Annwan- AKA-53 - History

Annwan- AKA-53 - History

Annawan

Asachem, or chief, of the Wampanoag Indians who lived during the latter half of the 17th century and served under King Philip as a military leader and counselor. When King Philip was killed in August, 1676, Annawan rallied the Wampanoag warriors, led them in escaping from a swamp in which they were surrounded, and carried on a guerrilla campaign against the New England colonists. He was captured later that year and was beheaded at Plymouth, Mass., by order of the colonial authorities.

(YN-50: dp. 95; 1. 71'0"; b. 19'0"; dr. 10'6")

Russell No. 15-a tug build in 1935 at Brooklyn, N.Y., by Ira S. Bushey & Sons--was purchased by the Navy on 28 October 1940 from Newton Creek Towing Co., of New York City; renamed Annawan the following day; designated YN-50: modified for naval service by the New York Navy Yard; and placed in service there on 8 January 1941.

The net tender was assigned to the 1 st Naval District and arrived in Narragansett Bay to commence duty on 20 January 1941. Annawan spend her entire career tending nets and operating as a tug in the 1 st Naval District. On 8 April 1942, she was redesignated YNT-18. Later, on 4 August 1945, Annawan became a medium harbor tug with the alphanumeric hull designation YTM-739. On I September 1946, she was placed out of service. Found to be surplus to the needs of the Navy, Annawan was turned over to the Maritime Commission on 6 May 1947 for disposal. Her name was finally struck from the Navy list on 20 December 1948.


USS Achernar (AKA-53)

USS Achernar (AKA-53) was an Andromeda-class attack cargo ship in the service of the United States Navy, named after the star Achernar. She served as a commissioned ship for 19 years and 5 months. She was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract on 6 September 1943 at Kearney, New Jersey by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., launched on 3 December 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Adela Rogers St. John, acquired by the Navy on 29 January 1944, and commissioned on 31 January 1944 with Comdr. H. R. Stevens in command.


ACHERNAR AKA 53

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Andromeda Class Attack Cargo Ship
    Keel Laid September 6 1943 - Launched December 3 1943

Struck from Naval Register February 2 1965

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

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Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
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Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

Post Office Established January 31 1944 - Disestablished December 9 1946

Fleet Post Office
Navy 128
Pearl Harbor Br.

In 1950 with no post office aboard, the yeoman used a cachet as if it were a cancel
USCS Postmark Catalog

Post Office Reestablished March 20 1951 to December 19 1955

Locy Type
FDPS 2 Apr 2, 1951

Post Office Reestablished 1961 - Disestablished July 1 1963

Other Information

ACHERNAR earned 3 Battle Stars for WWII
* Invasion of Normandy
June 6-25 1944
* Invasion of southern France
September 15-25 1944
* Okinawa Gunto operation
Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto, April 1-19 1945

Earned 3 Battle Stars for Korea
* Inchon Landing
September 13-17 1950
* North Korean Aggression
September 18 to October 30 1950
* Communist China Aggression
November 14-18 1950

Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons.
Combat Action Ribbon - American Campaign Medal - Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal (2) - Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (1) - World War II Victory Medal - National Defense Service Medal - Korea Service Medal (3) - United Nations Service Medal - Republic of Korea War Memorial Medal

Personnel Awards.
Purple Hearts 5 KIA, 41WIA, April 2 1945

NAMESAKE - Named for the brightest star in the southern constellation Eridanus with a magnitude of .6. It is at least 200 times more luminous than the sun and one of the 10 brightest stars in the sky. It is about 118 light-years from the Earth

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Thirty ships of the Andromeda Class were built between 1943 and 1945. The ships were named after certain stars and U. S. state counties. Achernar's name comes from the star Achernar. The star is seen mostly from the Southern Hemisphere. Its official designation is Alpha Eridani, and it is located in the Constellation of Eridanus (which means 'the river'). This constellation was discovered by the Ancient Greeks, who named it after their river god, Eridanus. Achernar originally comes from the ancient arabic "Akhir Al Nahar", which means 'the end of the river'. Achernar is the 9th brightest star in the sky, and its diameter is twice that of the Sun.

Achernar's keel was laid down under a U. S. Maritime Commission contract on 6 September 1943 at Kearney, New Jersey by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. Launched on 3 December 1943, she was sponsored by Mrs. Adela Rogers St. John. She was formally acquired by the Navy on 29 January 1944 and was commissioned on 31 January 1944 with Commander H. R. Stevens in command.

Following conversion and fitting out at the New York Navy Yard, Achernar got underway on 28 February 1944 and held shakedown in the Chesapeake Bay. On 13 March, she arrived at Staten Island, N.Y., where she loaded cargo and embarked Army personnel for transportation to Great Britain. She stood out to sea on 19 March with Convoy CU-18. She arrived at Swansea, Wales on 30 March and spent the next two months transporting cargo and personnel between various ports in the United Kingdom in preparation for the Normandy invasion.

The last week in May 1944 found Achernar in Plymouth, England. On 1 June she was designated the 1st Army's headquarters ship (Lieutenant General Courtney Hodges commanding). On 6 June she steamed across the English Channel, and at 1609 she anchored in her preassigned position in Baie de la Seine, France. For the next five days she acted as a nerve center for troops fighting for a foothold in France. On 11 June the 1st Army's headquarters disembarked, and at 1148 Achernar got underway for England. After a three-day respite in Plymouth, the ship moved to Roseneath, Scotland to take on the cargo and personnel of two construction battalions. On 19 June she returned to Plymouth to onload materials to repair damaged assault craft, and on 22 June she got underway for the assault area in France. While on station, she underwent several enemy air attacks. The ship again left the French coast on 29 June to return to England and arrived in Plymouth on 1 July. On 5 July she was ordered to sail as part of Task Group (TG) 120.6, which was bound for the Mediterranean to support the invasion of southern France. The ship entered the harbor at Oran, Algeria on 10 July. Six days later she sailed to Naples, Italy. After loading operations there, she switched to an anchorage at Castellamare, Italy on 2 August. She then embarked personnel of the 36th Division and proceeded to sea on the 13th for the assault in southern France. On the morning of 15 August, her crew commenced discharging her cargo and sending it to the beaches. The next day, after finishing the delivery of cargo, she received casualties on board and embarked 13 German prisoners of war before getting underway at 2100 to return to Naples.

For the next two months Achernar continued making trips from Naples and Oran to points along the southern coast of France. On 25 October she sailed from Oran westward through the Strait of Gibraltar towards the United States. She arrived at Hampton Roads on 8 November and underwent repairs and overhaul at the Norfolk Navy Yard. On 7 December Achernar got underway for a brief period of trials and exercises in Chesapeake Bay. The ship returned to Norfolk on 11 December 1944, took on cargo, and got underway on 18 December. She transited the Panama Canal on Christmas Day 1944 and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 10 January 1945.

Following tactical maneuvers off Oahu from 17 to 19 January, the cargo ship began loading cargo on 12 February and put to sea on the 18th. Achernar stopped at Eniwetok on 26 February, Kossol Roads on 4 March, and anchored in San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands from 15 to 20 March before arriving off Okinawa on 1 April to support the seizure of that key island. At 0043 the next day, 2 April 1945, a Japanese suicide plane hit the Achernar's starboard side and, almost simultaneously, a bomb, apparently released by the suicide plane, exploded on her port side. Fires broke out, and the ship began listing slightly to port. Achernar lost five crew members killed and 41 wounded.

By 0100 the fires were out and the list had been corrected. At 1525 the battered ship transferred her casualties to Solace (AH-5) and proceeded to anchor off Hagushi beach, where temporary repairs began. Bos'n. Frank J. McMahon later received the Navy Commendation Medal for successfully rigging number 3 hatch, which was damaged by the suicide plane, using winches and running gear from number 2 hatch. On the morning of 3 April, Achernar moved to Kerama Retto to begin unloading her cargo.

Achernar remained at Okinawa until 19 April, when she sailed for the United States via Ulithi and Pearl Harbor. She arrived at San Francisco on 13 May and began offloading ammunition and fuel. Two days later, she entered drydock for repairs and overhaul. She got underway again on 10 July for shakedown along the California coast. On 4 August Achernar left San Francisco to return to Pearl Harbor where she arrived a week later and immediately began discharging her cargo. She was still in Hawaii when hostilities ended on 15 August 1945. Achernar then shuttled personnel and equipment between Japan, various other Pacific islands, and took part in "Magic Carpet" operations, returning veterans to the United States.

On 28 November 1945, Achernar arrived in Seattle. One week later, S.S. H. H. Raymond collided with her in a storm. As a result of the damage she sustained in the accident, Achernar entered drydock on 22 December for repairs.

Achernar got underway again on 16 January 1946 and resumed operations between the west coast and various ports in the Far East and the Pacific. When the Military Sea Transportation Service was formed on 1 October 1949, she was one of a group of attack cargo ships selected for service in the new organization, continuing her visits to Pacific and Far East ports. During August of 1949, Achernar participated in Barex-49, a supply expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska, hauling in supplies and getting out before the permanent ice cap closed in again. On the way back to Seattle, Achernar called at Nome, Alaska.

At the outbreak of the Korean War, Achernar was completing overhaul at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. She got underway on 7 July 1950 and soon began onloading troops and cargo for transportation to the war zone. On the 14th, the ship joined TG 53.7 and sailed for Japan. She unloaded her cargo at Kobe, Sasebo, and Yokosuka. On 13 September, she left Japan and participated in the invasion of Inchon, Korea on the 15th. After landing the embarked Marines and unloading her cargo, Achernar returned to Japan for more cargo. On 22 October, elements of the First Marine Division and their equipment were loaded on aboard Achernar for landing on the east coast of Korea at Wonsan. She sailed as part of TG 90.2 and arrived in Wonsan on 25 October. She unloaded her passengers and proceeded to Moji, Japan, arriving there on 31 October. There she took on men of the 2nd Infantry Division for transportation to Wonsan. Following this mission, she returned to Yokosuka on 20 November. The attack cargo ship was then ordered to report back to the United States. She left Japan on 27 November accompanying U.S.S. Brush (DD-745) and U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), both of which had been damaged by mines off Korea, to lend support in the event their temporary repairs did not hold. They made brief stops at Midway and Pearl Harbor before reaching San Francisco on 17 December.

Following a short availability period, Achernar went to Port Hueneme, California, on 18 January 1951 to onload cargo and personnel for transportation to the Aleutians. After unloading at Amchitka, she visited Adak, Whittier, and Kodiak Island, Alaska to pick up cargo to be returned to Seattle. On 17 March Achernar set course for Norfolk, Virginia. She transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and paused at Morehead City, North Carolina, on 1 April. She finally arrived at Norfolk on 3 April. The ship was assigned to the Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet, and took part in various fleet exercises and cargo runs in the Caribbean and along the east coast. On 18 February 1956, Achernar was decommissioned, placed in reserve, and berthed at Orange, Texas.

Achernar was again placed in commission at New Orleans on 1 September 1961. She arrived at Norfolk on 1 December 1961 and became a unit of Amphibious Squadron 6, Atlantic Fleet. Achernar held shakedown in the Caribbean and spent the remainder of her career conducting various training exercises in the Virginia Capes operating area.

Achernar was placed out of commission for the second time on 1 July 1963 and transferred to the U. S. Maritime Administration. She was reacquired by the Navy on 29 January 1964, but saw no active service before she was transferred to the government of Spain on 2 February 1965. She served the Spanish Navy as Castilla (TA-21) until she was scrapped in 1982.

Achernar received three battle stars for World War II service and three battle stars for Korean War service.


She was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract on 6 September 1943 at Kearney, New Jersey by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., launched on 3 December 1943, named after the star Achernar, sponsored by Mrs. Adela Rogers St. John, acquired by the Navy on 29 January 1944, and commissioned on 31 January 1944 with Commander H. R. Stevens in command.

Following conversion and fitting out at the New York Navy Yard, Achernar held shakedown in the Chesapeake Bay. On 13 March, she arrived at Staten Island, New York — where she loaded cargo and embarked United States Army personnel for transportation to Britain travelling with Convoy CU-18. She arrived at Swansea, Wales on 30 March and spent the next two months transporting cargo and personnel between various ports in the United Kingdom in preparation for the Normandy invasion.

On 1 June 1944, she was designated as First Army's headquarters ship. On 6 June, she steamed from Plymouth across the English Channel and anchored in her preassigned position in Baie de la Seine, France. For the next few days, she acted as a nerve center for troops fighting for a foothold in France. On 11 June, the First Army's headquarters disembarked, and Achernar returned to England. After a three-day respite in Plymouth, the ship moved to Rosneath, Scotland to take on the cargo and personnel of two construction battalions. On 19 June, she returned to Plymouth to load materials to repair damaged assault craft and, on 22 June, got underway for the assault area in France. While on station, she underwent several enemy air attacks. Achernar left France on 29 June to return to England and arrived in Plymouth on 1 July. On 5 July, the ship was ordered to sail as a part of Task Group 120.6, which was bound for the Mediterranean Sea to support the invasion of southern France. It arrived at Oran, Algeria on 10 July then six days later sailed to Naples. After loading cargo there, she moved to an anchorage at Castellammare, Italy on 2 August. Here, she embarked personnel of the 36th Infantry Division and proceeded to sea on 13 August for the landings in southern France. On the morning of 15 August, her crew commenced discharging her cargo and sending it to the beaches. The next day, after finishing the delivery of cargo, she received casualties on board and embarked 13 German prisoners of war before getting underway to return to Naples.

For the next two months, Achernar continued making trips from Naples and Oran to points along the southern coast of France. On 25 October, she sailed from Oran westward through the Strait of Gibraltar towards the United States. She arrived at Hampton Roads on 8 November and underwent repairs and overhaul at the Norfolk Navy Yard. On 7 December, Achernar got underway for a brief period of trials and exercises in Chesapeake Bay. The ship returned to Norfolk on 11 December, took on cargo, and got underway on 18 December. She transited the Panama Canal on Christmas Day 1944 and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 10 January 1945.

Following tactical maneuvers off Oahu from 17 to 19 January, the cargo ship began loading cargo on 12 February and put to sea on 18 February. Achernar stopped at Eniwetok on 26 February, Kossol Roads on 4 March, and anchored in San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands, from 15 to 20 March, before arriving off Okinawa on 1 April to support the seizure of that key island. At 0043 the next day, a Japanese suicide plane hit the starboard side and, almost simultaneously, a bomb exploded on her port side. Fires broke out, and the ship began listing slightly to port. Achernar lost five crew members killed and 41 injured.

By 0100, the fires were out and the list had been corrected. At 1525, Achernar transferred her casualties to USS Solace and proceeded to anchor off Hagushi beach, where temporary repairs began. On the morning of 3 April, Achernar moved to Kerama Retto to begin unloading her cargo. She remained at Okinawa until 19 April, when she sailed for the United States via Ulithi and Pearl Harbor. The vessel arrived at San Francisco on 13 May and began offloading ammunition and fuel. Two days later, she entered drydock for repairs and overhaul. She got underway again on 10 July for shakedown along the California coast. On 4 August, Achernar left San Francisco to return to Pearl Harbor, where she arrived a week later and immediately began discharging her cargo. She was still in Hawaii when hostilities ended on 15 August. Achernar then shuttled personnel and equipment between Japan, various other Pacific islands, and took part in "Magic Carpet" operations, returning veterans to the United States.

On 28 November, Achernar arrived in Seattle, Washington. One week later, SS H. H. Raymond collided with her during a storm. As a result of the damage she sustained in the accident, Achernar entered dry dock on 22 December for repairs. Achernar got underway again on 16 January 1946 and resumed operations between the west coast and various ports in the Far East and the Pacific. AKA 53 made two trips to the Pribiloff Islands bringing back to Seattle fur seal pelts and products for a Fouck Fur Company of Saint Louis. In 1947 she made a trip to the Philippines, Japan and China. Subic Bay, Yokuska, Shanghai, Tsingtao were visited but a scheduled visit to Tiensen was curtailed because of fighting between the Nationals and the Communists in 1947.

When the Military Sea Transportation Service was formed on 1 October 1949, she was one of a group of attack cargo ships selected for service in the new organization. At the outbreak of the Korean War, Achernar was completing overhaul at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. She got underway on 7 July 1950 and soon began onloading troops and cargo for transportation to the war zone. On 14 July, the ship joined TG 53.7 and sailed for Japan. She unloaded her cargo at Kobe, Sasebo, and Yokosuka. On 22 September, she left Japan and proceeded to Inchon, Korea, to support nearby ground operations.

After American forces had liberated the territory near Inchon and Seoul, elements of the 1st Marine Division and their equipment were loaded on board Achernar for landing on the east coast of Korea at Wonsan. She sailed as part of TG 90.2 and arrived in Wonsan on 25 October. She unloaded her passengers and proceeded to Moji, Japan, arriving there on 31 October. There, she took on men of the 2nd Infantry Division for transportation to Wonsan. Following this mission, she returned to Yokosuka on 20 November.

The attack cargo ship was then ordered to report back to the United States. She left Japan on 27 November accompanying the destroyers USS Brush and USS Mansfield — both of which had been damaged by naval mines — ready to assist them, if necessary. They made brief stops at Midway and Pearl Harbor before reaching San Francisco on 17 December.

Following a short availability period, Achernar went to Port Hueneme, California on 18 January 1951 to onload cargo and personnel for transportation to the Aleutians. After unloading at Amchitka, she visited Adak, Whittier, Alaska, and Kodiak Island to pick up cargo to be returned to Seattle. On 17 March, Achernar set course for Norfolk. She transited the Panama Canal on 26 March paused at Morehead City, North Carolina on 1 April and finally arrived at Norfolk on 3 April. The ship was assigned to the Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet, and took part in various fleet exercises and cargo runs in the Caribbean and along the east coast. On 18 February 1956, Achernar was decommissioned, placed in reserve, and berthed at Orange, Texas.

Achernar was placed back in commission at New Orleans on 1 September 1961. She arrived at Norfolk on 1 December 1961 and became a unit of Amphibious Squadron 6, Atlantic Fleet. Achernar held shakedown in the Caribbean and spent the remainder of her career conducting various training exercises in the Virginia capes operating area.

Achernar was again placed out of commission on 1 July 1963 and transferred to the Maritime Administration. She was reacquired by the Navy on 29 January 1964 but saw no active service before she was transferred to the government of Spain on 2 February 1965. She served the Spanish Navy as Castilla (TA-21) until scrapped in 1982.

Achernar received three battle stars for World War II service and three battle stars for Korean War service.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.


Annawan Genealogy (in Henry County, IL)

NOTE: Additional records that apply to Annawan are also found through the Henry County and Illinois pages.

Annawan Birth Records

Birth index prior to 1916, Henry County, IL, vol. 3 Genealogy Gophers

Annawan Cemetery Records

Annawan Census Records

Federal Census of 1940, Annawan Township, Illinois LDS Genealogy

Federal Census of 1940, Annawan Village, Illinois LDS Genealogy

United States Federal Census, 1790-1940 Family Search

Annawan Death Records

Annawan Histories and Genealogies

History of Annawan 1877 US Gen Web Archives

Annawan Immigration Records

Annawan Land Records

Annawan Marriage Records

Annawan Probate Records

Annawan School Records

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Annwan- AKA-53 - History

A star in the constellation Aquila.

(AKA-55: dp. 14,200 1. 459'2" b. 63' dr. 26'4" s. 16.5 k., cpl. 392 a. 1 5", 4 40mm., 18 20mm. cl. Andromeda T. C2-S-B1)

Alshain (AKA-55) was laid down on 29 October 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 209) at Kearny, N.J. by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Iaunched on 26 January 1944, sponsored by Mrs. J. H. King, acquired by the Navy on 31 March 1944 and placed in commission at Brooklyn, N.Y., on 1 April 1944, Comdr. Roland E. Krause in command.

After fitting out at the New York Navy Yard, the new attack cargo ship got underway for shakedown training in the Chesapeake Bay. She entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for an availability on 27 April, took on cargo early in May and sailed for the Hawaiian Islands on the 13th. Alshain transited the Panama Canal, joined the Pactfic Fleet, and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 2 June. There she reported for duty to Commander, Amphibious Forces, Pactfic Fleet. The ship was ordered to return to San Diego to serve as an amphibious training ship, and she set a course for the west coast of the United States.

Alshain reached San Diego on 20 June but was ordered to replenish fuel and provisions and return to Hawaii. Upon her arrival at Pearl Harbor on the 28th, she was assigned to temporary Transport Division (TransDiv) 38 and began loading combat cargo and Army personnel scheduled to participate in the invasion of Guam. On 1 July, the vessel set sail for Eniwetok to join Task Force 51 as a part of the Southern Transport Group. The combined forces sortied from that atoll on 17 July and arrived off Agat Beach, Guam, on the 21st.

Landing operations began early that morning. Alshain had difficulty unloading her cargo due to a shortage of boats and congestion on the beach itself. She finally completed the process
on 3 August and retired toward Eniwetok. The ship then sailed independently to Pearl Harbor where she embarked more Army troops and loaded their equipment before getting underway on 27 August for amphibious landing rehearsals at Lahaina Roads, Maui. On 15 September, Alshain sailed with Task Group (TG) 33.1 for Eniwetok and a planned invasion of Yap. However, the attack on Yap was later conceled, and Leyte Philippines, was substituted as an objective. The cargo vessel departed Eniwetok on 26 September, bound for Manus, Admiralty Islands, the forward staging area for the assault on Leyte.

Alshain reached that port on 3 October and made final preparations for the invasion of the Philippines. On 14 October, she sortied with TG 79.1 which entered Leyte Gulf on the 20th. Alshain anchored in the transport area off Dulag, Leyte, and began lowering her boats at 0730. Despite enemy air harassment, the unloading proceeded so smoothly that the ship completed her work on the 23d and headed back to Seeadler Harbor, Manus.

Getting underway again on 7 November, Alshain proceeded to Hollandia, New Guinea, to take on the personnel and material of the Army Air Service Command. She then rendezvoused with other ships off Biak, Schouten Islands, to form Task Unit (TU) 79.15.4, which proceeded to Leyte Gulf to reinforce Allied forces in the Philippines.

The task unit arrived in the waters off Tanauan, Leyte, on the 118th and underwent aJapanese air attack that morning. Alshain joined the others in firing on the enemy intruders. One "Zeke" approached the cargo ship and dived from directly astern in what seemed to be a strafing or dive bombing attack. However, intense antiaircraft fire caused the plane to burst into flames and it splashed close aboard Alpine (APA-92), anchored 800 yards away. The next day, Alshainleft Tanauan to return to Seeadler Harbor.

On 28 November the cargo ship sailed for Finschhafen, New Guinea paused there on the 29th and then pressed on to Bougainvllle, Solomon Islands, arriving in Empress Augusta Bay on 1 December. She embarked members of the 37th Infantry Division and got underway on the 16th for training exercises in Huon Gulf, New Guinea. Alshain finished the exercises and returned to Manus on the 21st. On the last day of 1944, she sortied with TG 79.1 for the assault on Luzon, Philippines.

The ships passed through Surigao Strait, the Mindanao and Sulu Seas, and entered the South China Sea on 8 January 1945. On that day, when a small group of enemy planes attacked the transports, Alshain helped to fight off the attack. She continued on toward Luzon, entered the Lingayen Gulf on the 9th, and unloaded her cargo. The ship then returned to Leyte to embark personnel for landings to be conducted in the San Felipe-San Narciso area of Luzon.

The vessel sailed on 26 January to waters off Luzon, disembarked her passengers on the 29th, and returned to Leyte Gulf on 1 February. During the next two months, the cargo ship remained in Philippine waters replenishing supplies, assisting in unloading merchant ships, and carrying out training exercises in preparation for the invasion of Okinawa. She left the Philippines on 27 March with Task Unit (TU) 51.13.1 and arrived off Okinawa on 1 April.

The Japanese struck back with numerous air attacks against Allied shipping in an attempt to ward off the assault. On 1 April a kamikaze crashed into Alpine which was anchored some 400 yards away. Alshain rescued a badly burned soldier who had been blown offAlpine's deck by the crash. The attack cargo ship completed her unloading on the 5th, withdrew from the area and headed for Apra Harbor, Guam. She then proceeded via Pearl Harbor to Seattle, Wash., where she entered the Lake Washington Shipyard, Houghton, Wash., on 2 May for an availability.

After the completion of the yard period on the 18th, the ship took on cargo at Tacoma, Wash. and proceeded to San Francisco. During this run, trouble developed with the superheater tubes in the boilers. Alshain entered the Bethlehem Steel Co. repair yard at San Francisco on 2 June for two weeks of repair work. On the 16th, the ship set a course for Eniwetok and spent a fortnight in port there in early July before getting underway for Guam.

Alshain reached Apra Harbor on 18 July and discharged a portion of her provisions. Her next destination was Tulagi Solomon Islands, where she paused on 10 August to take on supplies. The vessel reached Noumea, New Caledonia, on the 14th. Here, she received word of Japan's capitulation.

After the end of the war, Alshain continued her role as a cargo supply ship. Among the islands she served during the next three months were Eniwetok, Guam, and Okinawa. The ship reached Pearl Harbor on 3 December and discharged her cargo. On the 16th, she got underway for Seattle, Wash. On that same day, the ship also detached from Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet. Alshain reached Seattle on 23 December and prepared to enter the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for an extended availability.

In May 1946, the ship was assigned to the Naval Transport Service and resumed her cargo supply runs to various points in the Pactfic. She left San Francisco on 7 June for a cruise via Pearl Harbor to Okinawa and Sasebo, Japan. She departed Japanese waters on 7 August bound for the east coast of the United States. The vessel transited the Panama Canal on 2 September and reached Norfolk on the 8th. She remained there for a month and then made a brief trip to Davisville, R.I. After touching back at Norfolk, Alshain continued on south to transit the Panama Canal on 21 October and reached Terminal Island, Calif., on the 30th.

Alshain commenced another tour of Far Eastern ports on 22 November. Among her ports of call were Guam, Pearl Harbor Yokosuka, Japan Tsingtao and Shanghai, China, Okinawa, and Subic Bay and Samar, Philippines. Alshain arrived back in San Francisco on 7 August 1947 and spent five months there, interrupted only briefly late in November by a run to San Diego. On 2 January 1948, the vessel began a series of trips carrying supplies and equipment to Guam from San Francisco. Four were completed between January and August 1948.

After a period of yard work at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in October and November, Alshain got underway for the western Pactfic. During this trip, she carried several tons of ammunition to Chinese Nationalist forces on Formosa delivered supplies at Subic Bay and Yokohama, Japan visited the ports of Shanghai and Tsingtao on the Chinese mainland, and touched at Guam before reporting back to San Francisco on 7 March 1949.

Alshain operated along the west coast from March through July. On 21 July, the ship set out from San Francisco, bound via Pearl Harbor for Guam, where she arrived on 7 August. During her stay at that island, the cargo ship became a part of the newly formed Military Sea Transportation Service. She left Guam on 15 September, transited the Panama Canal on 9 October, and arriyed off Onslow Beach, N.C., on the 15th. Two weeks later, the vessel moved to the Hampton roads area but sailed for Caribbean waters on 10 November, and touched at Port-auPrince, Haiti, four days later. After paying one more call at Norfolk, Alshain transited the Panama Canal on 15 December reached San Francisco on 30 December, and closed the year there in upkeep.

Alshain set sail for Guam on 26 January 1950. She arrived back at San Diego on 27 March. After operations along the California coast, the cargo ship shaped a course for Japan on 26 April. She visited Yokosuka and Yokohama in May and touched at Naha, Okinawa, and Guam before pulling back into port at San Francisco on 26 June.

The outbreak of war in Korea caused Alshain to depart San Diego on 14 July with elements of the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade embarked for transportation to Korea. The ship sailed with TG 53.7 from Yokosuka to Pusan, Korea, where she arrived on 2 August. Upon completion of debarking operations, the cargo vessel reached Yokosuka on the 7th. The ship then passed under the control of Amphibious Group 1, was fitted out to receive special boats for amphibious operations, and conducted training exercises late in August in Chigasaki Bay off Honshu, Japan.

Alshain reported to Kobe, Japan, on 2 September to take on equipment, supplies, and personnel of the 1st Marine Division. On the 11th, she got underway for the invasion of Inchon, Korea. The vessel entered the transport area off Inchon on 15 September and began unloading operations which continued until the 21st. Touching at Kobe on the 24th, Alshain embarked supplies and equipment of the 1st Marine Division and Marine Air Group 33 and moved to Sasebo, Japan, on 9 October to top off her fuel tanks before getting underway later that same day for Inchon.

On 11 October, Alshalin reached the Inchon area and loaded equipment and supplies for an upcoming amphibious operation. She departed Inchon on the 17th with TG 90.2 bound for Wonsan Korea. However, clearance of mines delayed the start of the assault on Wonsan and the task group was forced to retire along its approach route and wait. In the interim, South Korean forces moving north captured Wonsan and obviated the need for an assault landing. Thus when Alshain returned on the 26th to unload cargo and disembark troops, no enemy harassed her cargo operations, and she completed the mission on the 31st.

Alshain retraced her course to Japan and arrived at Moji on the island of Kyushu on 2 November. There, she began embarking troops of the 3d Infantry Division for transportation to Wonsan. The ship arrived in the Wonsan area on 14 November and, by the 17th, had completed discharging her passengers. She then paused briefly at Yokohama for a four-day availability period before setting out for the west eoast of the United States on 25 November. The vessel reached San Franeisco on 11 December.

After three months of local operations and upkeep, Alshain left California on 16 Mareh 1951, bound for the east coast. She navigated the Panama Canal on 1 April and continued on to Norfolk, where she arrived on the 15th. The ship left the Military Sea Transportation Serviee on 30 April to become a member of Amphibious Forees, Atlantie Fleet, and was assigned to TransDiv 23. She was involved in a series of local operations and training exercises at Onslow Beach, N.C., through 4 August when she got underway for her first Mediterranean cruise. The ship replenished ships of the 6th Fleet at Golfe Juan, France from 17 to 25 August. She then proceeded to Port Lyautey Morocco, and replenished naval shore activities located there. Early September found Alshain back in her new home port Norfolk.

Her next mission sent the cargo ship to Morehead City, N.C., to take on marines for participation in LantFlex 52 off Vieques Island, Puerto Rico. Alshain arrived at Vieques on 1 October. During the cruise, whe also made port calls at Bridgetown Barbados and Port of Spain, Trinidad. The shin left the Caribbean on 5 November, took part in an amphibious fending exercise on Onslow Beach on the 13th, and arrived back in Norfolk on the 18th.

In early January 1952, Alshain commenced her second Mediterranean tour. Her first stop was Naples, Italy, on 24 January. She then made a short trip to Suda Bay, Crete, and returned to Naples on 9 February. From 25 February through 16 March the ship took part in Operation "Grand Slam," held m conjunction with naval units of NATO allies. She later made port calls at Porto Scudo and Palermo, Sicily Iraklion, Crete Phaleron Bay, Greece Beirut, Lebanon and Cannes, France.

Returning from her Mediterranean cruise to Norfolk on 24 May, Alshain engaged in various exercises off the eastern seaboard and in Puerto Rican waters. A visit to New York City during the Fourth of July holiday period highlighted the ship's summer. After a three-week layover in the Norfolk area during the Christmas holidays, Alshain got underway on 4 January 1953 for amphibious landing exercises at Vieques. In lateJanuary, she headed north and entered the Boston Naval Shipyard on 1 February for availability.

Alshain resumed operations on 18 April and headed down the east coast toward the Caribbean for refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, which lasted from 10 until 29 May. During this period, the cargo vessel was involved in two minor collisions: one with Mount OIympus (AGC-8) on 13 May and the other a few days later with Niobara (AO-72). These necessitated a restricted availability for the cargo ship for repairs from 23 June through 3 July at the Maryland Drydock Co., Baltimore, Md.

Upon completion of the yard work, Alshain began operations along the east coast. In late September, she transported darines from Morehead City to Vieques Island for amphibious training exercises. She returned to home port on 3 October and closed the year in an upkeep status. The cargo ship moved to Boston in late January 1953 for a period of repairs and alterations which lasted through mid-April.

Alshain sailed for the Caribbean from Norfolk on 6 May. She visited Guantanamo Bay and Port-au-Prince before reversing course back to Norfolk. The ship operated in the Norfolk area through 8 August, when she got underway for a cruise to Yokohama with a cargo of ammunition, air base equipment, and personnel of Marine Air Group 11. She touched en route at Port Everglades, Fla., transited the Panama Canal on 15 August visited San Diego for two days in late August, and finally reached Yokohama on 10 September.

The cargo ship discharged her passengers and their equipment in Japan and got underway for her return trip on the 16th. Brief layovers at San Francisco, Calif., and Balboa, Canal Zone
preceded her arrival in Norfolk on 22 October. The ship then entered an extended tender availability. She began the year 1954 with a trip to the Caribbean for TRAEX 2-54 at Vieques Island. On 19 January, Alshain touched at Port Everglades and took on board elements of Marine Air Group 32. After debarking the troops at Morehead City, the cargo ship returned to Norfolk on the 28th.

For the duration of 1954, Alshain was engaged in a series of short training cruises. In mid-February, she made a round-trip voyage to San Juan and Vieques, Puerto Rico, for landing operations and, upon her return, entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for an availability. She then operated in the area of Norfolk and Little Creek, Va., the Chesapeake Bay, and Onslow Beach and Morehead City, N.C. The ship was involved in LANTFLEX 1-55 in November off Onslow Beach.

Alshain began her last year of active duty, 1955, by picking up elements of the Fleet Marine Force at Morehead Citv. On 7 January 1955, she left the east coast en route to the Mediterranean. Alshain touched at Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria, on the 20th. She was then involved in amphibious operations in the Gulf of Arzew off Algeria. The ship continued on to visit Genoa and Naples, Italy Istanbul, Turkey, Athens and Phaleron Bay, Greece, Suda Bay Crete Cannes and Marseilles, France, Porto Scudo, Sardinia and Barcelona, Spain. Alshain left Barcelona on 14 May and shaped a course back to the United States. Upon her arrival at Norfolk on the 28th, the ship began a period of leave and upkeep.

Alshain got underway in late June for Philadelphia. She entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on 1 July to undergo preinactivation overhaul. The work was completed in early October, and the vessel proceeded to Orange, Tex., where she was placed in a reserve status on 12 October 1955. The ship was decommissioned on 14 January 1956 Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1960. She was transferred to the Maritime Administration and laid up at Beaumont, Tex.


Annawan, IL News Breaking News for Annawan, IL continually updated

United Nations experts said on Wednesday they had been unable to find evidence of direct support by Islamic State for an Islamist militia in eastern Congo, which was blacklisted in March by Washington as a terrorist group.

Experts on Central Africa have been debating whether the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), blamed for increasing violence over the past two years in eastern Congo, has genuine links with the Islamic State group based in the Middle East, sometimes known as ISIS or ISIL.

U.S. reopens asylum access for victims of domestic violence, gang violence

The U.S. attorney general on Wednesday rescinded a Trump-era decision that made it harder for victims of domestic violence and gang violence to win asylum, the latest move by U.S. President Joe Biden to create what he says is a more humane immigration system.

Attorney General Merrick Garland, in a three-page legal opinion, wrote that the broad language in the decision put in place during the administration of former President Donald Trump "threatens to create confusion and discourage careful case-by-case adjudication of asylum claims.

Missing American woman found dead in Russia, suspect arrested

A 34-year old American woman who had been missing in Russia since Tuesday has been found dead and a Russian man has been arrested on suspicion of murder, the state Investigative Committee said on Saturday.

Russia's RIA news agency said the woman, which it named as Catherine Serou, had been studying law at a university in the Nizhny Novgorod region 420 km (260 miles) east of Moscow since arriving from California three years ago.

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What Causes Pelvic Organ Prolapse?

Anything that puts increased pressure in the abdomen can lead to pelvic organ prolapse. Common causes include:

  • Pregnancy, labor, and childbirth (the most common causes)
  • Respiratory problems with a chronic, long-term cough
  • Pelvic organ cancers
  • Surgical removal of the uterus (hysterectomy)

Genetics may also play a role in pelvic organ prolapse. Connective tissues may be weaker in some women, perhaps placing them more at risk.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Thirty ships of the Andromeda Class were built between 1943 and 1945. The ships were named after certain stars and U. S. state counties. Achernar's name comes from the star Achernar. The star is seen mostly from the Southern Hemisphere. Its official designation is Alpha Eridani, and it is located in the Constellation of Eridanus (which means 'the river'). This constellation was discovered by the Ancient Greeks, who named it after their river god, Eridanus. Achernar originally comes from the ancient arabic "Akhir Al Nahar", which means 'the end of the river'. Achernar is the 9th brightest star in the sky, and its diameter is twice that of the Sun.

Achernar's keel was laid down under a U. S. Maritime Commission contract on 6 September 1943 at Kearney, New Jersey by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. Launched on 3 December 1943, she was sponsored by Mrs. Adela Rogers St. John. She was formally acquired by the Navy on 29 January 1944 and was commissioned on 31 January 1944 with Commander H. R. Stevens in command.

Following conversion and fitting out at the New York Navy Yard, Achernar got underway on 28 February 1944 and held shakedown in the Chesapeake Bay. On 13 March, she arrived at Staten Island, N.Y., where she loaded cargo and embarked Army personnel for transportation to Great Britain. She stood out to sea on 19 March with Convoy CU-18. She arrived at Swansea, Wales on 30 March and spent the next two months transporting cargo and personnel between various ports in the United Kingdom in preparation for the Normandy invasion.

The last week in May 1944 found Achernar in Plymouth, England. On 1 June she was designated the 1st Army's headquarters ship (Lieutenant General Courtney Hodges commanding). On 6 June she steamed across the English Channel, and at 1609 she anchored in her preassigned position in Baie de la Seine, France. For the next five days she acted as a nerve center for troops fighting for a foothold in France. On 11 June the 1st Army's headquarters disembarked, and at 1148 Achernar got underway for England. After a three-day respite in Plymouth, the ship moved to Roseneath, Scotland to take on the cargo and personnel of two construction battalions. On 19 June she returned to Plymouth to onload materials to repair damaged assault craft, and on 22 June she got underway for the assault area in France. While on station, she underwent several enemy air attacks. The ship again left the French coast on 29 June to return to England and arrived in Plymouth on 1 July. On 5 July she was ordered to sail as part of Task Group (TG) 120.6, which was bound for the Mediterranean to support the invasion of southern France. The ship entered the harbor at Oran, Algeria on 10 July. Six days later she sailed to Naples, Italy. After loading operations there, she switched to an anchorage at Castellamare, Italy on 2 August. She then embarked personnel of the 36th Division and proceeded to sea on the 13th for the assault in southern France. On the morning of 15 August, her crew commenced discharging her cargo and sending it to the beaches. The next day, after finishing the delivery of cargo, she received casualties on board and embarked 13 German prisoners of war before getting underway at 2100 to return to Naples.

For the next two months Achernar continued making trips from Naples and Oran to points along the southern coast of France. On 25 October she sailed from Oran westward through the Strait of Gibraltar towards the United States. She arrived at Hampton Roads on 8 November and underwent repairs and overhaul at the Norfolk Navy Yard. On 7 December Achernar got underway for a brief period of trials and exercises in Chesapeake Bay. The ship returned to Norfolk on 11 December 1944, took on cargo, and got underway on 18 December. She transited the Panama Canal on Christmas Day 1944 and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 10 January 1945.

Following tactical maneuvers off Oahu from 17 to 19 January, the cargo ship began loading cargo on 12 February and put to sea on the 18th. Achernar stopped at Eniwetok on 26 February, Kossol Roads on 4 March, and anchored in San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands from 15 to 20 March before arriving off Okinawa on 1 April to support the seizure of that key island. At 0043 the next day, 2 April 1945, a Japanese suicide plane hit the Achernar's starboard side and, almost simultaneously, a bomb, apparently released by the suicide plane, exploded on her port side. Fires broke out, and the ship began listing slightly to port. Achernar lost five crew members killed and 41 wounded.

By 0100 the fires were out and the list had been corrected. At 1525 the battered ship transferred her casualties to Solace (AH-5) and proceeded to anchor off Hagushi beach, where temporary repairs began. Bos'n. Frank J. McMahon later received the Navy Commendation Medal for successfully rigging number 3 hatch, which was damaged by the suicide plane, using winches and running gear from number 2 hatch. On the morning of 3 April, Achernar moved to Kerama Retto to begin unloading her cargo.

Achernar remained at Okinawa until 19 April, when she sailed for the United States via Ulithi and Pearl Harbor. She arrived at San Francisco on 13 May and began offloading ammunition and fuel. Two days later, she entered drydock for repairs and overhaul. She got underway again on 10 July for shakedown along the California coast. On 4 August Achernar left San Francisco to return to Pearl Harbor where she arrived a week later and immediately began discharging her cargo. She was still in Hawaii when hostilities ended on 15 August 1945. Achernar then shuttled personnel and equipment between Japan, various other Pacific islands, and took part in "Magic Carpet" operations, returning veterans to the United States.

On 28 November 1945, Achernar arrived in Seattle. One week later, S.S. H. H. Raymond collided with her in a storm. As a result of the damage she sustained in the accident, Achernar entered drydock on 22 December for repairs.

Achernar got underway again on 16 January 1946 and resumed operations between the west coast and various ports in the Far East and the Pacific. When the Military Sea Transportation Service was formed on 1 October 1949, she was one of a group of attack cargo ships selected for service in the new organization, continuing her visits to Pacific and Far East ports. During August of 1949, Achernar participated in Barex-49, a supply expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska, hauling in supplies and getting out before the permanent ice cap closed in again. On the way back to Seattle, Achernar called at Nome, Alaska.

At the outbreak of the Korean War, Achernar was completing overhaul at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. She got underway on 7 July 1950 and soon began onloading troops and cargo for transportation to the war zone. On the 14th, the ship joined TG 53.7 and sailed for Japan. She unloaded her cargo at Kobe, Sasebo, and Yokosuka. On 13 September, she left Japan and participated in the invasion of Inchon, Korea on the 15th. After landing the embarked Marines and unloading her cargo, Achernar returned to Japan for more cargo. On 22 October, elements of the First Marine Division and their equipment were loaded on aboard Achernar for landing on the east coast of Korea at Wonsan. She sailed as part of TG 90.2 and arrived in Wonsan on 25 October. She unloaded her passengers and proceeded to Moji, Japan, arriving there on 31 October. There she took on men of the 2nd Infantry Division for transportation to Wonsan. Following this mission, she returned to Yokosuka on 20 November. The attack cargo ship was then ordered to report back to the United States. She left Japan on 27 November accompanying U.S.S. Brush (DD-745) and U.S.S. Mansfield (DD-728), both of which had been damaged by mines off Korea, to lend support in the event their temporary repairs did not hold. They made brief stops at Midway and Pearl Harbor before reaching San Francisco on 17 December.

Following a short availability period, Achernar went to Port Hueneme, California, on 18 January 1951 to onload cargo and personnel for transportation to the Aleutians. After unloading at Amchitka, she visited Adak, Whittier, and Kodiak Island, Alaska to pick up cargo to be returned to Seattle. On 17 March Achernar set course for Norfolk, Virginia. She transited the Panama Canal on the 26th and paused at Morehead City, North Carolina, on 1 April. She finally arrived at Norfolk on 3 April. The ship was assigned to the Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet, and took part in various fleet exercises and cargo runs in the Caribbean and along the east coast. On 18 February 1956, Achernar was decommissioned, placed in reserve, and berthed at Orange, Texas.

Achernar was again placed in commission at New Orleans on 1 September 1961. She arrived at Norfolk on 1 December 1961 and became a unit of Amphibious Squadron 6, Atlantic Fleet. Achernar held shakedown in the Caribbean and spent the remainder of her career conducting various training exercises in the Virginia Capes operating area.

Achernar was placed out of commission for the second time on 1 July 1963 and transferred to the U. S. Maritime Administration. She was reacquired by the Navy on 29 January 1964, but saw no active service before she was transferred to the government of Spain on 2 February 1965. She served the Spanish Navy as Castilla (TA-21) until she was scrapped in 1982.

Achernar received three battle stars for World War II service and three battle stars for Korean War service.


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