Kawishiwi AO-146 - History

Kawishiwi AO-146 - History

Kawishiwi

River in Minnesota.

(AO-146. dp. 11,600; 1. 655'; b. 86'; dr. 35'; s. 20 k.; cpl.
254; a. 2 5", 6 3"; cl. Neosho)

Kawishiwi (AO-146) was launched 11 December 1954 by New York Ship Building Corp., Camden, N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. Edmund T. Wooldridge; and commissioned 6 July 1955, Captain Joseph B. Swain in command.

Kawishiwi cleared Philadelphia 18 November 1955, and arrived at home port Long Beach 8 December for shakedown training. Upon completion of the training, she departed Long Beach 25 April 1956 to replenish ships of the 7th Fleet. She remained in the Far East on refueling operations until returning to Long Beach 10 October.

During 1957 the oiler divided the year into refueling duties in the Far East and operations out of Long Beach. Kawishiwi arrived Pearl Harbor, her home port, 21 January 1958, and 1 month later sailed for her third Westpac deployment. Her ability to refuel ships at a rapid rate increased the mobility of the U.S. 7th Fleet as it protected peace in the Par East.

Kawishiwi sailed once again 18 November, after a 5 month interval of Hawaiian exercises, for duty with the service force in the Far East. Carrier task groups were then operating off Taiwan, as the Chinese Nationalist held islands Quemoy-Matsu appeared in danger. The 7th Fleet served notice of America's intention to resist aggression blunting another Communist probe to test the Free World's determination. The oiler returned Pearl Harbor 23 March 1959 and resumed Hawaiian operations.

Her next Westpac cruise in August was also in the midst of Communist pressure, this time at Laos. However, the show of strength by the United States averted a crisis, and, after completing refueling duties, the oiler arrived Pearl Harbor 23 November. She sailed again 3 May 1960 on her sixth Westpac deployment, replenishing ships of the Taiwan patrol before returning to Hawaii 22 August.

Following replenishment operations In Hawaiian waters, Kawishiwi departed 6 February 1961 for 7th Fleet services. In addition to standing watch over the tense situation in Laos, the Fleet engaged in SEATO exercises in April. The oiler returned home 26 June for a 4-month respite before another Par East four commencing 23 October. She fueled units of the 7th Fleet as the need for peacekeeping missions by the Navy intensified. Kawishiwi returned Pearl Harbor 27 February 1962 for overhaul.

From 17 September 1962 to 5 February 1963, she engaged in another Far East deployment with the 7th Fleet. During October she replenished many ships participating in amphibious exercises off Okinawa. Kawishiwi returned home 5 February and operated in Hawaiian waters throughout the year engaging in exercises and replenishment duties. As military operations in Vietnam grew in intensity, her duty in the Orient concentrated more and more on refueling the Navy's ships which were fighting Communist aggression in Southeast Asia. After devoting most of the first half of 1966 to servicing ships off Vietnam, she returned to Pearl Harbor 15 July. Operations in the mid-Pacific ensued until she headed back to the Western Pacific 27 March 1967. Kaiwishiwi arrived Subic Bay 12 April and fueled the ships of the mighty 7th Fleet thru mid-1967.


Kawishiwi AO-146 - History

SEVENTEEN MILES inland from the Gulf of Mexico along the deep-water ship channel that breaks through the long barrier island of San Padre and into and past Laguna Madre Bay at Port Isabel, you arrive at the busy ship recycling yards of Brownsville, Texas where “dead ships” are taken apart at the end of their useful lives.

International Shipbreaking Ltd is one of several companies that make their living here by dismantling and recycling maritime vessels. Others include Marine Metal Inc. All Star Metal LLC, Esco Marine Inc., and Bay Bridge Texas, LLC.

Together they specialize in recovering various ferrous products such as plate and structural steel, re-roll plate, cast iron, sheet metal, scrap products and non-ferrous products including aluminum, brass, copper, cupro-nickel and lead as well as reusable equipment and features such as propulsion systems, generators, engines, anchors, chain, furniture, electrical fixtures, galley equipment, beds, lockers and the complex variety of reusable materials left aboard ships at the end of their service.

One of those ships was ex-Navy fleet oiler KAWISHIWI, sold to International Shipbreaking on May 1, 2014 for $866,000.

Sixty-one years prior, on October 5, 1953, her keel had been laid at New York Shipbuilding Co. in Camden, New Jersey. Her major construction completed, she was christened by Mrs. Edmund T. Wooldridge and nobly launched on December 11, 1954, later commissioned on July 6, 1955 as USS KAWISHIWI (AO-146), her name derived from an American Indian name for a river in Minnesota.

Her original home port was Long Beach, California where she arrived after a voyage from the East Coast via the Panama Canal. Pearl Harbor was later home to KAWASHIWI and her crew from January 1968.

KAWISHIWI and her six sister ships of the NEOSHO-class were fast, 655 foot-long fleet oilers, 86 feet at the beam with a draft of 35 feet and displacing 38,500 long tons when loaded to capacity. KAWISHIWI and her sisters were each designed to be commanded, manned and operated by a complement of 323 Naval officers and crew and propelled by two geared steam turbines with two boilers and twin screws that produced a cruising speed of 20 knots.

The NEOSHO-class were the first oilers built specifically as naval oilers (rather than being converted from civilian tankers) for the U.S. Navy after World War II and they were engineered to provide underway fuel replenishment for Navy ships at sea.

New crew and occasional visitors were proudly welcomed aboard with a printed brochure which began:

“Welcome aboard the USS Kawishiwi (AO-146), one of the mighty, super-oilers servicing the United States Pacific Fleet, providing vital petroleum products to aircraft carrier and destroyer alike, and enabling Fleet units to remain at sea for weeks, or even months, at a time without having to port or refuel.

We are honored to have you aboard our fine ship, and we hope that your visit with us will be pleasant and interesting.”

“Kawishiwi is one of a group of six sister ships commonly known as Navy super-oilers, three of which serve in the Pacific as vital members of the logistical life-line that keeps the Fleet mobile and ready to meet any challenge. “

“Our ship is designed for high speed replenishment of the fuel needs of today’s far-flung naval forces. This highly specialized evolution of underway replenishment can be carried on during daylight hours or under cover of night, and is not necessarily limited to the transfer of fuel and petroleum products it can and does provide the capability of transferring to receiving ship’s cargo, mail, passengers, and provisions, in addition to the primary products. These primary items are black oil, aviation gasoline, and jet fuel it is not at all unusual to be pumping these three products simultaneously by making use of the four completely independent fueling rigs on each side of the ship.”

As are all ships at sea, KAWISHIWI was a functioning, full-service working community afloat. Her generators produced enough electric power to meet all of their needs, there was a laundry, clothing store, soda fountain, ship’s store, library, Post Office, bakery, machine shop, barber shop, hospital and even a hobby shop.

The ship carried the “most modern”, and certainly welcomed aboard, movie projection equipment available at the time, and nightly movies aboard were part of the ship’s routine both at sea and in port.

KAWISHIWI was early on deployed to the Western Pacific and involved in the growing conflict that was then developing in Southeast Asia.

From 1965 through 1972, much of her career was spent in waters off the coast of Vietnam, supporting Operation Market Time, the US Navy’s attempt to curtail transport by sea of supplies bound for North Vietnamese and NLF (National Liberation Front) forces in South Viet Nam. During that time KAWISHIWI delivered millions of gallons of fuel oil, jet fuel, aviation gasoline and occasional general cargo and sometimes personnel to USN ships operating in the area.

KAWASHIWI and her crew were also frequent visitors to ports and “sailor towns” such as Hong Kong, Singapore, Sattahip and Subic Bay of which her crew have fond and colorful memories.

But after long years of service, KAWISHIWI was finally decommissioned on October 10, 1979 and reassigned to the Military Sealift Command in service with a civilian crew as USNS Kawishiwi (T-AO-146)

KAWISHIWI continued service as a non-combatant ship for another 13 years until finally placed out of service on September 15, 1992, her name struck from the Naval Register on November 7, 1994.

Her title was transfered to MARAD (United States Maritime Administration) on May 1, 1999 for lay up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Suisun Bay, California.

She remained there, moored along Row G, until she was cleared for disposal June 21, 2005 and sold to International Shipbreaking in 2014.

In May 2014 she was removed from her mooring at Row G and towed to Mare Island for cleaning and preparations.

A month later, on June 27, 2014, KAWISHIWI departed Mare Island under tow by Smith Marine’s ocean-going tug CAPT LATHAM, towed to sea as a dead ship bound for Texas via the Panama Canal, transiting the Culebra Cut on July, 25, 2014

KAWISHIWI arrived at the end of her final journey, at International Shipbreaking facilities in Brownsville on August 6, 2014.

And now she is gone, but for the memories of her crews…and others…

FORTY YEARS AGO, on April 30, 1975, Saigon fell to North Vietnamese forces and the last American helicopters lifted off from the rooftop of the American Embassy in Saigon.

On that date, thousands of “at risk” Vietnamese joined the dwindling number of Americans still left in Vietnam to be evacuated by Operation Frequent Wind, a massive gathering of aircraft and ships that became the largest helicopter evacuation in history.

Fleet oiler USS KAWISHIWI was among the Navy’s Task Force 76 off the coast of Viet Nam during that final American operation.

KAWISHIWI was there to provide fuel for ships of the task force, but her proximity made her one of the first ships approached by fleeing refugees.

Officers and crew recall these first small boats coming alongside and tying up to the rails. One crew recalled how calm the water was at that time and marveled at how lucky those fleeing refugees were not to have to fight the heavy seas so common to the South China Sea.

One of the first refugee boats to approach KAWISHIWI was one of the US Navy’s own river craft. As it came along side, KAWISHIWI’s Gunnersmates came running along the deck, armed and ready for anything because the river craft still had .50 Cals onboard.

KAWASHIWI’s Bos’n’smates quickly lowered cargo nets down the side and crew shimmied down to lend a hand, grabbing hold, putting people on their backs when necessary, climbing back up, carrying people to safety aboard the “Mighty K”.

Estimates are that between 200 and 400 people were rescued and brought aboard KAWASHIWI and transported to safety in the Philippines during that operation.

KAWISHWI took the refugees to Subic Bay, to Grande Island at the harbor’s entrance, which became a kind of Ellis Island for those thousands of Vietnamese refugees that found their new beginning there.

After transporting refugees to Grande Island, KAWASHIWI repeatedly returned to station off the coast of Viet Nam, becoming one of the last US Navy ships to leave Vietnamese waters.

KAWISHIWI may be gone now, but she left behind a legacy worth remembering, and she will never be far from the thoughts of those who served aboard her. But she will never be forgotten by those hundreds of Vietnamese refugees who began their new lives with the strong arm of an American sailor lifting them to safety aboard the “Mighty K”.


Kawishiwi AO-146 - History

Hector's wife took this photo in San Diego
while they were on vacation.


1957 -1959:
While still in High School, Hector was a member of the Naval Reserve Unit in Douglas, AZ.

Currently Hector works around the yard, does a lot of walking for exercise and watches a lot of sports.


3-28-2006
John Strom is an old school buddy of mine who lives in Calif. and is a retired Sherrif's Deputy- I haven't seen him in 47 yrs. He was in the Air Force and after he was discharged hired on with the L.A. Sherrif's Dept. he had the luck(?) of having to be involved in the control of the famous "Watts" riots in the early 60's in L.A. He lives in the Victorville area of Calif., out in the desert, and is an outdoorsman- he likes to go four wheeling in a jeep he has. John has a younger brother, Larry Strom, who has a great blogspot about growing up in Douglas , Az., our hometown. Check another site out by Paul Nichols it's http://douglasaz.blogspot.com Larry sure made it good as far as good memories about growing up in Douglas. Larry now lives in Prescott, Az. and is a motorcycle enthusiast.

4-5-2006
In Douglas, 15th takes you out to the east part of town where the high school, a middle school, and an elementary school is at. After 15th extends past the Municipal airport, it changes names and it becomes "Geronimo Trail". this takes you all the way to the New Mexico border (all dirt road once you leave Douglas). About 15 miles after you leave Douglas on this road, you hit the old John Slaughter Ranch(Cochise County Sheriff back in the 1800's). It is now a museum. When I was a kid, my buddies and I would go about 5-6 miles east of Douglas on this road, and then we would go in off the road we would find arrowheads,cavalry buttons,indian grinding bowls, etc. This was because in the old days, the Apache Chief Geronimo lived in the Chiricahua Mountains with his tribe, just north of Douglas, and when the cavalry would chase him, he would run south into Mexico, which is right across from Douglas, and the cavalry woukd have to stop at the border.
I have a friend who still lives in Douglas who was more of an outdoorsman than me, and he had a footlocker filled with arrowheads, cavalry buttons,silverware with the govt. intials stamped into it, grinding stones, and even human skulls(maybe indian or cavalry) that he would find while out in the desert, and all of this he had in his bedroom, locked securely- his brother had the same thing. This friend now has an old antique shop in Douglas named "The Rustic". Geronimo is buried in Oklahoma,where he was put on a reservation after he was captured, but the Arizona Apaches have been trying forever to bring him back to Ariz. to be buried in the land he loved. The other Apache Chief, Cochise, who was also a Chiricahua Apache, like Geronimo, died while free, but no one to this day knows where his body is buried. The cavalry could never capture him 'cause he had a place in the Dragoon Mountains, just north of Tombstone, where he and his warriors would hide and this was/is called Cochise Stronghold(very rugged and steep cliffs). Many stories exist on how/where he died, and where his warriors buried him, but they're all theory.The one that makes more sense to me is one where they say that when he died, his warriors buried him in the valley between Tombstone and the Dragoon Mts.(about 15 miles apart) and that after they buried him, they then ran hundreds of horses back and forth over his grave, so that even after they stopped the horses from running, even the warriors that had just burried him could not tell where the spot was. There is so much history in Cochise County it's unbelievable.
Calvary Cemetery is where Stan Jones is buried. One of the small roads in the cemetery is named after him,as is another one for Marty Robbins, who would visit Douglas many times, as he had a sister who lived there.

John Slaughter died Feb. 16, 1922 (81) buried in Calvary Cemetery, Douglas, Arizona (Cochise County, Arizona Sheriff 1886).

8-18-2007
Toilets in Japan when I was on the "K": Up to date houses had inside toilets, but it was just an outhouse inside the house. There were no sewer lines, so every once in a while, " Binjo Cleaners" had to come in and scoop up all the crap from the bottom of the hole. They were two man teams, and one guy would drop down into all the crap with waist high rubber boots and a bucket and shovel. He would then put all the crap into a bucket, and his buddy topside would pull out the bucket with a rope attached, take it outside, and dump it in an open sewer drain that ran in the neighborhoods, with water constantly running to take the sewage to a sewage plant. It was a smelly sight all the time the partners would take turns dropping down into the toilets to clean them out. How good the pay was I never knew.

I'd like to share this old pic with you, of my time in the Navy. A friend of mine took this pic of me. As you can see, I'm wearing a lot of padding/warm clothing because we were not too far from the Eastern part of the Russian coast. We had left Japan to go back to Pearl Harbor, but at the last minute my ship was ordered to sail North from Japan, and take Sonar soundings of the ocean bottom, all along the coast near Russia, and then toward Alaska to do the same, before heading home to Pearl Harbor. When this pic was taken, it was COLD.

Pic was taken sometime 1960-62 .


This morning, Veteran's Day 2010, my wife Stella and I went to the local annual Veteran's Day parade downtown, and after that we went to the Veteran's Administration Hospital for an annual celebration in memory of all veterans . The Guest Speaker was famous Hollywood actor Ben Vereen, of the movie "Roots" , among others. On his way out Stella and I asked him if he could just give us a few seconds to take a picture, and here it is. In addition to being a great actor, we found out he also has a great voice, as he sang a patriotic song. We have had a GREAT day today!

Vern, here's a trailer of Luis Rolon from the movie Streets of Blood, with Val Kilmer, Sharon Stone, 50¢ ( The Black Rapper). You can see Kilmer about ready to blow Luis' head off in one scene


Kawishiwi AO-146 - History

November - November - Quebec - Delta
Kawishiwi (AO-146) was launched 11 December 1954 by New York Ship Building Corp., Camden, N. J. sponsored by Mrs. Edmund T. Wooldridge and commissioned 6 July 1955, Captain Joseph B. Swain in command. Kawishiwi cleared Philadelphia 18 November 1955, and arrived at home port Long Beach 8 December for shakedown training . Upon completion of the training, she departed Long Beach 25 April 1956 to replenish ships of the 7th Fleet. She remained in the Far East on refueling operations until returning to Long Beach 10 October.

During 1957 the oiler divided the year into refueling duties in the Far East and operations out of Long Beach. Kawishiwi arrived atPearl Harbor, her home port, 21 January 1958, and 1 month later sailed for her third Westpac deployment. Her ability to refuel ships at a rapid rate increased the mobility of the U.S. 7th Fleet as it operated in the Far East.

Kawishiwi sailed once again 18 November, after a 5-month interval of Hawaiian exercises, for duty with the service force in the Far East. Carrier task groups were then operating off Taiwan, as the Chinese Nationalist held islands Quemoy-Matsu appeared in danger. The 7th Fleet served notice of America's intention to resist aggression blunting another Communist probe to test the Free World's determination. The oiler returned Pearl Harbor 23 March 1959 and resumed Hawaiian operations.

Her next Westpac cruise in August was also in the midst of Communist pressure, this time at Laos. However, the show of strength by the United States averted a crisis, and, after completing refueling duties, the oiler arrived Pearl Harbor 23 November. She sailed again 3 May 1960 on her sixth Westpac deployment, replenishing ships of the Taiwan patrol before returning to Hawaii 22 August.

Following replenishment operations in Hawaiian waters,Kawishiwi departed 6 February 1961 for 7th Fleet services. In addition to standing watch over the tense situation in Laos, the Fleet engaged in SEATO exercises in April. The oiler returned home 26 June for a 4-month respite before another Far East tour commencing 23 October. She fueled units of the 7th Fleet as the need for peacekeeping missions by the Navy intensified. Kawishiwi returned to Pearl Harbor 27 February 1962 for overhaul.

From 17 September 1962 to 5 February 1963, she engaged in another Far East deployment with the 7th Fleet. During October she replenished many ships participating in amphibious exercises off Okinawa. Kawishiwi returned home 5 February and operated in Hawaiian waters throughout the year engaging in exercises and replenishment duties. As military operations in Vietnam grew in intensity, her duty in the Orient concentrated more and more on refueling the Navy's ships which were fighting Communist aggression in Southeast Asia. After devoting most of the first half of 1966 to servicing ships off Vietnam, she returned to Pearl Harbor 15 July. Operations in the mid-Pacific ensued until she headed back to the Western Pacific 27 March 1967. Kawishiwi arrived Subic Bay 12 April and fueled the ships of the 7th Fleet through mid-1967.

During the years 1969-1975, Kawishiwi remained in Far East waters supporting military operations off the coast of North and South Vietnam delivering millions of gallons of fuel oil, jet fuel, aviation gasoline 37,800,000 US gallons (143,000 m 3 ) of fuel oil, 19 million US gallons (72,000 m 3 ) of jet fuel and over 200,000 US gallons (760 m 3 ) of aviation gasoline to 271 ships. In addition to her normal petroleum products, Kawishiwi delivered over 290,000 pounds of fleet freight and mail, plus 234 passengers for ships in Vietnamese waters.

During 1970-1971, Kawishiwi once again found herself away from her home port of Pearl Harbor and instead off the coast of Vietnam supporting military operations. During this latest cruise, her sixteenth, under the command of Captain Donald M. Wyand, the Kawishiwi delivered 44 million US gallons (170,000 m 3 ) of fuel to 196 ships. In addition to her normal petroleum products, the Kawishiwi delivered over 250,000 pounds of fleet freight and mail, plus 200 passengers for ships in Vietnamese waters.

Kawishiwi was decommissioned on 10 October 1979, and placed in service with Military Sealift Command as USNSKawishiwi (T-AO-146), continuing her service with a civilian crew. She was placed out of service in 1992, and struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 7 November 1994.


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Kawishiwi (AO 146). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 156 crew members registered for the USS Kawishiwi (AO 146).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1967 | 1968 &ndash 1972 | 1973 &ndash 1977 | 1978 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Tucker, BruceSA/E2Aug 1978 &ndash Oct 1979S2
Painter, Mark Battmane-3-supplySep 1, 1978 &ndash Sep 1, 1979supplyhey there ship mates this is the batman if any friends want to get in touch my e-mail is [email protected] my phone#1-423-579-0002.its been along journey from our time in the service.
Dunn, SeanSNOct 1978 &ndash Oct 1979 Deck department, 2nd Div. I was the one who spotted the liferafts on the horizon flashing their lights at us while on starboard lookout around midnight. we rescued about 16 people in two life rafts whose small ship had sank. Westpac 78/79
McKinstry, JohnVariedOct 1978 &ndash Oct 1979Supply
Stearns, DougGMGNov 1978 &ndash 1980gunners mate
Klamer, RichardMM2Dec 1978 &ndash Oct 1979MDecommissioning crew. Finished at Alameda.
Lara, RickQMSNJan 1979 &ndash Jan 1980NavigationWas on board from 1979 till 1980. My first ship out of 4 in my naval career.
Dudley, HectorOS 2Mar 1979 &ndash Mar 1980Opslots of great memories. Made one westpac and we spent some time in Guam, Japan, and Subic Bay. Love to hear from some old friends.
Shepherd, LemLt.Jun 1, 1982 &ndash Jul 1, 1983Mil Det.First OIC after transfer to MSC. Relieved OSC Buchanon and served with OSC Wilson after the conversion from USS to USNS in Oakland, CA.
Olson, Bob - (Oly)ET2Jun 15, 1983 &ndash Jun 15, 1986OPSSan Diego - What a great time!! Met a lot of Great people. Would love to hear from anyone.
Torres, RubenRM31985 &ndash 1987OpsServed under MSC days. My best buddy was Rhoul Roseman. Had some great times. Was stationed in San Diego during those days.
Carrier, Ron "Bug"ETCJun 1985 &ndash Jun 1986MILDETBest memory was making CPO in Vancouver. Enjoyed the trips to Tijuana and softball against the CIVMARS.
Clark, Jeffrey "Jt"RM2Jun 1985 &ndash Jun 1986OPS / MILDETTrying to get in contact with the Chief Cook and Chief Engine, I need to get some payback from all the card games I lost. Best times ever were spent on the Special K.
Sutton, TyRM2Aug 1985 &ndash Jun 1987Ops
Rankin, MikeSM3Mar 1987 &ndash 1989OPSSome of the best times of my life on this tanker
Brewster, JanetRM2Jun 1987 &ndash Jun 1989OPSMissing my haze grey underway days.
Schiffert, Tamara (Tammy) SM31988 &ndash 1991OPSThis was my first ship, and met some really good friends.
Kimbrell, GarySM1(SW)Feb 1988 &ndash Nov 1990MILDETPlenty of sea time onboard this ship. Do any of you remember the Special "K" sign on the port & stbd sides of the Signal Shack? Eric Holtz was the "ET" of the "ET" shop. Retired in 1997.
Holzer, EricET3/ET2Aug 1988 &ndash Jan 1990
Smith, SteveRM21989 &ndash 1990OpsRadioman assigned to ops. Homeported in San Diego MSC in Oakland.
Bohling, Edward2ND ELECTRICIANNov 1989 &ndash Jun 1990 CIVMAR CREW MEMBER
Padin, Virginia (Gina)RM31990 &ndash 1992 I served on the USNS Kawishiwi and am looking for any old friends. Email me @ [email protected]
Heflin, StephenSMSNJun 6, 1990 &ndash May 24, 1991OPSHad a great time.
Labranche, GlennET2(SW)Oct 1991 &ndash Aug 1992ET ShopWas on Decommissioning Crew in 1992

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1967 | 1968 &ndash 1972 | 1973 &ndash 1977 | 1978 &ndash now


Comments

I don’t know if you remember me or not but i served under you on the Kawishiwi. I have recently reconnected with some of my old shipmates and even visited a few while on the mainland (i still live in Hawaii where i earned a BA in journalism and have worked as a broadcast journalist and freelance writer). I would love to hear from you. I hope you are well.

Dear sir I served under your command 1973 1976. We served off the Vietnam Coast. I remember the time we got a little too close to the Hancock. I was a machinist mate. The time that I served will never be forgotten. God bless you,God bless by Shipmates and God bless America.

Hey John – I served on the Kawishiwi and was on the outrigger team in 73-74, starting out in “A” division on the deck, and then moving into Sick Bay as a striker. Did 22 years in the Navy and another 20 as a contractor, and am now an author and business guy in PA and Florida.

Had mentioned CAPT John in one of my books for his leadership skills, and am adding him again (short blurb) in my next book, and did a quick search, where I came across this fantastic page of yours. THANKS. Though I don’t have any reason at this point to add pics in my book, would I be allowed to use any of these if the op came up? Maybe share a little of your story?

I served on the Kawishii from 74 to 77 did few westpacs and went through shellback initation I am looking for john Campbell and anyone who served during this timeframe

WAS KAWISHIWI AO-146 WITHIN 12 MILES OF VIETNAM ?

Not on this deployment, Gary.

To Captain John L. Nicholson,
It was a proud and memorable time while serving with you on Kawishiwi ( 1971-1975 period). “Pressing on” was the order of the day and we did our best to fulfill our obligations. Your leadership was inspirational and very proud to serve with your distinction. Thank you.
Dave Kanitz HTC(sw) ret.

Hello Captain! One of my favorite memories of you aboard the Kawishiwi was this… A couple of us sailors heard that if you knocked the valve off a five foot tall oxygen bottle, it would fly like a rocket. So… we went into the ships woodshop, made three fins and a rudimentary nosecone and attached them to a full oxygen bottle. We then propped the bottle up at the port side rail. As we were preparing to use a sledge hammer to knock off the valve, you happened to see us. After we explained what we were up to, you put an immediate end to our experiment and ‘accused’ us of “trying to sink your ship”! We dismantled our rocket and the matter ended there! It was an honor to serve under you! Tom Miller Commissaryman and a Corpsman Kawishiwi Jan 72 – Aug 75


USS Kawishiwi AO 146 - Framed Navy Ship Display

This is a beautiful ship display commemorating the USS Kawishiwi (AO-146) and all those who served aboard. The artwork depicts the USS Kawishiwi in all her glory. The display features not a photograph, but an artist's creation of the ship as well as an engraved custom US Navy plaque and an engraved ship's statistics plaque. This product is richly finished with custom cut and sized double mats and framed with a high quality black frame. Only the best materials are used to complete our ship displays. Navy Emporium's Ship Displays make a generous and personal gift for any Navy sailor.

We offer FREE PERSONALIZATION on our Framed Navy Ship Display products.

Add up to three lines of personalized text to your Framed Navy Ship Display along with your mat color selection. We will add your text to the ship artwork. We will select the proper font size and position that will fit best with the artwork.

It's that simple. And at no additional cost!
See an example of our free personalized text here.

  • Custom designed and expertly engraved Navy crest positioned on fine black felt
  • Artwork is 16" X 7" on heavyweight matte, printed with archival ink that is rated at greater than 150 years without fading
  • Engraved plaque stating the ship's vital statistics
  • Enclosed in a high quality 20" X 16" black frame
  • Choice of matting color options

SHIPPING: We typically ship orders out within five (5) full business days!

PLEASE VIEW OUR OTHER GREAT USS KAWISHIWI AO-146 INFORMATION:
USS Kawishiwi AO-146 Crew Guestbook


USNS คาวิชิวิ (T-AO-146)

Kawishiwi (AO-146) เปิดตัวเมื่อวันที่ 11 ธันวาคม 1954 โดย New York Shipbuilding Corporation , Camden, NJ สนับสนุนโดยนาง Edmund T. Wooldridge และรับหน้าที่ 6 กรกฎาคม พ.ศ. 2498 กัปตันโจเซฟ บี. สเวนเป็นผู้บังคับบัญชา Kawishiwi เคลียร์ฟิลาเดลเฟีย 18 พฤศจิกายน 1955 และมาถึงบ้านที่ท่าเรือลองบีช 8 ธันวาคมเพื่อฝึกฝนการ สลัด ทิ้ง เมื่อเสร็จสิ้นการฝึก เธอออกจากลองบีช 25 เมษายน 2499 เพื่อเติมเต็มเรือเดินสมุทรที่ 7 เธอยังคงอยู่ในตะวันออกไกลในการเติมเชื้อเพลิงจนกว่าจะกลับมาที่ลองบีช 10 ตุลาคม

  • ยาว 11,600 ตัน (11,786 ตัน) เบา
  • 38,000 ตันยาว (38,610 ตัน) เต็ม
  • กังหัน 2 เกียร์
  • หม้อต้ม 2 ตัว
  • 2 เพลา
  • 28,000 แรงม้า (20.9 เมกะวัตต์)
  • ยูเอส : 324
  • USNS : 106 พลเรือนกะลาสี, 21 กองทัพเรือ
  • ปืนสองวัตถุประสงค์ขนาด 5"/38 ลำกล้อง เดี่ยวขนาด 2 × 2 ×
  • 6 × ปืนคู่ 3"/50 ลำกล้องคู่

กองทัพเรือสหรัฐฯ พ.ศ. 2499-2522

ระหว่างปีพ.ศ. 2500 บริษัทน้ำมันได้แบ่งปีเป็นงานเติมน้ำมันในตะวันออกไกลและดำเนินการออกจากลองบีช คาวิชิวี มาถึง เพิร์ลฮาร์เบอร์ ซึ่งเป็น ท่าเรือ บ้านของเธอ เมื่อวันที่ 21 มกราคม พ.ศ. 2501 และ 1 เดือนต่อมาก็แล่นเรือเพื่อติดตั้ง Westpac ครั้งที่ 3 ของเธอ ความสามารถของเธอในการเติมเชื้อเพลิงให้กับเรือในอัตราที่รวดเร็วช่วยเพิ่มความคล่องตัวของ กองเรือที่เจ็ดของสหรัฐอเมริกา ในขณะที่ดำเนินการในตะวันออกไกล

Kawishiwi แล่นเรืออีกครั้งในวันที่ 18 พฤศจิกายน หลังจากการฝึกซ้อมของชาวฮาวายเป็นเวลา 5 เดือน เพื่อปฏิบัติหน้าที่กับ Service Force, Pacific Fleet ในตะวันออกไกล จากนั้นกลุ่มงานของผู้ให้บริการขนส่งได้ปฏิบัติการนอกไต้หวัน เนื่องจากผู้รักชาติจีนยึดเกาะ Quemoy-Matsu ตกอยู่ในอันตราย ผู้ส่งน้ำมันส่งคืนเพิร์ลฮาร์เบอร์ 23 มีนาคม 2502 และเริ่มปฏิบัติการในฮาวายต่อ

การล่องเรือ Westpac ครั้งต่อไปของเธอในเดือนสิงหาคมก็อยู่ท่ามกลางแรงกดดันของคอมมิวนิสต์ คราวนี้ที่ลาว อย่างไรก็ตาม การแสดงความแข็งแกร่งของสหรัฐฯ ได้ช่วยพลิกวิกฤต และหลังจากทำหน้าที่เติมน้ำมันเสร็จแล้ว ผู้ส่งน้ำมันก็มาถึงเพิร์ลฮาร์เบอร์ในวันที่ 23 พฤศจิกายน เธอแล่นเรืออีกครั้งในวันที่ 3 พฤษภาคม 1960 ในการติดตั้ง Westpac ครั้งที่หกของเธอ เติมเรือลาดตระเวนของไต้หวันก่อนจะกลับไปฮาวาย 22 สิงหาคม

หลังจากดำเนินการเติมสินค้าในน่านน้ำฮาวาย คา วิชีวีได้ ออกเดินทางเมื่อวันที่ 6 กุมภาพันธ์ พ.ศ. 2504 เพื่อให้บริการกองเรือที่ 7 นอกเหนือจากการยืนดูสถานการณ์ตึงเครียดในลาวแล้ว กองเรือรบยังได้ร่วมซ้อมรบ SEATO ในเดือนเมษายน คนขายน้ำมันกลับบ้านในวันที่ 26 มิถุนายนเพื่อพักผ่อน 4 เดือนก่อนทัวร์ฟาร์อีสท์อีกครั้งซึ่งจะเริ่มในวันที่ 23 ตุลาคม เธอเติมเชื้อเพลิงให้กับหน่วยของกองเรือที่ 7 เนื่องจากความจำเป็นในภารกิจรักษาสันติภาพโดยกองทัพเรือทวีความรุนแรงมากขึ้น Kawishiwi กลับไปที่ Pearl Harbor 27 กุมภาพันธ์ 1962 เพื่อทำการยกเครื่องใหม่

ตั้งแต่วันที่ 17 กันยายน พ.ศ. 2505 ถึง 5 กุมภาพันธ์ พ.ศ. 2506 เธอได้เข้าร่วมกับกองเรือที่ 7 ของฟาร์อีสท์อีกครั้ง ในช่วงเดือนตุลาคม เธอเติมเรือหลายลำที่เข้าร่วมการฝึกสะเทินน้ำสะเทินบกนอกโอกินาว่า Kawishiwi กลับบ้านเมื่อวันที่ 5 กุมภาพันธ์และดำเนินการในน่านน้ำฮาวายตลอดทั้งปีโดยมีส่วนร่วมในการออกกำลังกายและหน้าที่การเติมเต็ม ขณะที่ปฏิบัติการทางทหารในเวียดนามรุนแรงขึ้นเรื่อยๆ หน้าที่ของเธอในภาคตะวันออกได้เน้นย้ำมากขึ้นเรื่อยๆ ในการเติมเชื้อเพลิงให้กับเรือของกองทัพเรือที่กำลังต่อสู้กับการรุกรานของคอมมิวนิสต์ในเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ หลังจากอุทิศส่วนใหญ่ของครึ่งแรกของปี 1966 เพื่อให้บริการเรือนอกเวียดนาม เธอกลับไปยังเพิร์ลฮาร์เบอร์ 15 กรกฎาคม ปฏิบัติการในกลางแปซิฟิกเกิดขึ้นจนกระทั่งเธอเดินทางกลับไปยังแปซิฟิกตะวันตก 27 มีนาคม พ.ศ. 2510 คาวิชีวี มาถึงอ่าวซูบิกเมื่อวันที่ 12 เมษายน และเติมเชื้อเพลิงให้กับเรือของกองเรือที่ 7 จนถึงกลางปี ​​พ.ศ. 2510

ในช่วงปี พ.ศ. 2512-2518 Kawishiwi ยังคงอยู่ในน่านน้ำตะวันออกไกลซึ่งสนับสนุนการปฏิบัติการทางทหารนอกชายฝั่งเวียดนามเหนือและเวียดนามใต้ โดยส่งมอบน้ำมันเชื้อเพลิงหลายล้านแกลลอน น้ำมันเชื้อเพลิงเครื่องบิน น้ำมันสำหรับเครื่องบิน 37,800,000 แกลลอนสหรัฐฯ (143,000 ม. 3 ) ของน้ำมันเชื้อเพลิง 19 ล้านแกลลอนสหรัฐ (72,000 ม. 3 ) ของน้ำมันเครื่องบินและมากกว่า 200,000 แกลลอนสหรัฐ (760 ม. 3 ) ของน้ำมันเบนซินสำหรับการบินไปยัง 271 ลำ นอกจากผลิตภัณฑ์ปิโตรเลียมทั่วไปแล้ว Kawishiwi ยัง ส่งมอบสินค้าและไปรษณีย์จำนวนกว่า 290,000 ปอนด์ รวมถึงผู้โดยสาร 234 คนสำหรับเรือในน่านน้ำเวียดนาม

ในช่วงปี 2513-2514 Kawishiwi พบว่าตัวเองอยู่ห่างจากท่าเรือ เพิร์ลฮาร์เบอร์ บ้านเกิดของเธออีกครั้ง และอยู่นอกชายฝั่งเวียดนามที่สนับสนุนการปฏิบัติการทางทหาร ระหว่างการล่องเรือครั้งล่าสุดนี้ ครั้งที่สิบหกของเธอ ภายใต้คำสั่งของกัปตันโดนัลด์ เอ็ม. วายด์ เรือคาวิ ชีวี ส่ง เชื้อเพลิง 44 ล้านแกลลอนสหรัฐ (170,000 ม. 3 ) ให้กับเรือ 196 ลำ นอกจากผลิตภัณฑ์ปิโตรเลียมทั่วไปแล้ว เรือ คาวิชีวียัง ขนส่งสินค้ากองเรือและไปรษณีย์กว่า 250,000 ปอนด์ พร้อมผู้โดยสาร 200 คนสำหรับเรือในน่านน้ำเวียดนาม

กองบัญชาการ Sealift ค.ศ. 1978–1992

คาวิชีวี ถูกปลดประจำการเมื่อวันที่ 10 ตุลาคม พ.ศ. 2522 และเข้าประจำการกับ กองบัญชาการ Sealift Command ในฐานะ USNS Kawishiwi (T-AO-146) และยังคงให้บริการกับลูกเรือพลเรือนต่อไป นอกจากนี้ กองทหาร (MilDet) ของลูกเรือประมาณ 20 คนอยู่บนเรือเพื่อจัดการการสื่อสารและการซ่อมแซมอุปกรณ์อิเล็กทรอนิกส์ เธอถูกปลดออกจากราชการในปี 1992 และถูกโจมตีจาก ทะเบียนเรือเดินสมุทร เมื่อวันที่ 7 พฤศจิกายน 1994

Kawishiwi ถูกย้ายไปที่ สหรัฐอเมริกาการเดินเรือการบริหาร (MARAD) วันที่ 1 พฤษภาคม 1999 วางขึ้นมาใน กลาโหมแห่งชาติสำรองเรือเดินสมุทร , ซุยซันเบย์สำรองอย่างรวดเร็ว ในรัฐแคลิฟอร์เนีย เมื่อวันที่ 27 ตุลาคม 2010 คณะกรรมการ California Ships to Reefs Inc. ได้อนุมัติแผนการที่จะ "แนวปะการัง" Kawishiwi ในน้ำ 130 ฟุต (40 เมตร) ประมาณ 4 ไมล์ (6.4 กม.) นอกชายฝั่งหาด Capistrano ทางตอนใต้ของรัฐแคลิฟอร์เนีย ต่อมาถูกทิ้งเพราะเรือลำนี้ถือว่าไม่เหมาะสม [2] เรือถูกขายทิ้งเมื่อต้นปี 2557 [1]


Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) maintains the National Defense Reserve Fleet, a fleet of vessels that serves as a reserve of ships for national defense and national emergency purposes. The reserve fleet program was begun in 1946 at the end of World War II. At its peak in 1950, the program had more than 2,000 ships in lay-up. One of the reserve fleet storage sites is in Suisun Bay, the northern portion of San Francisco Bay. Only a small portion of vessels currently remain with the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet. In January 2016, the Department of Transportation and MARAD have officially announced the fleet closure in February 2017. All remaining ships will be sold at auction or scrapped.

The State of California and several environmental groups have raised concerns about the environmental impacts of the fleet. Potential concerns include heavy metals and anti-fouling agents in the paint that is peeling off of the vessels, as well as PCBs and other hazardous materials that may have been released. Congress responded to these concerns by funding the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to design and implement a study of contaminants in the vicinity of the fleet.

NOAA's Damage Assessment, Response and Restoration Program (DARRP) began work on this project in January 2008. Since then, NOAA's team has assessed existing data from the area to determine data gaps, researched the history and environmental setting of the site, discussed the project with numerous stakeholders, conducted a site visit, and developed and refined a sampling and analysis plan. NOAA deployed bivalve samples in June 2008 and collected sediment and bivalve tissue samples from the area in July 2008. A second field sampling event for additional tissue samples occurred in September. These samples were analyzed and a data report was delivered in early 2009.


File:Aerial view of USS Iowa (BB-61) and other ships laid-up in Suisun Bay, California (USA), circa in the early 2000s.jpg

USS Wahkiakum County (LST-1162) (bow only visible), removed 24 August 2005 and scrapped,
USNS Mispillion (T-AO-105), scrapped 2012
USNS Hassayampa (T-AO-145), scrapped 2014
USNS Kawishiwi (T-AO-146), scrapped 2014
USS Pyro (AE-24), scrapped 2012
USNS Ponchatoula (T-AO-148), scrapped 2014
USS Nereus (AS-17), scrapped 2012
USS Wichita (AOR-1), scrapped 2013
USS Kansas City (AOR-3), scrapped 2014
USS Roanoke (AOR-7), scrapped 2013
USS Wabash (AOR-5), scrapped 2013
USS Cimarron (AO-177), scrapped 2012
USS Proteus (IX-518/AS-19), scrapped 2007

USS Iowa (BB-61), museum ship in Los Angeles, California (USA), since 2011.


Watch the video: USS Kawishiwi AO-146 - 1956