true with regards to German land forces based elsewhere along the Western Front. From Haig’s point of view, once a retreat started, there was always the potential for it turning into a rout. Also a retreating army would have been a much easier target for Haig’s cavalry regiments, which had spent months effectively operating as infantry units within the Salient.

Haig’s plan was based around an attack by two large armies. The first was the II Army commanded by General Herbert Plumer. Plumer’s plan of attack on Messines Ridge was meticulously thought out. Plumer was acutely conscious of the casualties that had occurred in the Ypres Salient during the war and his byword for this attack was ‘waste metal, not flesh’. He even had tests done to time how long it would take for the debris to land that would be thrown in the air by the huge explosions that occurred at the very start of the attack – just in case it could be harmful to the infantry on the ground when they rushed the German defences.

The other army that carried out Haig’s attack was based north of Plumer’s. This was Hubert Gough’s V Army – the ‘Northern Army’ – some historians refer to Plumer’s army as the ‘Southern Army’ as opposed to the II Army.

Part of Plumer’s army based at the northern tip of its front line was tasked by Haig with capturing Gheluvelt Plateau. They were to be assisted by men from Gough’s V Army that were based at the very southern tip of his front line. Therefore Haig envisaged the taking of Gheluvelt Plateau as a joint operation between the II and V armies. He also saw its success as being key to the whole attack as success in the north and south but failure in the middle sector would have left the Allies advancing east but leaving behind them a substantial German force that could attack them in their rear if not successfully dealt with. The day before the attack Haig contacted Gough and urged him to prosecute an energetic assault as he anticipated that Plumer would attack in this manner.

Who was responsible for what happened next is difficult to know but Haig’s anticipated attack never occurred. Plumer never wrote about his wartime experiences nor did he discuss them in a public manner. After the war Gough did write about his experiences in World War One but many saw the book – ‘Fifth Army’ – as nothing more than an attempt to explain what he did as a commander. Therefore there has never been a clear explanation as to what happened.

However, it does seem that Gough did not believe that he should share the attack on Gheluvelt Plateau with Plumer. He saw it as an attack that could only be done by the V Army. His close relationship with Haig may have been one of the reasons to explain what happened next.

Men from II and VIII Corps of Plumer’s II Army went on scouting patrols on the Gheluvelt Plateau on June 8 th . They came up against strong German resistance. Plumer asked Haig for a three-day period during which he could bring up artillery and more men to launch the anticipated major assault on the plateau. Haig did not support the idea that there should be a three-day delay in the attack. Ironically Plumer was a victim of his own success. The attack and advance beyond Messines had been a huge success. The Allies advanced over 9000 metres in the day and actually went beyond their target for the first day of the attack. This to Haig was where success could be found – continuous assaults so that the enemy never had time to consolidate or counter-attack. Now Plumer was asking for three days to organise the attack on the plateau – three days during which, Haig assumed, the Germans would thoroughly strengthen their defences there.

Haig’s response on June 9 th was to transfer II and VIII Corps to Gough’s V Army. Haig ordered an attack on Gheluvelt Plateau “to secure the ridge east of Ypres”. The attack never went ahead.

On June 14 th , Haig’s senior officers met at Lillers. Here Gough announced that he had concluded that an attack on the plateau would have placed the troops involved in great danger such were the extent of the German defences. Gough argued that if his army failed on the plateau, Ypres itself would have been in danger of falling to the Germans. As the heart of the Allied campaign in the Salient, Ypres could not be allowed to fall and to some there was a great deal of logic in what Gough argued. Others, however, had other views about his decision that were not in his favour. It would appear that Haig listened to what Gough had to say and supported his belief that both V and II Armies should coordinate an attack on the plateau “at the later date”.

Neillands refers to this decision as a “tragic mistake”. Evidence shows that the Germans greatly feared a successful Allied attack on Gheluvelt Plateau, as the Allies would then have held the bulk of the higher ground around the German armies based there. With this advantage Allied artillery could have been devastating against entrenched German positions and they may well have been forced to retreat – just as Haig had previously planned.


Sir Herbert Charles Onslow Plumer

British Army general. Born on March 13, 1857, at Kensington, England, Herbert Charles Onslow Plumer was educated at Eton. After scoring a high grade on the entrance examination to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, he was commissioned directly to the 65th Regiment of Foot in 1876. Promoted to captain in 1882, Plumer served in the Sudan Campaign of 1884–1885 and, as a brevet lieutenant colonel, in the Matabele Campaign of 1896. During the South African War (Second Boer War, 1899–1902), he commanded a mounted infantry regiment in the relief of Mafeking (May 1900) and a column during antiguerrilla operations.

Breveted colonel in 1900 and promoted to major general in 1902, Plumer commanded a brigade and then was appointed quartermaster general to the forces in 1904. In 1906 he received command of the 5th Division in Ireland, and in 1908 he was promoted to lieutenant general. In 1911 Plumer took over the Northern Command.

During World War I, Plumer was ordered to France to take command of the newly formed V Corps in early 1915. He served in the Second Battle of Ypres (April 22–May 25, 1915) and that May was appointed to command the Second Army in place of General Horace Smith-Dorrien. Plumer was promoted to full general in June 1915. Through 1915 and 1916, Plumer’s army held portions of the line but was not involved in the major offensives or battles.

After meticulous preparation, Plumer achieved a limited but complete victory at the Battle of Messines (June 7, 1917). The attack made heavy use of mining, artillery, tanks, and gas to support the attack of nine infantry divisions against Messines Ridge. The objectives of the attack were all achieved by midafternoon, with far fewer casualties than had been expected. German counterattacks were easily repulsed, and the British continued their attacks for an additional week, by which time the entire Messines salient had been occupied.

In the Third Battle of Ypres (July 31–November 19, 1917), Plumer attacked in support of the main British effort carried out by General Sir Hubert Gough’s Fifth Army. After Gough suffered heavy casualties and had made only limited progress, during September–October British Expeditionary Force commander Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig shifted the main effort in the offensive to Plumer’s Second Army. Plumer chose to launch a series of carefully planned small-scale attacks and made gains in the battles at Menin Road (September 20–25), Polygon Wood (September 26), and Broodseinde (October 4). Further attacks later in October in the Battle of Poelcappelle (October 9) and the First and Second Battles of Passchendaele (October 12 and October 26–November 10), however, were costly failures that did not achieve their objectives.

Shortly before the Passchendaele offensive came to an end, in November 1917 Plumer was ordered to Italy to assist Italian forces in restoring the situation following the disastrous Italian defeat at Caporetto (October 24–November 9). The front was stabilized by the Italians at the Piave River before Plumer arrived, though. On December 3, Plumer’s force of six French and five British divisions took over a sector of the Italian front. While in Italy, Plumer established excellent relations with the Italian generals, working to steady their resolve as they rebuilt the Italian Army.

In February 1918 Prime Minister David Lloyd George offered the position of chief of the Imperial General Staff to Plumer in place of General Sir William Robertson, but Plumer declined the offer primarily out of loyalty to Robertson. Plumer returned to France in March 1918 and resumed command of the Second Army.

The brunt of the first of the German Ludendorff (Spring) Offensives launched that same month fell on the British Third and Fifth Armies. Plumer was called upon to release several divisions to reinforce the embattled portions of the British lines. The second German attack, the Lys Offensive (April 9–29), was directed against the front held by Plumer’s forces. Although severely pressed by the Germans, Plumer maintained a steady grip on the situation and only grudgingly gave ground.

Despite being Haig’s most experienced and reliable army commander, Plumer played only a subsidiary role in the Allied offensives of the autumn of 1918. His army operated outside of British command under Belgian king Albert’s army group. As part of the Allied army group, Plumer served in the Courtrai Offensive in October 1918. After the armistice, Plumer’s army was charged with crossing the German frontier and establishing the British zone of occupation in Germany.

In 1919 Plumer was promoted to field marshal and appointed governor and commander in chief of Malta. In 1925 he was selected as high commissioner for Palestine. Created Baron Plumer of Messines and Bilton in 1919, he was raised to viscount in 1929. Plumer died in London on July 16, 1932. Unlike other British generals of the war, Plumer only attempted to achieve what was realistically feasible and never undertook blindly optimistic operations.

Further Reading

Harington, Charles. Plumer of Messines. London: J. Murray, 1935.

Powell, Geoffrey. Plumer, the Soldier’s General: A Biography of Field-Marshal Viscount Plumer of Messines. London: Leo Cooper, 1990.

Prior, Robin, and Trevor Wilson. Passchendaele: The Untold Story. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1996.


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James Plumer

James PLUMMER was reared in Westmoreland County, and came here in 1815. Long before coming into Adams Township, he had a strong desire to make for himself a permanent home in this county. He purchased his land from Alexander HAYES, from near Whitestown, paying him $6 per acre for it. He at once set to work with a hearty good will to diminish the forests and break up the fallow-ground. During the first few years, he was not at all successful in obtaining large crops, suffering the same inconvenience experienced by many others of that day--that of not having the necessary implements with which to cultivate the stubborn soil. However, he did not fold his arms in sullen disappointment. He toiled on as many others of the pioneers did, in the hope and expectation of better success in the future.

His wife was Nancy STEEL, of Fayette County, who bore him eight children--Jonathan, Mary, Elizabeth, William, James, Ann, Thomas and Jane. James PLUMMER died in 1828, January 12, in the sixty-second year of his age. His son, James, now in his seventy-fifth year, is spending his last days on part of the same farm owned by his father, and which he owned up to 1854, when he sold it to Esquire HUTCHMAN, and removed to Bakerstown. After remaining there twelve years, he went to Beaver County, but tiring of that county he finally came back to Adams Township, and purchased from Mr. HUTCHMAN five acres of the old farm. His great-grandfather was [p.194] among the noble band of 101 who fled from England to this country on account of religious persecution, sailing in the "Mayflower." Several times he had his property burned by the Indians, near where Pittsburgh now is. He is said to have tanned the first leather and distilled the first liquor west of the Allegheny Mountains, using a copper kettle for the still and the barrel of a shot-gun for the worm.

from: History of Butler County, 1883, available at: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/

In the old cemetery lot on which the Middlesex Presbyterian church building stands are many nameless graves. Some, marked by common sandstone monuments, are made impressive by their simplicity. The greater number of graves, however, are designated by old-time marble headstones, and many of them by modern marble monuments. Among the dead who inhabit this silent city the following may be mentioned: Robert LINN, Sr. 1816 Edward BYRNE, 1816 Benjamin LINN, 1817 John REESE, 1842 James BYRNE, 1826: James PLUMMER and Sarah DAVID, 1828 Fanny PARK, 1829 Sarah CAMPBELL, 1830 A. MCCASLIN and Margaret C. THOMPSON, 1830 Joseph WELSH and Jane LINN, 1831 John M. BROWN, 1833: Sarah LINN, 1833 Catherine HARPER, Jesse SUTTON and James CRITCHLOW, 1834 James BYRNE and Elizabeth FLICK, 1835 James CAMPBELL, 1836 James POTTS, 1837 Margaret CAMPBELL and Martha WHITE, 1838 David BURNS, 1839 Henry SEFTON, 1840 Margaret CAMPBELL, 1841 Absalom MONKS, 1842 James HARBISON, 1843 Elizabeth LYON, 1844 Mary NORTON, 1845 Thomas HARPER and Elizabeth DAVID, 1846 William KENNEDY, 1847 Hannah H. BROWN, 1848 Catherine BROWN, 1849 Sarah WELSH and Elizabeth MORRISON, 1850 George BOYD, 1851 John LYON, 1852 Elizabeth BOYD, John BROWN and Margaret CAMPBELL, 1853 Margaret REESE, Mary THOMPSON and Mary A. LUCE, 1858 James BROWN, 1859 Jane SEFTON and William HUNTER, 1861 Capt. Edwin LYON, 1862 Mary HARBISOn, 1865 Rachel BRITTANIN, 1866 Hannah POTTS, 1867 Mary BROWn, 1868 Ruth LYON and John DUNBAR, 1869 Ezekiel DAVID, 1871 and Jane DAVID, 1872.

From History of Butler County, 1895, available at

William CAMPBELL, the bear hunter, may be credited with settlement in 1796. He had 300 acres of land, but he devoted his time to hunting rather than to agriculture. James PLUMMER, a settler of 1796, sold his four hundred acres on Crab run to George MATTHEWS, in 1813, and moved to some other part of the county. Abdiel and Andrew McCLURE located here in 1796. Both were natives of Ireland and the former a soldier of the Revolution, while Robert, his son, was a wagoner in the War of 1812.


Plummer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Plummer is rooted in the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. It was originally a name for someone who worked as a seller of plumes and feathers. Occupational names that were derived from the common trades of the medieval era transcended European cultural and linguistic boundaries. Occupational names have remained fairly commonplace in the modern period. This is attested to by the continuing appearance of occupational suffixes at the end of many English surnames. Some of these suffixes include: herd, monger, maker, hewer, smith and wright.

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Early Origins of the Plummer family

The surname Plummer was first found in Durham where they held a family seat from early times. The family name Plummer first appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

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Early History of the Plummer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Plummer research. Another 95 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1190, 1686, 1767, 1736 and 1822 are included under the topic Early Plummer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Plummer Spelling Variations

It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Plummer are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages, even literate people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Plummer include Plumer, Plummer, Plumber and others.

Early Notables of the Plummer family (pre 1700)

Another 34 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Plummer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Plummer migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Plummer Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Francis Plummer, who landed in New England in 1633 [1]
  • Samuel Plummer, who arrived in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1641 [1]
  • John Plummer, who arrived in Virginia in 1642
  • Joseph Plummer, who landed in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1652 [1]
  • Joe Plummer, who settled in Virginia in 1653
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Plummer Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Mary Plummer, who arrived in Virginia in 1701 [1]
  • John Plummer, who arrived in Maryland in 1739
Plummer Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • William Plummer, who arrived in New York in 1833 [1]
  • Charles Plummer, who arrived in New York in 1843 [1]
  • John A Plummer, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851 [1]
  • Israel Plummer, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1871 [1]
  • James Plummer, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1871 [1]

Plummer migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Plummer Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Charles Plummer, English convict who was convicted in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England for life for highway robbery, transported aboard the "Champion" on 24th May 1827, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[2]
  • Harriett Plummer, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Mitchell" in 1840 [3]
  • Thomas Plummer, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "William Mitchell" in 1840 [3]
  • Miss Catherine Plummer who was convicted in Plymouth, Devon, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Cadet" on 4th September 1847, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [4]
  • Joseph Plummer, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Sir Edward Parry" in 1849 [5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Plummer migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Plummer Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Plummer, Australian settler travelling from Sydney, Australia aboard the ship "Bristolian" arriving in Auckland, New Zealand in 1842 [6]
  • Frederick Plummer, aged 21, a labourer, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Oliver Lang" in 1856
  • Frederick Plummer, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Pegasus" in 1865

Contemporary Notables of the name Plummer (post 1700) +

  • Christopher Plummer CC (1929-2021), Canadian Academy Award winning, two-time Emmy Award winning, two-time Tony Award winning actor, best known for his role as Captain von Trapp in The Sound of Music
  • Charles Plummer (1851-1927), English historian who first coined the phrase 'bastard feudalism', best known for editing Sir John Fortescue's The Governance of England
  • Henry Crozier Keating Plummer (1875-1946), English astronomer from Oxford, son of William Edward Plummer (1849�)
  • Calvin Plummer (b. 1963), English former professional footballer from Nottingham
  • Christopher Scott "Chris" Plummer (b. 1976), English former professional footballer, and former manager of Conference North
  • Tristan Daine Plummer (b. 1990), English footballer
  • Andrew Plummer (b. 1989), English football player
  • Glenn E. Plummer (b. 1961), American Black Reel Award winning film and television actor
  • Norman Plummer (1924-1999), British Royal Air Force officer and footballer during the war he was a navigator in the Lancaster bombers serving in the Far East and in Europe
  • Henry Plummer (1832-1864), American sheriff of what became Bannack, Montana, hanged without a egal system trial by the controversial Montana Vigilantes
  • . (Another 8 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Plummer family +

Air New Zealand Flight 901
  • Miss Hilda Francis Plummer (1927-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Hamilton, North Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus she died in the crash [7]
  • Mr. Alexander Francis Plummer (1894-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus he died in the crash [7]
RMS Lusitania

Related Stories +

The Plummer Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Consulto et audacter
Motto Translation: With prudence and daring.


Watch the video: The Plumber Reviews Movies