3rd Bombardment Group

3rd Bombardment Group

3rd Bombardment Group

History - Books - Aircraft - Time Line - Commanders - Main Bases - Component Units - Assigned To

History

The 3rd Bombardment Group was a light bomber group that took part in the long campaign in New Guinea and the reconquest of the Philippines, before flying a few missions over Japan before the end of the war.

The group was originally formed as a reconnaissance group in 1919, and spent three years patrolling the Mexican border. It became an attack group in 1921 and a bombardment group in 1939. In 1939-41 the group was used as a training organisation, providing trained crews to form other groups during the expansion of the Air Corps.

After the Japanese entry into the war the group was sent to Australia, arriving in February 1942. The newly arrived group was fully equipped but inexperienced. In contrast the 27th Bombardment Group had been caught in the fighting on the Philippines (as infantry) and on Java (as airmen). The surviving aircrews from the fighting on Java were assigned to the 3rd Bombardment Group, giving it a core of experienced men.

The group began operations with its B-25s in early April 1942. It was based in Australia, but used Port Moresby as a staging post. Its early operations were against targets on New Guinea, where the group helped to stop the Japanese advance towards Port Moresby and then took part in the Allied counterattacks. The group also was also used for reconnaissance missions, flying more than 120 recon sorties in May 1942 (partly looking for the Japanese fleet in the Coral Sea).

By July 1942 the group had a mix of aircraft, with twenty two A-24s, thirty-eight A-20s and seventeen B-25s. The number of B-25s slowly rose and by the end of the summer two squadrons were operating the type. The group operated as far away as Rabaul, but most sorties were nearer to their bases.

At the start of 1943 the group officially moved to New Guinea, and it took part in the Allied advance along the north coast of the island, fighting at Salamaua, Lae, Hollandia, Wakde, Biak and Noemfoor. The plan was to re-equip the entire group with the A-20 by the end of 1943, but deliveries were delayed and so the group kept some B-25s for longer than expected.

In March 1943 the group took part in the Battle of the Bismarck Sea. In August it took part in a series of attacks on Wewak, and the group won a Distinguished Unit Citation for its part in an attack on 17 August.

From September 1943 the group was part of the First Air Task Force, which had operational control of the attacks on Rabaul. On 12 October 1943 the group took part in an attack on Rabaul that was the largest air attack in the Pacific to that date. The 3rd used three squadrons to attack Rapopo airfield, attacking with its .50in machine guns and 20lb parafrag bombs. The group claimed to had destroyed 15-25 aircraft on the ground and three in the air, but admitted that the results were uncertain due to dust and smoke. The group returned to Rapapo again on 24 October.

On 2 November the group took part in an attack on Simpson Harbor, New Britain. This time shipping was the target and the Japanese later admitted to the loss of 18,000 tons in an oil tanker and three merchant vessels as well as a minesweeper and two other bats. This was lower than the original US claims, but higher than their final figures. The attack cost the group the commander of the 8th Squadron, Raymond H Wilkins, whose aircraft was shot down as he attempted to draw fire from a Japanese destroyer. Wilkins was awarded a posthumous Medal of Honor.

The group supported the landings at Cape Gloucester in December 1943, including an attack on Japanese machine gun positions on 28 December (carried out by A-20s).

On 15 February four squadrons of A-20s attacked shipping and a floatplane base on Kavieng in an attempt to distract the Japanese from the invasion of Nissan Island. Four days later the group attacked a Japanese convoy of ships that were attempting to escape from the danger area.

March 1944 saw the group's attention switch to the Japanese base at Wewak, part on an attempt to neutralize Hollandia. On 3 April the group took part in the largest Fifth Air Force raid to date, using its A-20s for low level strafing and 100lb parademolition bombs during an attack on Hollandia. Attacks on shipping also continued, and the group sank the 1,915 ton Narita Maru in Humboldt Bay on 12 April.

The group supported the invasions of Wakde and Biak in May 1944. The 8th Squadron was allocated to Wakde, with the rest of the group used at Biak. The group was under the control of the 310th Bombardment Wing during this operation.

During the landing on Biak the group's A-20s orbited off the island, responding to calls for help. One A-20 was lost to Japanese flak, the only Allied aircraft lost over the island on the day of the invasion.

In June 1944 the group attacks Japanese airfields at Babo and Geelvink Bay. It was also used for attacks on Japanese barges at Manokwari, claiming 74 of the 107 ships sunk. The group also took part in attacks on Moemfoor, making June 1944 the group's busiest operational month.

On 14 July the group sent 74 aircraft on a successful attack on the Japanese oil facilities at Boela.

In November 1944 the ground echelon largely moved to Leyte The aircraft rather lagged behind, and the two parts of the groups didn't really come together until they met on Mindoro in December. From Mindoro they were used to support ground operations on Luzon, and early in 1945 they supported landings close to Manila. On 7 February 1945 they attacked the Japanese bases at Puerto Princesa on Palawan, in the west of the Philippines.

On 5 April 1945 the group's commander, Richard E. Ellis, took part in an experimental long range raid. He has extra fuel tanks installed in the wings of three A-20s, and accompanied a raid by the B-25s of the 308th Bombardment Wing. The B-25s missed their target, but Ellis and his three aircraft found one cargo ship and two escorts. The 2,193 ton merchant ship was sunk in shallow water while one destroyer escort was left dead in the water and the other badly damaged.

On 25 April the group took part in a campaign against the sugar industry on Formosa. The Japanese hoped to use the sugar to produce alcohol which could be used as aviation fuel. The 3rd destroyed a sugar refinery at Taito.

In June 1945 the group began to convert to the A-26, although this change wasn't completed before the end of the war. The group did move to Okinawa in August 1945 and flew a few missions over Japan before the end of the war.

After the end of the fighting the Group moved to Japan, where it formed part of the Far East Air Forces, the occupation forces on Japan.

Books

To Follow

Aircraft

Douglas A-20 Boston/ Havoc: 1941-45
Douglas A-24 Banshee (SBD Dauntless ) ; 1941, 1942
Douglas A-26 Invader : 1945-1956
North American B-25 Mitchell: 1942-1944

Timeline

1 July 1919Organized as Army Surveillance Group
August 1919Redesignated as 1st Surveillance Group
1921Redesignated as 3rd Attack Group
1939Redesignated as 3rd Bombardment Group (Light)
1942To Australia and Fifth Air Force
1 April 1942Combat Debut
September 1942Redesignated as 3rd Bombardment Group (Dive)
May 1943Redesignated as 3rd Bombardment Group (Light)

Commanders (with date of appointment)

Col JohnC McDonnell: Sep 1938
Lt Col R G Breen:Nov 1940
Lt Col Paul L Williams: Dec1940
Lt Col Phillips Melville: 18 Aug 1941
1st Lt Robert F Strickland: 19 Jan1942
Col John H Davies: 2 Apr 1942
LtCol Robert F Strickland: 26 Oct 1942
MajDonald P Hall: 28 Apr 1943
Lt ColJames A Downs: 20 Oct 1943
Col John PHenebry: 7 Nov 1943
Lt Col Richard HEllis: 27 Jun 1944
Col John P Henebry:30 Oct 1944
Col Richard H Ellis: 28 Dec1944
Col Charles W Howe: 1 May 1945
Lt Col James E Sweeney: 7 Dec 1945

Main Bases

Barksdale Field, La: 28 Feb 1935
Savannah, Ga: 6 Oct 1940-19 Jan 1942
Brisbane, Australia: 25 Feb 1942
ChartersTowers, Australia: 10 Mar 1942
PortMoresby, New Guinea: 28 Jan 1943
Dobodura, New Guinea: 20 May 1943
Nadzab, New Guinea: 3 Feb 1944
Hollandia,New Guinea: 12 May 1944
Dulag,Leyte: 16 Nov 1944
San Jose, Mindoro:c. 30 Dec 1944
Okinawa: 6 Aug 1945
Atsugi, Japan: c. 8 Sep 1945

Component Units

8th Bombardment Squadron: 1919 onwards
13th: 1919-24: 1929 onwards
89th: 1941-46
90th: 1919-

Assigned To

1932-1940: 3rd Bombardment Wing
1940-1941: 17th Bombardment Wing
1942-1946: V Bomber Command; Fifth Air Force
Summer 1944: 310th Bombardment Wing; V Bomber Command; Fifth Air Force


3rd Bombardment Group - History

The 3rd Bombardment Wing (the 3rd Fighter Wing activated in 1964 and the 3rd Bombardment Group deactivated in 1965) and its component squadrons are among the oldest in the United States Air Force having seen action in the Mexican War, World War I, World War II, the Korean Conflict, and Vietnam. If one looks at its heraldry in the 3rd Wing Emblem above, there is a blue stripe, cactus and Maltese crosses. These represent the earliest missions performed by the wing's predecessors. The blue stripe represents the Rio Grande River. The cactus represents the desert over which the squadrons patrolled. The Maltese crosses represent the enemy aircraft brought down by the squadrons in World War I. ("Per bend Vert and Sable a bend Azure fimbriated Or in sinister chief a prickly pear cactus of the like, all within a bordure Argent semi of nineteen crosses patee Black and fimbriated Yellow.")

Motto: NON SOLUM ARMIS -- Not by Arms Alone. Approved for 3d Group on 17 Jan 1922 and for 3d Wing on 22 Dec 1952 (KE 6707).

Nickname: "Grim Reapers". Adopted from the 13th Bombardment

Squadron -- "The Devil's Own Grim Reapers". Adopted in World War II and used in news articles in the Korean War. Lou Segaloff of Tucson, Arizona wrote, "Actually, from the mid 1930' until the end of WWII, the whole 3rd Group called themselves "The Grim Reapers" and used a modified version of the 13th emblem on the noses of the planes."

The 3rd Wing has a long and distinguished career. From the 3rd Wing History (1999), ". it remains the only wing level organization which can claim to have served every moment. Indeed, the 3rd Wing, in one form or another, has served the United States on a continuing basis since its activation as the U.S. Army Surveillance Group on 1 July 1919--almost 78 years. Including squadrons active in World War I (the 19th and 90th Fighter Squadrons) the wing and its organizations have participated in virtually every major U. S. conflict of the 20th century. The U. S. Army Air Service emerged from World War I with three distinct missions, pursuit, bomber, and attack/observation. These organizations became today's 1st Fighter Wing, 2nd Bomb Wing, and 3rd Wing." (NOTE: There is some confusion about whether the wing was deactivated in 1964 or not. Some claim it was deactivated after 46 years of continuous service -- and reborn in 1970 as the 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing with all honors intact. However, the truth is that the 3rd Bomb Group was deactivated and all its honors bestowed on the 3rd Bomb Wing. The 3rd Bomb Wing was never deactivated. Though the Wing has not been in existence as long as the Group, it can claim lineage.)

The 17th Bomb Wing After the War

The title of this should probably be The 17th After the Cessation of Hostilities because the action in Korea was not declared a war until the passage of the Defense Act of 1999 and there has never been a peace treaty- only an armistice.

With the cessation of hostilities the mission became:

For the Wing:

Administer, operate, and maintain K-9 AFB (Pusan East)

Cooperate with the CO of the 366 Aviation Btn in maintaining K-1 AFB (Pusan West)

Operate REMCO in support of B-26 and RB-26 Aircraft for the 3rd and 17th Bomb Wings and the 67th Tactical Recon Wing

Prepare and maintain plans to conduct operations and maintain combat effectiveness

Train and maintain thorough proficiency in navigation and bombing using visual and SHORAN methods

Perform Special Missions and assume responsibilities as directed by CG 5th AF

For the Group:

Maintain combat readiness for:

Interdiction of enemy lines of communication by visual and radar

Destruction of enemy installations, equipment, supplies and air and ground forces by visual and radar means

Conduct maximum range low and medium level armed reconnaissance offensive strikes

Conduct Special Missions

Operations

The first order of business was to complete the training of the new combat crews, whose training had been delayed by the July maximum effort missions and the adverse weather conditions. This was accomplished so that there were 87 combat ready air crews, and the aircraft readiness rate stood at 85% by the end of December 1953. Upon completion of this training there was an overage of combat crews. Both the 37th Bomb Squadron and the 95th Bomb Squadron completed successful deployments to K-55.

The decline began in January. In this period, rotation of personnel and material shortages took their toll. All combat crews who had flown any combat missions were deployed to the ZI before Christmas. By the end of June, aircrews qualified during the last half of the 1953 were completing their tours and returning to the ZI. The number of Wing aircrews available fell from 89 in January to 60 in June. The 34th went from 29 crews in January to 9 in June - representative of what happened to all squadrons during this period. The transfer of A/C reduced the number of available aircraft from 54 in January to 33 by the end of June. For example the 34th Squadron lost 12 aircraft and received 5 in return. All SHORAN capable aircraft were transferred to the 3rd Bomb Wing and a significant number of aircraft were transferred to the French for use in Indo-China. The aircraft received from the 3rd Bomb Wing in exchange for the SHORAN Aircraft, were in poor condition and required extensive maintenance before they could be declared combat ready. The loss of maintenance personnel and the unavailability of spare parts caused the aircraft readiness rate to fall from an 87% in January to 65% in June.

In June, the situation began to improve with the arrival of replacement crewmembers and the improved availability of spare parts. Unfortunately, the reporting aircrew members were far from being ready. The crews had not been through training at Langley . Of 17 reporting pilots, 14 had less than 50 hours in type. None of the Navigator-Bombardiers had ever dropped a bomb. With extensive training and hard work, the Wing was brought back up to a combat ready status. In November and December, the 95th and 37th Squadrons accomplished a successful deployment to K-8.

On 10 October, the Wing received orders to move to Miho AFB in Japan . This move was accomplished and operations commenced from Japan . These operations were not altogether satisfactory for the flying time from Japan to Korea reduced time over any training routes or ranges. REMCO was disestablished as each wing assumed responsibility for is own maintenance.

In January, the Wing received orders to prepare for movement to the ZI on 1 April. Initially the movement was to be made without aircraft, as the Wing was to be re outfitted with B-57's, the new jet light bomber. On 26 January, due to problems in the B-57 program, this decision was reversed and the Wing was directed to transfer with 39 aircraft to Hurlburt Auxiliary Field Florida . Training flights continued through January. In February, all flying except that concerned with cruise control missions was terminated. The aircraft were stripped of all armament (guns, turrets, sighting equipment and rocket racks) and fitted with 625 gallon auxiliary tanks. On 16 April the first section of 4 aircraft departed. The last section departed on 19 April. Either a B-29 or a C-124, as a lead ship, escorted each flight of four aircraft. The last aircraft landed in Hulburt on 29 April. Many of the personnel took leave so that the wing did not become operational again until June.

The major change in Group operations was from flying fully armed aircraft in a potentially active arena to flying stripped down aircraft in the ZI.

Preparations and training to transition into the "B-57 effectively terminated the 17th Bomb Wing as we knew it. On 1 October 1955 it was redesignated the 17th Bomb Wing (Tactical). It was inactivated on 25 June 1958.

Wing Commanders

Col. Clinton C. Wassem (In command at cessation of hostilities)

Col. Murdoch W Campbell c. Aug 1953

Col. Daniel F Tatum c. Sept 1953

Col. George D. Hughes 8 July 1954

Col. Walter H Williamson 4 August 1954

Col. George D. Hughes 4 Sept 1954

Col. Howard F. Bronson Jr. 10 Sept 1954

Col. Carroll H. Bolender 9 May 1956

Col. Reginald J. Clizbe 25 June 1956

Col. Kenneth C Dempster 31 March - 25 June 1958

Stations

K-9 AFB Pusan , Korea (Station at cessation of hostilities)

Miho AFB Japan 10 October 1954

Hurlburt Field , FL 29 April 1955

Unit Designation

On 1 October Wing was re-designated 17th Bomb Wing (Tactical)

Unit De-activation

The 17th Bomb Wing was deactivated 25 June 1958.

This terminated the operation of the 17th Bomb Group/Wing as a Medium/Light bomber organization.


Structure

VIII Bomber Command

Command
VIII Bomber Command was constituted and activated in 1942. It oversaw heavy bombardment operations until February 1944, when it was redesginated as the 8th Air Force.

322nd Bomb Group

Group
The 322nd Bombardment Squadron (Medium) was activated on 19-Jun-1942 at MacDill Field, Florida with B-26B Marauder aircraft. In late September 1942 the unit moved to Drane Field, Florida. The Ground echelon sailed for the UK aboard the Queen Elizabeth.

323rd Bomb Group

Group
The 323rd Bombardment Group operated with B-26 Marauders, American medium bombers. They were the first Eighth Air Force Group to fly a medium level bombing mission with this aircraft on 16 July 1943. After flying a total of 33 missions with the Eighth.

386th Bomb Group

Group
The 386th Bomb Group flew B-26 Marauders for the Eighth and Ninth Air Forces. Whilst with the Eighth, the Group developed the formation release procedure for the B-26 on missions that targeted aerodromes, marshalling yards and V-weapon sites along the.

387th Bomb Group

Group
The 387th Bomb Group flew just under thirty missions with the Eighth Air Force before being transferred to the Ninth Air Force in October 1943. The Group remained at Chipping Ongar, Essex after being reassigned and continued to hit targets in France.


Insignia, 3rd Bombardment Group, United States Army Air Corps

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Insignia, 3rd Bombardment Group, United States Army Air Corps

United States Army Air Corps 3rd Bombardment Group Distinctive Insignia center shield divided diagonally in green and black enamel with blue enamel diagonal band in center center shield has white enamel border with black Maltese crosses shield surmounted by white enamel wings black enamel text "NON SOLUM ARMIS" on upper scroll.

Usage Conditions Apply

There are restrictions for re-using this media. For more information, visit the Smithsonian's Terms of Use page.

IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and image viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. More - https://iiif.si.edu

Insignia, 3rd Bombardment Group, United States Army Air Corps

United States Army Air Corps 3rd Bombardment Group Distinctive Insignia center shield divided diagonally in green and black enamel with blue enamel diagonal band in center center shield has white enamel border with black Maltese crosses shield surmounted by white enamel wings black enamel text "NON SOLUM ARMIS" on upper scroll.

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Inventory Number

Physical Description

United States Army Air Corps 3rd Bombardment Group Distinctive Insignia center shield divided diagonally in green and black enamel with blue enamel diagonal band in center center shield has white enamel border with black Maltese crosses shield surmounted by white enamel wings black enamel text "NON SOLUM ARMIS" on upper scroll.


3rd Bombardment Group - History

Some Fifth Air Force A-20s had their heavy forward-firing armament supplemented by clusters of three Bazooka-type rocket tubes underneath each wing. These tubes each held an M8, T-30 4.5-inch spin-stabilized rocket. These rocket launcher tubes turned out to be heavy and complicated, and were generally more trouble than they were worth and were not often used.

The A-20 groups turned their attention to the Philippines following the end of the New Guinea campaign. By mid-April of 1944, three full four-squadron A-20 groups of the 5th Air Force were active in the island hopping campaign that led to the invasion of Luzon on January 7, 1945. After the Philippines were secured, A-20 units turned their attention to Japanese targets on Formosa in early 1945.

The 312th Bombardment Group had been originally scheduled to replace its A-20s with A-26 Invaders in early 1945, but General Kenney rejected the A-26, maintaining that it did not meet the needs of strafer units in the Southwest Pacific arena and a decision was made for the group to convert to the B-32 Dominator and become a Heavy Bombardment Group. Both the 386th and the 387th Squadron had completed the change by the end of the war, but the 387th and 389th Squadrons still had their A-20s. The 417th BG did transition to the A-26, however.

The old 3rd Bombardment Group still retained its A-20s until the end of the war, becoming the last operational Army A-20 unit. At the end of the war, it was in preparation to move to Okinawa in anticipation of the invasion of Japan.

Miss BeHaven" of the 388th Bomb Squadron/312th Bomb Group

312th Bomb Group
"Bevo" being flown by 1st Lt. James L. Knarr (KIA) with the gunner being S/Sgt. Charles G. Reichley (KIA).

Twelve A-20s took off from Hollandia Airfield on a mission led by Col. Strauss against Kokas,Dutch New Guinea.

This A-20 was part of the last flight of three aircraft over the target, led by Captain Jack W. Klein, with wingman 2nd Lt. Melvin H. Kapson and this aircraft. Approaching from the inland side of the the target, they dropped 250 lbs bombs and strafing gun positions. Hit by antiaircraft fire and crashed into the bay off Kokas, exploding when it hit the sea.

The other A-20s, involved in their own runs and evasive maneuvers were unaware of the fate of this A-20, until the photos of the mission were developed.

A series of four photos, taken by another A-20 ahead of it captured the plane's last moments in the air. These photos were later released to the media and appeared in Yank Magazine and TIME Magazine in support of the war bond drive captioned "Death of an A-20".


Serial 42-108530 assigned to the 312th Bomb Group. Nose art applied post-VJ Day. Its final stop on the way to the boneyard at Kingman: the factory where she was produced in Fort Worth, TX.


World War II Database

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Anonymous says:
2 Apr 2013 03:36:49 AM

The photograph of the B-25 Mitchell bomber of 3rd 'Grim Reapers' Bombardment Group shows it flying away from Simpson Harbour, Rabaul, East New Britain, PNG. I live there as a boy and the two rocks in the middle of the harbour, known locally as the "bee hives" are a dead give-away.

2. Kurtis Cook says:
16 Jun 2013 08:34:20 AM

That is my Great Grandpa's B-25, I have some more photos of him and his jacket where do I share them.

3. Randall T. Marks says:
25 Jan 2015 06:24:19 PM

This plane is the one my uncle Marshall T. Marks flew on his final mission when he and the other members of his crew were shot down by friendly fire at Cape Gloucester, New Britain. He was a radio/gunner on the plane which crashed inton Borgen Bay with all crew lost. The plane was a low level bomber in the photo above but was converted to a straffer and then flown in the 500th bomb squadron. Anyone with photos of the plane and it's second crew after refitting would be greatly appreciated.

4. flycol says:
4 Mar 2015 04:46:24 AM

Bloody Tuesday as it is known-Rabaul attack by USAAF B25s and Lightnings on 2nd Nov.43 is well described (and clinically so) by Bruce Gamble in "Target Rabaul".It is one of a trilogy of books centred mainly on the Japanese invasion of Rabaul and their ultimate defeat with emphasis on the air war.Written in 2013 it is a "must read" I feel(Aussie who flew in the area in late 60s early 70s -cvil airline) with out much of a clue until now.

5. George Kyser says:
28 Nov 2016 02:27:49 PM

My uncle, Lt. W. T. Kyser, was the pilot on this plane's final fatal mission. The craft inverted on taking fire they never had a chance. I have seen pictures (of the plane going down) in a book on the history of the 500th, but the plane is just a tiny speck can't tell much.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


3rd Bombardment Group - History

U.S. Military Personnel That Served in WWII

Last Name Beginning With (C)

For information on any of the names listed below, submit your request to [email protected]

For information about this Research Database, click here.

For information about the World War II History Center, click here.

Caddell, Kenneth E. USS Sterett 726

Cadish, Harold O. F Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 384 482

Cadwalader, Thomas 110th Field Artillery Battalion, 29th Infantry Division 403

Cafferata, Joseph T. USS Sterett 726

Caffey, Eugene 1st Engineer Special Brigade 384

Cagle, Johnnie 401st Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group 265

Cahill, James B Company, 192nd Tank Battalion 398

Cain, Joe Cannon Company, 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cain, Paul W. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Calahan, Rollie F. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Calandrella, Ray HQ Company, 3rd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division 844

Caldwell, Turner Pilot, US Navy 754

Cale, Sterling US Navy 517

Calfayon, Varton 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Calggett, Blade D. USS Dace 58

Calentano, Louis 526th Armored Infantry Battalion 557

Calhoun, Charles R. USS Sterett USS Lamberton 726

Calhoun, Edward T. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Call A Company, 741st Tank Battalion 375

Call, Bill B Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Callaghan, Daniel Judson Admiral, US Navy 565 584 726 754

Callahan, Charles W. US Army 426

Callahan, William F. 10th Mountain Division 785

Callanan, Jim USS Batfish 539

Callaway, John E. 740th Tank Battalion 557

Calligan, William R. Army Air Force 893

Callinan, Pete D Company, 103rd Medical Battalion, 28th Infantry Division 612

Calmeyn, Patricia Civilian Child 893

Caloger, George 101st Airborne Division 383

Caloway, Elmer P. USS Sterett 726

Cameron, Robert P. US Army 426

Camien, John 1st Battalion 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 327

Campagnone, Joseph 120th Engineer Battalion, 45th Infantry Division 419

Campana, Victor W. D Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Campbell, Abbie N. Women's Army Corps 379

Campbell, Bob US Marine Photographer 401

Campbell, Chuck USS Johnston 565

Campbell, Donald E. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Campbell, E. D. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Campbell, Joseph S. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Campbell, Lloyd USS Johnston 565

Campbell, R.J. British Royal Air Force 737

Campbell, Scotty USS Franklin 186

Campbell, Walter 761st Tank Battalion 402

Campbell, Wilson H. USS Sterett 726

Cancilla, Sammy D Company, 103rd Medical Battalion, 28th Infantry Division 508

Candler, Harry 91st Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Canham, Charles D. 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 384 403

Canham, Francis A. 321st Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Canning, Douglas S. US Army Air Corps 737

Cannon, Charles 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Cannon, Frederick B. 680th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 17th Airborne Division 893

Cannon, George 6th Marine Defense Battalion 753

Cannon, Howard W. 440th Troop Carrier Group 893

Canterbury 776th Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Capaldo, Gilbert B. Army Air Force 893

Capelluto, Harold A. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Caplan, Leslie US Army 763

Caplik, Alphonse A. B Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cappa, Michael US Navy, Ship U.S.S. Cowie 893

Cappelletti, Francis US Army Air Corps 595

Cappelli, Albert 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Capps, A. R. USS Sterett 726

Carafa, Edward 10th Mountain Division 785

Carberry, Francis E Company, 161st Infantry Regiment 18

Carberry, P. A. USS Sterett 726

Card, Charles B Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 150

Card, Earl E. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cardell, Daniel 761st Tank Battalion 402

Cardinal, Bud British Royal Air Force 737

Carel, Davidson USS Sterett 726

Carey, James W. 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Cariello, Nick F Company, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 620

Carl, Marion VMF-112 VMF - 223 416 753 754928

Carlino, Matthew J. (BlackDog) F. Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division 893

Carlquist, Robert A. USS Sterett 726

Carlsen, K. M. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Carlson, Bob 10th Mountain Division 785

Carlson, Douglas 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Carlson, Evans 2nd Marine Raider Battalion 479

Carlson, George D. D Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Carlson, Irving 10th Marine Defense Battalion 18

Carlson, Kendell E. 4th Fighter Group 765

Carlson, Pershing Y. 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Carlston 773rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Carlucci, A. J. HQ Company, 1st Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd 482

Carmichael, Bud US Army 419

Carmichael, Edward 321st Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 100 383

Carmichael, Edwin M. 91st Bomb Group (Heavy) 265

Carmichael, Quintus E. USS Sterett 726

Carmichael, Ralph V Bomber Command 314

Carmichael, Richard N. 19th Bomb Group 754

Carmichael, Virgil "Hoagie" 2nd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Carmody, Doan Pilot, US Navy 754

Carnes, J. H., Jr. USS Sterett 726

Carney, Art 28th Infantry Division 465

Carney, Philip 1st Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Carney, Robert B. Chief of Staff to Admiral Halsey 171 565765

Caron, Francis J. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Caron, George R. 509th Composite Group 296 299

Carolthers, Thomas H. 2nd Armored Division 727

Carowick, Edward P. 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Carpenter, Arthur US Navy 345

Carpenter, Frank J. 101st Airborne Division 383

Carpenter, Glenn J. H Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Carpenter, Ott 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Carpenter, William R. 2nd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Carper, Norwood G. Jr. Army Air Force 893

Carpinone, Victor A. 314th Troop Carrier Group 893

Carpus, Edward E Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Carr, Bernie 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Carr, Glenn 7th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop 831

Carr, Oliver B. D Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Carr, Paul H. USS Samuel B. Roberts 48 151

Carran, Earl L. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Carrell, Charles A. 2nd Battalion, 401st Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Carrigo, Edward A. Combat Command B, 10th Armored Division 557

Carrithers, Fred M. C Company, 726th Railroad Operating Battalion 422

Carrol, Donald L. USS Sterett 726

Carroll, Francis L. 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Carroll, Frank A. I Company, 334th Infantry Regiment, 84th Infantry Division 557

Carroll, George US Army 557

Carroll, J. B. USS McCall 142

Carroll, Jack F Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 38 482

Carroll, Wells W. "Buzz" USS Liscome Bay 41

Carson, Johnny US Navy 465

Carson, Leonard K. 357th Fighter Group 103

Carson, Marion U.S. Army 831

Carson, Ray 101st Airborne Division 383

Carter, A. H. USS Sterett 726

Carter, Bazzel US Army 419

Carter, Clint USS Johnston 48 151 565

Carter, Donald E. 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Carter, Edward A. Jr. D Company, 56th Armored Infantry Battalion, 12th Armored Division 402 493

Carter, Elmer "Doc" 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 403

Carter, Harry M. Sixth Army Group 575

Carter, Paul D. 1st Battalion, 143rd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 51 594

Carter, Paxton Turner USS Arizona 486

Carter, Ross 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482 629

Carter, Thomas N. 34th Troop Carrier Squadron, 315th Troop Carrier Group 482

Carter, W. D. USS Hornet 810

Carter, Wallace R. A Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 24

Cartledge, Carl H. 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Cartner, Thomas US Army 426

Cartwright, Bob US Army 419

Cartwright, William H. USS Sterett 726

Carver, John L. US Navy 765

Casanova, Pat 551st Parachute Infantry Battalion 482

Case B Company, 741st Tank Battalion 375

Case, Harold F Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Casey, Patrick 1st Air Commando, Fourteenth Air Force 33

Casey, Patrick F Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Cash, Hollis 31st Naval Construction Battalion (Seabees) 115

Casperson, Carl 10th Mountain Division 785

Cason, Lee 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division 384

Cassada, A. W. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cassady, Richard 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group 557

Cassels-Smith, G. R. US Navy 765

Cassiday, Richard 237th Combat Engineer Battalion, 4th Infantry Division 239

Cassidy, Fred "Casey" G Company, 274th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division 183

Cassidy, Patrick 1st Battalion, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 327 383 434

Cassutt, Thomas K. Army Air Force 893

Castignola, Jack 2nd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 374

Castignoli 747th Tank Battalion 375

Castillo, Tony G Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Castle, Gene 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Castleman, Thomas US Army 419

Castner, Lawrence V. US Army 447

Castorini, Guy US Marines 401

Catanuto, Emanuel Army Air Force 45th Infantry Division 353

Cates, Clifton B. 4th Marine Division 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 115 152 185 584

Cather, J. S. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cathey, T. R. Army Air Force 893

Caton, Charles W., Jr. U.S. Army 927

Caughlin, D. J. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Caughran, Walter B. 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cauley, J. B. USS Sterett 726

Cavallero, Nick I Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cavaluzzo, John 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Cavanagh, Eugene G Company, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Cavello, Henry F Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cavender, Charles C. 423rd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division 87 557

Cavenee, Ray E. 136th Infantry Regiment, 33rd Infantry Division 184

Caverly, Floyd USS Tang 323

Cavil, Stanley J. Army Air Force 893

Cavin, Edgar R. 498th Squadron, 345th Bomb Group, Fifth Air Force 173

Cavoli, William 500th Squadron, 345th Bomb Group, Fifth Air Force 173

Cawthon, Charles R. 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 167 324 384 403

Cebelli, Ludwig 307th Airborne Medical Company, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cedenio, Clemente USS Sterett 726

Cekada, Frank General Omar Bradley's Staff 419

Celendano, Paul A Company, 254th Infantry Regiment, 63rd Infantry Division 76

Celentano, Frank A. 546th Squadron 737

Centers, Robert IX Troop Carrier Command, Pathfinder Group 383

Cerny, John Army Air Force, 64th Troop Carrier Group 482 893

Cerra, Joseph 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Cerrachio, Jerry US Army 760

Cervantes, Jose I Company, 161st Infantry Regiment 18

Ceryan, Joseph C. USS Sterett 726

Chace, Donald 2nd Armored Division 727

Chadwick, Joseph C Battery, 377th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion 383

Chaffee, Adna U.S. Army, Brigadier General, I Armored Corps 831 727

Chaffin, Wendell 1st Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division 208

Chaffino, Augustine M. 601st Tank Destroyer Battalion 856

Chaisson, Joseph G. USS Sterett 726

Chamberlin 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 407

Chamberlin Clair C. 212th Marine Fighter Squadron 928

Chamberlin, Rahe US Army 419

Chamberlin, Stephen General MacArthur's Staff 565

Chambers, Frank E Company, 330th Infantry Regiment, 83rd Infantry Division 179

Champagne, J.J. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Chance, Robert H. 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division 375 557

Chancellor, J. E., Jr. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Chandler, Theodore E. US Navy 765

Chaney, J. C. USS Sterett 726

Chaney, James E. U.S. Army Special Observer group, London, England 839

Channery, James C. USS Sterett 726

Chapin, Fred A Company, 291st Combat Engineer Battalion 557

Chapin, Robert 384th Bombardment Group 765

Chaplinski D Company, 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Chapman Scouting Squadron Six, USS Enterprise 361

Chapman, Carlton C Company, 761st Tank Battalion 402

Chapman, Edward F. USS Sterett 726

Chapman, Frederick W. USS Sterett 726

Chapman, Richard H. HQ Company, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Chapman, Robert 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Chapman, Ted 12th Air Support Command 419

Chappell Jr., C.J. VMSB-231 737

Chappell, Julian M. Army Air Force 893

Chappuis, Steve A. 2nd Battalion, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383 557

Charles, Jack US Marines 401

Charlo, Louis F Company, 28th Marine Regiment 401

Charnes, F. S. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Charon, Dick 60th Troop Carrier Group 893

Charron, Raymond A. 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Chase, Charles H. 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383 893

Chase (Chasse?), E. D. 100th Infantry Battalion 578

Chase, Donald 82nd Reconnaissance Battalion 831

Chase, J. A. 10th Mountain Division 785

Chase, William Lieutenant, US Navy, Midway Island 605 737

Chaskins, Lester B Battery, 907th Field Artillery Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Chastain, Bobby USS Johnston 565

Chatfield, Henry H. 2nd Armored Division 727

Chatfield, Lee 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division 487

Chatmon, Earnest 761st Tank Battalion 402

Chatterson, J. L. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Chauncey, Charles "Chuck" 5th Bomb Squadron, 9th Bomb Group, 313th Bomb Wing 775

Chauvin, A. H. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Check, Joseph USS Johnston 565

Cheek, Leonard US Army 419

Cheek, Marion "Mike" Intelligence Officer for Admiral Halsey 565

Cheek, Tom Warrant Officer, US Navy, pilot 605

Cheek, Vernice T. USS Sterett 726

Cheever, Bruce US Marines OSS 505

Cheli, Ralph 38th Bombardment Group, 405th Squadron 754

Cheney US Army (on Iwo Jima at some point) 217

Chenez, Raymond J. USS Sterett 726

Chennault, Claire Lee American Volunteer Group "Flying Tigers" Fourteenth Air Force 33 119 338 443 450 467 536 579

Chennault, John (Jack) US Army Air Force 754 893

Cherry, Henry T. 3rd Tank Battalion, 9th Armored Division Team Cherry 557 831

Chesher, Robert T. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cheslock, John 60th Troop Carrier Group 893

Chesnut, J. T. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Chester, Mike A Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Chestnut A Company, 743rd Tank Battalion 375

Cheves, Wallace R. 274th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division 183

Chewing(or Chewning), Walter US Navy 754

Chiappe, Anthony H. 498th Squadron, 345th Bomb Group, Fifth Air Force 173

Chiasson, Roland US Marines 401

Chicoine, George F Company, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Chidlaw, Benjamin US Army 785

Chilcutt, Landon B Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Childress, Carson "Booger" B Battery, 463rd Parachute Field Artillery Battalion 100

Childress, Clovis C. USS Sterett 726

Childress, Rollin D. 9th Air Force,387th Bombardment Group (M) 765

Childs, Bob 701st Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Chilipka, Julius 5th Bomb Squadron, 9th Bomb Group, 313th Bomb Wing 775

Chilson, Llewellyn M. G Company, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division 331

Chincher, Michael 9th Armored Division 470

Chipps, Carroll US Army 419

Chisholm, Robert I Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Chivvis, William N. 101st Airborne Division 383

Choban, John, Jr. USS Sterett 726

Choy, Frank 1st Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Christ, George E. 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Christensen, Alfred E. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Christensen, Chester B Company, 823rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Christensen, Donald P. 2nd Infantry Division 557

Christensen, Wheatley T. "Chris" G Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Christenson, Burton P. E Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 370 893

Christian, Charles R. I Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Christian, Louis C Company, 161st Infantry Regiment 18

Christian, Thomas J. J. Jr. 375th Fighter Squadron, 361st Fighter Group 12

Christman, Allen American Volunteer Group (Flying Tigers) 737

Christman, Phil E Company, 28th Marine Regiment 401

Christner, John W. Army Air Force 893

Christner, Menno N. C Battery, 80th Anti-Aircraft Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Christy, James V. B Company, 109th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 557

Chudoba, Ed 89th Bomb Squadron, 3rd Attack Group 271 754

Church, Lloyd 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Church, Milt 94th Bomb Group 346

Church, Russell Far East Air Forces 443

Church, William V. D Company, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 136

Chynoweth, Bradford Brigadier General, Commander, Visayan Islands, Philippines 614

Circelli, Frank HQ Company, 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd 482

Claggett, Bladen D. USS Dace 343 565 765

Claggett, Henry B. V Interceptor Command 362

Clairborne, Harry C. US Army Air Corps 737

Clancey, Raymond C. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Clare, Charles E. U.S. Army 920

Clarey, John C. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Clark C Company, 894th Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Clark, Alan D. US Air Force 765

Clark, Albert B. A Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clark, Charles 1st Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Clark, Cullen Jr. E Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clark, Curtis M. 2nd Armored Division 727

Clark, Daniel F Company, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clark, David 10th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 785

Clark, David 101st Airborne Division 383

Clark, Don H. 401st Glider Infantry, 82nd Airborne 893

Clark, Earl 10th Mountain Division 785

Clark, Frank US Army Air Force 416

Clark, George I Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clark, George Rogers US Army 839

Clark, Glen 89th Bomb Squadron, 3rd Attack Group 271

Clark, H. W. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Clark, Hal 52nd Troop Carrier Wing 482

Clark, Harold L. Army Air Force 893

Clark, Harry D., Jr. USS Sterett 726

Clark, Hollis 761st Tank Battalion 402

Clark, James A. 334th Fighter Squadron, 4th Fighter Group 319 765

Clark, Jessie I Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clark, Joseph "Jocko" US Navy 565

Clark, Lloyd G. 93rd Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Clark, Louis Edwin US Army Air Force, weatherman 569

Clark, Louis ` 2nd Armored Division 727

Clark, Mark Wayne II Corps Fifth Army, United States Army 51 66 136 158 321 369 382 415 419 423

468 480 482 498 578 594 756 765 785, 831

Clark, Martin 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Clark, Max D. 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clark, Robert D. USS Sterett 726

Clarke, Bruce C. Combat Command B, 7th Armored Division 4th Armored Division 87 107 341 351 382 470 557,831

Clarke (or Clark) Captain 3rd Bombardment Group, 89th Squadron 754

Clarke, James F. B Company, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Clarkson, Percy W. 33rd Infantry Division 184

Clary, Sidney 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Claudius, Herbert G. USS Austin 307

Clausen C Company, 194th Glider Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division 19

Clawson, Harry H Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Clay, Lucius Commander, American Zone of Occupation, Germany 557

Clay, Roy U. 275th Armored Field Artillery Battalion 557

Clayman, Donald C. 3rd Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division 208

Clayton 103rd Medical Battalion 612

Clayton, George Thomas 29th Infantry Division 419

Clearwater, D. R. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cleckler, Glen US Marines 401

Clee HQ Company, 2nd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd 482

Cleere, I. J. USS Sterett 726

Cleere, Timothy J. USS Sterett 726

Clem, Francis W. Army Air Force 893

Clema, Joe A. 2nd Armored Division 727

Clemens, Martin British Solomon Islands Defense Force 479

Clement, Charles B., Jr. U.S. Army 920

Clement, William T. 6th Marine Division 145

Clements, Mike C Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clenin, John 87th Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division 785

Clever, Robert Doolittle's Raiders 737

Clever, Stanley G Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Click, Lloyd B Battery, 320th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cliff, John C. A Battery, 80th Anti-Aircraft Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Clift, Maurice 2nd Battalion, 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 403

Clifton, John D. A Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 24

Cline, Vincent 47th Bomb Group 419

Clinger, Bill USS Franklin 186

Clippard, John F. Army Air Force 893

Clizbe, Reginald 47th Bomb Group 419

Cloer, Robert 34th Squadron, 315th Troop Carrier Group 893

Cloud, Howard H. IX Troop Carrier Command 893

Clute, James M. USS Sterett 726

Coad, William HQ Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Infantry 92

Division Pathfinders, 9th Troop Carrier Command

Coady, Gerald B Company, 899th Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Coates USS North Carolina 810

Coates, John B. United States Army 893

Cobb, Calvin H. Task Group 99.1 Task Group 51.21 Task Group 95.5 Battleship 310

Cobb, James Service Battery, 924th Field Artillery Battalion 557

Cobb, John D Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Cobb, Roy W. E Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 370 893

Cobbler, John H. US Army 557

Cochran, James A Company, 814th Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Cochran, Jesse USS Johnston 565

Cochran, John H. Jr. 3rd Battalion, 359th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division 298

Cochran, Philip G. 1st Air Commando Group, Fourteenth Air Force 33 52 348

Cochran, William H. Jr. VMF-112 416

Cochran, William J. USS Sterett 726

Cochrane, Burt 47th Bomb Group 419

Cochrane, Frank 761st Tank Battalion 402

Cockle, George G Company, 325th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Cocklin, Robert 93rd Infantry Division 264

Coddington, Robert E. H Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Codman, Charles R. Aide to General Patton 402

Coen, Oscar 71st Eagle Squadron, RAF 4th Fighter Group US 765

Cofer, Horace 82nd Airborne Division 482

Coffee, Dan 1st Armored Division 831

Coffeen, William I. VMF-213 5

Coffenberg D Company, 777th Tank Battalion 200

Coffin, Albert P. Pilot, US Navy 754

Coffinger, Harlin E. D Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 580

Cohen, Cecil 34th Bomb Group 765

Cohen, Harold "Hal" 10th Armored Infantry Battalion, 4th Armored Division 269 432

Cohen, Harold 2nd Ranger Battalion 53

Cohen, S.S. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cohn, Mitchell Scouting Squadron Six, USS Enterprise 361

Coker, Cecil F. 2nd Battalion, 272nd Infantry Regiment, 69th Infantry Division 200

Colbert, Paul E. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Colburn, Calvin D. USS Sterett 726

Colburn, Douglas C. USS Sterett 726

Colburn, Robert C. L. Army Air Force 893

Colclough, Oswald S. USS North Carolina 810

Cole, Albert B. USS Sterett 726

Cole, D. R. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cole, Darrell 1st Battalion, 23rd Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division 115

Cole, Richard E. Doolittle's Raiders 737

Cole, Robert 3rd Battalion, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 434

Cole, Robert G. 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383 384

Cole, Robert G. 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment 893

Cole, Ronald E Company, 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 167

Cole, Warren D Company, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Coleby, Ralph A. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Colella, Mike E Company, 325th Regimental Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Coleman, Andrew J. A Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 24

Coleman, Carlyle "Carl" 70th Tank Battalion E Company, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Inf. Div. 457

Coleman, Donald USS Johnston 565

Coleman, Earl US Marines 388

Coleman, George T. 3rd Battalion, 164th Infantry Regiment, Americal Division 264

Coleman, Kenneth 761st Tank Battalion 402

Coleman, Max US Army Rangers 384

Coleman, Stephen D. (Dusty) 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Coleman, Wilson 2nd Armored Division 727

Coley, Lewis USS Alden 565

Colgan, William B. 87th Fighter Squadron, 79th Fighter Group 57

Collet, John A. Pilot, US Navy 754

Collias, Gust E. 401st Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group 265

Collier, Claire B. Army Air Force 893

Collier, Eugene F. 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment 108

Collier, George 761st Tank Battalion 402

Collier, John H. "Pee Wee" Combat Command A, 2nd Armored Division 557 727

Collier, Lawrence J. U.S. Army 920

Collier, Oscar A. USS Sterett 726

Collier, William XX Corps 831

Collins, Arthur 130th Infantry Regiment, 33rd Infantry Division 184

Collins, "Chief" Ninth Air Force 419

Collins, Clarence C. 106th Infantry Division 87

Collins, David C Company, 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Collins, Harry J. 42nd Infantry Division 130

Collins, Henry 42nd Infantry Division 369

Collins, James USS North Carolina 810

Collins, James F. US Army Air Corps 737

Collins, J. Lawton "Lightning Joe" VII Corps 140 193 344 375 403 482 487 524 557 831

Collins, Kenneth W. 3rd Battalion, 109th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 557

Collins, Leroy P. 34th Infantry Division Northern Ireland Base Command (Provisional) 839

Collins, M.E. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Collins, Philip C Company, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 287

Collins, Richard J. 24th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division 254

Colodonato, Michael 907th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Colombo, Anthony 3rd Battalion, 5307th Composite Unit 593

Coltharp, Chester A. 498th Squadron, 345th Bomb Group, Fifth Air Force 173

Columbi, Gerald 82nd Airborne Division 384

Colville, Richard I Company, 161st Infantry Regiment 18

Colvin, Raymond Company F, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 893

Combs, Carl E. USS Sterett 726

Combs, Rex A Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Comer, Richard J. K Company, 424th Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division 557

Comet, Bud USS Samuel B. Roberts 445

Comin, Clark M. B Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Comly, Dave 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Compton, "Buck" E Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383 893

Compton, David 94th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Compton, Homer USCG Taney 310

Compton, Keith K. "K.K." 376th Bomb Group 737

Comstock, Carl 307th Air Medical Company, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Condo, Richard 10th Mountain Division 785

Condon, John US Marines, Aviator 753

Conger, Jack E. 212th Marine Fighter Squadron 928

Conkin, Earnest 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division 832

Conklin C Company, 773rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Conley, Arthur J. USS Anacapa 452

Conley, T. F. Destroyer Squadron 56 114

Conlin, John A Company, 701st Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Conlin, John B Company, 291st Combat Engineer Battalion 358 557

Conlon, George USS North Carolina 810

Conn, Coleman E. USS Sterett 726

Connally, John USS Essex 343

Connarn, William M. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Connell, Collen R. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Connelly, Francis M. 558th Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion 501

Connelly, John W. 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Connelly, Matthew J. 82nd Airborne Division 482

Conner, Mervin B. Jr. 92nd Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Conners, Francis A Company, 823rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Connery, Augustus V. US Army Air Force 754

Connole, Joseph D Company, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 136

Connor, James D. USS Sterett 726

Connor, James P. 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division 423

Connor, Thomas R. 93rd Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Connors, Vincent "Pete" 34th Infantry Division 419

Connors, William P. USS Sterett 726

Conrad D Company, 103rd Medical Battalion, 28th Infantry Division 508 612

Conrad, Fred C Battery, 377th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion 383

Considine, William 1st Battalion, 164th Infantry Regiment, Americal Division 264

Constantino, Benjamin F. 96th Squadron, 440th Troop Carrier Group 92 893

Contrera, Carlo 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Conway, Henry 761st Tank Battalion 402

Coogan, Jackie US Army 465

Cook, Edgar L. E Company, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cook, Ezra 2nd Armored Division 727

Cook, Gilbert R. XII Corps 406

Cook, Isaac B Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cook, James B. USS Sterett 726

Cook, James L. 212th Marine Fighter Squadron 928

Cook, Joseph W. USS Sterett 726

Cook, Julian A. 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div 255 316 482 893

Cook, Lester B. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cook, Richard L. E Company, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division 557

Cook, Robert L. 86th Mountain Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division 839

Cook, Tom A Company, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 156

Cooksey, Clyde W. US Marines 765

Cooley, John W. A Battery, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division 580

Coolidge, Frank US Army Air Force OSS 505

Coomer, Jennings 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Coon, Lyle 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cooney, James D. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Coons, Charles H. 2nd Armored Division 727

Cooper, Davis 376th Bomb Group 603

Cooper, J. E. USS John D. Ford 180

Cooper, John 110th Field Artillery Battalion, 29th Infantry Division 167 403

Cooper, John 463rd Parachute Field Artillery Regiment 91 100

Cooper, John L. 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cooper, K. T. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cooper, Theodore 761st Tank Battalion 402

Cooperider, Claiborne 505th Service Company, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cooter, Walter D Company, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Coover, C.L. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cope, Albert A. U.S. Army 920

Cope, Robert K. 92nd Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Copeland, Carrol C Company, 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 557

Copeland, Robert E. 500 th Bomb Group, 73 rd Bomb Wing 599

Copeland, Robert. W. USS Samuel B. Roberts 48 58 151 445

Copeland, William 907th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Coperato, Jimmy US Navy 385

Coplin 21st Fighter Group 217

Coppage, Everet A. 91st Bomb Group 265

Coppola, Edward USS Sterett 726

Corey, Ralph 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 279

Corgill, James N. Jr. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Corl, Harold B Company, 15th Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division 127

Corlett, Charles H. "Pete" 35th Infantry Division, Kiska Task Force, 7th Infantry Division,, XIX 447 403 756 727

Corley, Quinn M. 314th Troop Carrier Group 893

Corman, Danny H Company, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Cormier, Norman US Army 419

Corning, James Lieutenant, US Army 578

Corrado, Martin 2nd Ranger Battalion 53

Correa, Justo 1st Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Correll, Jim USS Johnston 565

Corrigan, John J. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Corrigan, Thomas F. 92nd Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Corrin, Thomas 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Corry, Roy A. 212th Marine Fighter Squadron 928

Cort, Hugh 24th Infantry Division 304

Corti, John P. F Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Corts, Robert J. HQ Company, 526th Armored Infantry Battalion 97

Corwin, Charleton, W. Jr. 96th Squadron, 440th Troop Carrier Group 92 893

Cory, Merle Ralph 5th Marine Regiment 330

Coryell, Ralph 37th Reconnaissance Troop 831

Cosby, John 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Coslett, Audrey G. Scouting Squadron Six, USS Enterprise 361

Cota, Norman D. 29th Infantry Division 28th Infantry Division Task Force C, 29th ID 24 88 146 167 193 324 375 384 403

Cote, Jules E. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cote, Ronald E Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 403

Cotten, Thomas M., Jr. USS Sterett 726

Cotter, John J. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Cotton Captain, 103rd Medical Battalion, 28th Infantry Division 612

Cotton, Tom 75th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group 33

Couch, George A Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Coughlan, Thomas P. USS Sterett 726

Coumbre, Vernon USS Essex 810

Course, Kenneth 907th Glider Field Artillery Battalion 383

Courtney, Bill 2nd Ranger Battalion 384

Courtney, Edward F. 551st Parachute Infantry Battalion 482

Courtney, Henry A. Jr. 2nd Battalion, 22nd Marine Regiment, 6th Marine Division 188 374

Courtney, James 2nd Ranger Battalion 53

Courtright, Ben F. U.S. Army 920

Coustillac, Henry G. 80th Anti-Aircraft Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Coutts, James "Lou" 513th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division 187 586

Covey, Kenneth A. G Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Covington C Company, 741st Tank Battalion 375

Cowan, Kay B. B Company, 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division 557

Cowan, William B. 3rd Battalion, 112th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 557

Coward, George Jr. D Troop, 90th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Coward, Jesse G. Destroyer Squadron 54 114 726

Cowdrey, Roy B. USS Sterett 726

Cowling, William 42nd Infantry Division 130

Cowne, G. B. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cowser, Walter H. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Cox, Austin Barrisford Air-Ground Rescue, China 138

Cox, Earl L. F Company, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Cox, Harris Admiral Halsey's Staff 565

Cox, Lee 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cox, O. L. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cox, Robert H. USS Sterett 726

Cox, William V. USS Sterett 726

Cox, X. B. Jr. 81st Anti-tank Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383 893

Coxon, Donald E Company, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Coy 746th Tank Battalion 375

Coy, Charles R. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Coykendall,, Thaddeus 2nd Armored Division 727

Coyle, James J. E Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Coyle, Strimple 212th Marine Fighter Squadron 928

Crabb, Frederick C. 2nd Armored Division 727

Craig, Edward 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 88

Craig, Louis A. 9th Infantry Division 193 487

Craig, William H. 1st Battalion, 423rd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division 557

Craighead, Paris B. E Company, 194th Glider Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division 613

Cram, Jack R. US Marines 754

Cramer, Harold C Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Cramer, Jack 5th Bomb Squadron, 9th Bomb Group, 313th Bomb Wing 775

Crampton, R. W. Signal Corps 200

Crandall, Claude D. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Crandall, Harold 101st Airborne Division 383

Crane, Robert Air Transport Command 579

Cranford, Fletcher P. 101st Airborne Division 383

Cratty, Jacob W. (Jake) 94th Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Crawford 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division 482

Crawford, James S. 78th Armored Artillery Battalion 727

Crawford, Marvin F Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Crawford, Max L. C Troop, 18th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 557

Crawley, John W. A Company, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Crawley, Marshall 3rd Battalion, 41st Infantry 727

Creamer, Robert Army Air Force 893

Creary, Hal M. 3rd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Creason, Everett L. 401st Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group 265

Crecy, Warren "Iron Man" 761st Tank Battalion 402

Creed, George H. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Creek, Roy E. 1st Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Creel, George US Army, reconnaissance unit 557

Creery, Arthur C. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Crellin, Erwin US Army Air Force, Philippines 362

Crews, Sidney W. US Army Air Force 754

Crews, William K. 101st Airborne Division 383

Cribbs, William T. USS Sterett 726

Crickenberger, William 291st Combat Engineer Battalion 358 557

Crilley, Joseph C Company, 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion 383

Crim 21st Fighter Group 217

Cripe, C. V. Ninth Air Force 419

Crippen, Paul David US Navy 545

Crippen, Walter Eugene US Navy 546

Crissinger, Bruce A Company, 823rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 557

Critchell, Laurence 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 557

Critchfield, James H. 2nd Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 267 578

Crittenberger, Willis D. IV Corps 785 727

Croce, Avio Silvio USS Hilo 221

Crocker, J. A. USS North Carolina 810

Crockett, Fred US Army 270

Croeker, Brad B Company, 15th Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division 127

Cromelin, P. B., Jr. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Crommelin, John USS Liscome Bay 41

Crook, Arthur M. 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Crooks, Donald Reconnaissance Platoon, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Abn. 482

Crosley, Marvin L. 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cross, Junior L. USS Sterett 726

Cross, Leslie 43rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Cross, Tom 8th Infantry Division 193

Cross, William B Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Crossman, Raymond C Battery, 456th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Crotts, Howard C Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Div. 383

Crouch, Joel L. Army Air Force, 9th Troop Carrier Command 92 893

Crouse E Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Crowder, Charles H. H Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Crowe, Frank US Marines 401

Crowe, G. B. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Crowe, Henry Pierson "Jim" 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division 388 407

Crowley, John F. USS Sterett 726

Crowley, V. N. Jr 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Crown, Richard 384th Bombardment Group 765

Cruickshank, C. E. USS Sterett 726

Cruise, Les H Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Crum, Dr. Marion M. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Crury, Fredrick 3rd Cavalry Group 831

Crutcher, William A. 593rd Field Artillery Battalion 264

Cruzen, Richard Operations Officer for Admiral Kincaid 565

Cudo, Frank J. D Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 580

Cuenca, Frank L. Coast Guard 150

Cuff, Robert 29th Infantry Division 403

Culbertson, A. T. (Cubby) Army Air Force 893

Culberson, Omer W. 354th Fighter Group 765

Culin, Curtis G. 102nd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 375 402, 831 727

Culin, Frank 87th Infantry Division 402

Culin, Frank L. 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division 447

Culler, Daniel 44th Bomb Group 623

Cullerton, Edward F. Army Air Force 893

Culpepper, Mal 327th Bomb Squadron, 92nd Bomb Group 376

Culver, Frank L. 66th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division 727

Cumbee, J. L. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Cummings B Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cummings, Russell L. 91st Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Cummings Jr., S. Fred 27th Armored Infantry Battalion 557

Cundriff, Woodrow 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Cunin, Kenneth A. 83rd Chemical Battalion 839

Cunningham, Clare 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 594

Cunningham, Fred C. C Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Cunningham, Grover D. USS Sterett 726

Cunningham, Julian Baldy Force, 43rd Infantry Division 528

Cunningham, Robert US Army 384

Cunningham, Winfield Scott US Navy, Wake Island Detachment 333 352 520

Curb, Clarence 31st Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Curl, James M. 66th Squadron, 57th Fighter Group 765

Curran, James J. K Company, 25th Infantry Regiment, 93rd Infantry Division 264

Curreri, Joseph 82nd Troop Carrier Squadron 383

Currey, Francis S. K Company, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division 358 557

Curry, Ellsworth P. Army Air Force 893

Curry, V. G. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Curtin, William C. I Company, 157th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division 130

Curtis, Donald 4th Marine Regiment 45

Curtis, Larry 75th Squadron, 435th Troop Carrier Group 893

Cushing, Wilson J. 9th Air Force, 387th Bombardment Group (M) 765

Cushman, Robert 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division 115

Cusmano, Bernard A. H Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Div. 482

Custer, Stephen A. 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division 279

Cutler, Richard W. I Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482


Military

8/24/2009 - ELMENDORF AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska (AFNS) -- Several members of the 3rd Bombardment Group reunited here Aug. 12 through 16 to honor an important chapter in the 3rd Wing's history.

The 3rd BG, which was also known as the 3rd Attack Group, was stationed in Australia during World War II and is today's 3rd Wing.

The members who reunited here were the same men responsible for stopping the Japanese advance in the South Pacific during World War II. They also sank a convoy of up to 24 ships during the Battle of the Bismarck Sea March 4, 1943, and participated in bombing Japanese forces in Rabaul, New Britain, Nov. 2, 1943, also known as "Bloody Tuesday."

"I don't know if we all thought a lot about it," said retired Col. Bill Beck. "We were there and that's all there was to it."

Colonel Beck served as a pilot for the 3rd BG from March 1942 through June 1943. He said his times with the 3rd BG were, "Good times to look back on."

The 3rd BG was one of the first air-combat groups to deploy during World War II. Originally stationed in Savannah, Ga., the 3rd BG was assigned to Australia Feb. 25, 1942, two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Japanese began forming a line from Alaska's Aleutian Islands all the way down to Australia. However, the 3rd BG was placed in Australia before the Japanese troops could advance any further south, preventing them from advancing farther and forcing them back north.

Members from the 3rd BG recalled moments and battles they were involved in to help push the Japanese away from Australia.

"The Battle of the Bismarck Sea was significant because bombers had attacked and sunk major naval ships," said retired Brig. Gen. William Webster, a pilot for the 3rd BG. "The dramatic part of coordinating an attack like this is you have 50 to 60 fighters up above, and there's spent shell casings falling all over just like rain, and the B-25 (Mitchell) as loud as it's . and guns firing, it's really a test of the ear drums."

General Webster also recalled moving to Charters Towers, Australia, when the group first arrived. He said the tents were hot and they had to worry about diseases such as malaria, "jungle rot" and "dengue fever."

In addition to the diseases, General Webster said they worried about the meals they ate, such as canned bully beef, canned cheese and powdered eggs and milk.

This was the life for the 3rd BG Airmen while stationed in Australia during World War II. Many stories and memories can be told from the remaining veterans of that era.

The group has had 19 reunions since the early 1980s. This is their 20th reunion and scheduled to be their final one.


3rd Wing [3rd WG]

The 3rd Wing is the host unit for Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. It is the largest and principal organization in Eleventh Air Force.

Its mission is to support and defend U.S. interests in the region and around the world by providing units who are ready for worldwide air power projection and a base that is capable of meeting PACOM's theater staging and throughput requirements.

Elmendorf AFB lost one squadron of F-15C air superiority aircraft and one squadron of F-15E air-to-ground aircraft as a result of BRAC decisions. Since World War II, Elmendorf AFB has provided an advanced location on U.S. soil for projection of U.S. global interests. Elmendorf AFB has F-15C and F-15E missions with the organizational structure and basic infrastructure communication links to support fighter aircraft. Elmendorf is the only remaining base from those originally evaluated which meets the needs for an F-22A Operational Wing. Of the original bases with F-15C operational air superiority aircraft, missions, and training airspace, Elmendorf AFB is the only base which meets the original selection criteria for an Operational Wing beddown, meets national needs for location, and has the capacity to beddown the Second F-22A Operational Wing.

The Air Force decided to establish (beddown) the Second Operational Wing of F-22A Raptors at Elmendorf Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska to support the F-22A program. The purpose of the Elmendorf AFB-based F-22A Operational Wing is to have national assets positioned to rapidly respond to the directives of the President and Secretary of Defense and to provide the Air Force with the capability to meet mission responsibilities that include rapid worldwide deployment. The Elmendorf AFB beddown would involve basing 36 F-22A Primary Aircraft Inventory (PAI) and 4 Backup Aircraft Inventory (BAI) constructing new facilities, modifying existing Elmendorf AFB facilities changing personnel and conducting flight training operations in existing Alaskan Special Use Airspace (SUA).

Elmendorf was proud to be the home of two new F-22 squadrons (totaling 40 aircraft). The 3rd Wing at Elmendorf Air Force Base activated the 525th Fighter Squadron during a ceremony at the base 29 October 2007. The second active-duty F-22 Raptor squadron took its place in wing history nearly three months after the aircraft officially landed on base. With the unfurling of the 525th Tactical Fighter Squadron flag, the 525th became active again after 15 years. The 525th Fighter Squadron had 20 aircraft assigned when it became fully operational by the end of 2008.

The 525th FS's legacy began in February 1942 as the 309th Bombardment Squadron (Light) to support allied forces in the European theater of operations during World War II. Nearly 18 months after activation, the unit saw its first combat in Sicily. In August 1943, the 309th BS was redesignated as the 525th Fighter-Bomber Squadron. Since then, the 525th received several designations: fighter squadron from 1944-1950, fighter-bomber squadron again from 1950-1954, fighter-interceptor squadron from 1954-1969 and tactical fighter squadron from 1969 until being inactivated in 1992.

In 2007, following the 2006 decision to beddown the second F-22 operational wing at Elmendorf AFB, 42 of the 60 F-15 primary aircraft assigned to then Elmendorf AFB were replaced by 36 F-22 primary and four backup aircraft. Subsequently, the remaining F-15C squadron of 18 primary aircraft was reassigned from Elmendorf AFB, leaving what is now JBER with 36 F-22 primary aircraft. The Proposed Action is to beddown six additional primary and one backup F-22 aircraft conduct flying sorties at the base with F-22s operating with approximately 25 percent of departures from the cross-wind runway train in existing Alaskan airspace and implement personnel changes to conform to the F-22 Wing requirements. The additional F-22s would result in two squadrons each with 21 primary and two backup F-22 aircraft, and one attrition reserve aircraft, for a total of 47 F-22 aircraft.

The existing F-22 operational wing at JBER consists of two squadrons of 18 primary aircraft each, plus a total of three backup aircraft. With the proposed plus-up, each of the two F-22 squadrons at JBER would be composed of 21 primary aircraft plus two backup aircraft. The two-squadron F-22 operational wing would include 42 primary aircraft, four backup aircraft, and one attrition reserve aircraft for a total of 47 aircraft.

The wing trains and equips an Air Expeditionary Force lead wing comprised of 6,700 personnel and as of 2005 was able to deploy 42 F-15C, 21 F-15E, 2 E-3B, 18 C-130H, and 3 C-12F/J anywhere in the world. The 3rd Wing also provides air superiority, surveillance, tactical airlift, and agile combat support forces for global deployment, while maintaining the installation for critical force-staging and throughput operations in support of worldwide contingencies. The wing also provides medical care for all forces in Alaska.

Operating just across the Bering Strait - a mere 44 miles from the former Soviet Union - the 3rd Wing provides air superiority and defense for Alaska with F-15C aircraft. The wing supports the Alaskan North American Aerospace Defense Command Region mission and flexible alert concept by deploying aircraft and crews to Galena and King Salmon airports periodically. These forward operating bases allow the F-15s a quicker response time on identifying aircraft approaching North American airspace. At Elmendorf, the aircraft stand alert 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

In addition, the 3rd Wing supports Pacific Air Forces in the Pacific Command area of responsibility. This mission includes the wing's F-15E "Strike" Eagle aircraft, which fly long-range interdiction.

With its C-130H Hercules and C-12 aircraft, the wing also provides airlift in support of two major missions: airborne training for the Army's 6th Infantry Division (Light) and airlift support for Eleventh Air Force, including logistical support, fighter deployment support, resupply of remote long-range radar sites and special assignment airlift missions for Alaskan and Canadian Distant Early Warning stations.

The major operational components of the wing include three fighter squadrons, the 12th "Dirty Dozen," 19th "Gamecocks," and the 90th "Pair-o-Dice" one airlift squadron, the 517th "Firebirds" and one airborne air control squadron, the 962nd. The fighter units are trained to actively engage and destroy enemy air forces in either an offensive or defensive capacity.

The newest fighter squadron is the 12th, which came to Elmendorf from Kadena Air Base, Japan, in April 2000. The 90th joined the wing in May 1991, along with the 517th Airlift Squadron in April 1992, and the 962nd AACS in October 1992.

The 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing moved to Elmendorf from Clark Air Base December 19, 1991. In the move, the 3rd was redesignated the 3rd Wing, an objective wing in which group commanders are responsible for specific functional missions.

The 3rd Operations Group is primarily responsible for the flying mission of the wing. It includes the 12th, 19th, and 90th Fighter Squadrons, 517th Airlift Squadron, 962nd Airborne Air Control Squadron, an operations support squadron and a standardization and evaluation component.

The 3rd Logistics Group provides direct support to the flying mission through the maintenance, supply, transportation, contracting and logistics support squadrons.

The 3rd Support Group provides a variety of support functions to the 3rd Wing, plus more than 25 associate units and civilian agencies throughout the state. Within the group are the mission support, security police, services, communications, comptroller and civil engineer squadrons.

The 3rd Medical Group is the first medical center to be organized as an objective hospital. In addition to the care they provide in house, they also serve aeromedical evacuation patients and are responsible for the wartime manning and deployment of two air transportable hospitals. The group consists of aerospace medicine, dental, medical support, and medical operations squadrons.

The 3rd Wing, in one form or another, has served the United States on a continuing basis since its activation as the U.S. Army Surveillance Group on 1 July 1919. Including squadrons active in World War I (the 19th and 90th Fighter Squadrons) the wing and its organizations have participated in virtually every major U.S. conflict of the 20th century. The U.S. Army Air Service emerged from World War I with three distinct missions, pursuit, bomber, and attack/observation. These organizations became today's 1st Fighter Wing, 2nd Bomb Wing, and 3rd Wing.

As the first organized attack group to form within the Army Air Service, the 3rd Attack Group was instrumental in developing close air support doctrine in the inter-war period. The group pioneered dive bombing, skip-bombing, and parafrag attacks in the 1920s--the earliest forms of precision guided attack from aircraft--and put this work to good use in World War II. Notable alumni include the immortal Hoyt Vandenberg, Jimmy Doolittle, Lewis Brereton, Richard Ellis, John "Jock" Henebry, Paul I. "Pappy" Gunn, and Nathan Twining. As an attack bomber group during World War II and the Korean War, the wing was honored by the selfless service of two posthumous Medal of Honor recipients, Maj Raymond H. Wilkins and Capt John S. Walmsley.

Nicknamed the "Grim Reapers," the group forged a peerless record in World War II, and emerged as the most highly decorated unit in the Pacific Theater. Under the inspired engineering improvisations of Maj Paul "Pappy" Gunn, the 3rd Group converted conventional medium bombers into fearsome, deck-level commerce raiders that struck terror wherever the group appeared in combat. In attacks on Japanese freighters and troop transports in the Battle of the Bismarck Sea, 3-4 March 1943, the 3rd Attack Group's aircraft scored one of the most decisive aerial victories of all time sinking at least 12 Japanese ships on the way to relieve beleaguered New Guinea garrisons. From that time forward, the 3rd Wing has never ceded air supremacy in its operations.

After the formal independence of the United States Air Force, 18 September, 1947, groups were realigned into a new wing structure the 3rd Attack Group became the 3rd Bombardment Wing (Light, Attack). Flying A-26 Invaders, the 3rd Wing participated from the first bombing sortie to the very last during the Korean War. The first Americans to lose their lives during the Korean War, 1Lt Remer L. Harding and SSgt William Goodwin, were assigned to the 13th Bomb Squadron, 3rd Bombardment Wing when they lost their lives 28 June 1950 returning from a sortie on the Korean Peninsula. In recognition of the wing's distinguished service, the 3rd Bombardment Wing was granted the privilege of conducting the last bombing mission over North Korea minutes before implementation of the ceasefire of 27 July 1953.

After the Korean War, the wing transitioned to B-57 jets in 1955-56. The wing stood nuclear alert in Japan and Korea for 10 years during the height of the Cold War. As the conflict in Southeast Asia escalated in 1964, the 3rd Wing transformed into a light attack unit flying primarily F-100 Supersabres along with other attack aircraft from Bien Hoa AB, South Vietnam. From 1965-1970, the wing flew thousands of sorties in support of allied forces, and conducted the combat acceptance testing of the A-37 Dragonfly--as it had done with the A-2, A-3, A-8, A-12, A-17, A-18, A-20 and A-26 in previous years.

After its withdrawal from Southeast Asia in 1971, the wing transitioned to F-4 Phantoms and moved to Kunsan, Korea, scene of much of its success during the Korean War. By 1975, the wing moved to Clark AB, Republic of the Philippines, helping that nation transform into a stable democracy. The Wing deployed six F-4Es to Turkey for Operation Desert Storm in early 1991 where they flew some of that aircraft's last combat sorties. The wing remained at Clark AB, though treaty negotiations with the Philippines broke down, and it was decided to move the 3rd Wing beginning in 1992-93. The Mt Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 changed these plans and forced the wing's hasty relocation to Elmendorf on 19 December 1991.

The wing has won five Distinguished Unit Citations, two Presidential Unit Citations, twelve Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards (three with the combat "V" device), 33 campaign and service streamers, and four foreign government citations.

In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD recommended to realign Elmendorf AFB by distributing 24 of 42 of the 3d Wing's assigned F-15C/D aircraft to the 1st Fighter Wing, Langley Air Force Base, VA. This recommendation would also distribute a portion of the F-15C/Ds at Elmendorf Air Force Base (36-fighter) to Langley Air Force Base (2-fighter). Elmendorf would retain one squadron (18 aircraft) for air sovereignty missions and would distribute the remaining 24 F-15Cs to Langley Air Force Base.

DoD also recommended to realign Elmendorf Air Force Base. The 366th Fighter Wing, Mountain Home Air Force Base, ID, would receive F-15E aircraft from the 3d Wing, Elmendorf Air Force Base, AK (18 aircraft), and attrition reserve (three aircraft).