439th Troop Carrier Group

439th Troop Carrier Group

439th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF)

History - Books - Aircraft - Time Line - Commanders - Main Bases - Component Units - Assigned To

History

The 439th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the Italian campaign and the invasion of the south of France, Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and the crossing of the Rhine.

The 439th was one of twelve groups to join the Ninth Air Force direct from the United States in the first half of 1944. It reached Britain in March 1944 and joined the Ninth Air Force.

On D-Day the group dropped troops from the 101st Airborne Division in the first attack, then towed gliders to Normandy on D+1. It received a Distinguished Unit Citation and a French citation for its efforts in Normandy.

In July the group's air echelon was sent to Italy, where it was used to fly supplies into newly-liberated Rome and to evacuate wounded Allied personnel. It then took part in Operation Dragoon, the invasion of the South of France. This time it dropped troops from the 517th Parachute Infantry Regiment on the Riviera on 15 August 1944, then towed reinforcements in gliders. The group received another French citation for this campaign.

On 25 August the group returned to the UK, before moving to France in September. For most of the rest of the war it acted as a cargo unit.

During Operation Market Garden the group dropped troops from the 82nd Airborne Division around Nijmegen, then once again towed gliders carrying reinforcements into the area.

During the Battle of the Bulge the group towed gliders carrying supplies to Bastogne on 27 December 1944.

On 24 March 1945 the group transported part of the 17th Airborne Division across the Rhine, with each aircraft towing two gliders which were released near Wesel.

After the end of the war the group converted to the C-46 and helped return some of the millions of displaced people who were attempting to return home after escaping from German captivity. The group returned to the US by September 1945 and was inactivated on 10 June 1946.

Books

Pending

Aircraft

1943-45: Douglas C-47 Skytrain
1945-46: Curtiss C-46 Commando

Timeline

14 May 1943Constituted as 439th Troop Carrier Group
1 June 1943Activated
Feb-Mar 1944To England and Ninth Air Force
Jul-Sep 1945To United States
10 June 1946Inactivated

Commanders (with date of appointment)

Lt Col Ralph L Zimmerman: 1 Jun 1943
Col Charles HYoung: 21 Jan 1944
Col Gordon L Edris:6 Oct 1945
Lt Col Lester C Messenger:16 Apr 1946
Lt Col William M Massengale,Jr: 28 May-10 Jun 1946.

Main Bases

Alliance AAFld, Neb: 1 Jun1943
Sedalia AAFld, Mo: 15 Jun 1943
Alliance AAFld, Neb: 2 Aug 1943
Laurinburg-Maxton AAB, NC: 16 Dec 1943
Baer Field, Ind: 2-14 Feb 1944
Balderton, England:21 Feb 1944
Upottery, England: 26Apr 1944
Juvincourt, France: 8 Sep 1944
Lonray, France: 28 Sep 1944
Chateaudun,France: 4 Nov 1944-11 Jul 1945
BaerField, Ind: Jul 1945
Sedalia AAFld, Mo:7 Oct 1945-10 Jun 1946

Component Units

91st: 1943-1946
92nd: 1943-1946
93rd: 1943-1946
94th: 1943-1946

Assigned To

1943: 53rd Troop Carrier Wing; US Based
1944-45: 50th Troop Carrier Wing; IX Troop Carrier Command; Ninth Air Force
1945-46: 52nd Troop Carrier Wing


439th Airlift Wing

The 439th Airlift Wing (439 AW) is an active United States Air Force Reserve unit. It is assigned to the Air Force Reserve Command, Fourth Air Force, and is based at Westover Air Reserve Base, Massachusetts.

The peacetime mission includes recruiting, training and supervision of personnel to assure mission readiness. The wing is also responsible for the management of aircraft maintenance and all assigned Air Force combat support real property, equipment and supplies.

The 439th has two units that are designated Geographically Separated Units (GSU). They are the 250 reservists serving as members of the 85th Aerial Port Squadron, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, and 100 more comprise the 722nd Aeromedical Staging Squadron at Fort Hamilton, NY.


Upottery

Aerial photograph of Upottery airfield looking west, the main runway runs vertically, barrack sites are to the bottom right of the airfield, 15 March 1944. Photograph taken by No. 541 Squadron, sortie number RAF/CT/91/541. English Heritage (RAF Photography).

Aerial photograph of Upottery airfield looking east, the runways and perimeter are under construction, 9 August 1943. Photograph taken by7th Photographic Group, sortie number US/7PH/GP/LOC14. English Heritage (USAAF Photography).

Aerial photograph of Upottery airfield looking west, the runways and perimeter are under construction, 9 August 1943. Photograph taken by7th Photographic Group, sortie number US/7PH/GP/LOC14. English Heritage (USAAF Photography).

Aerial photograph of Upottery airfield looking west, the runways and perimeter are under construction, 9 August 1943. Photograph taken by7th Photographic Group, sortie number US/7PH/GP/LOC14. English Heritage (USAAF Photography).

Aerial photograph of Upottery airfield looking north east, barrack sites are to the top left of the airfield, the bomb dump is to the bottom left, 22 April 1944. Photograph taken by 7th Photographic Group, sortie number US/7PH/GP/LOC314. English Heritage (USAAF Photography).

Captain Edward Anthony Nachowitz

Lt. Henry Robert Benefiel, USAAF (1910-2000)

Lt Stripling's crew September 1944. I believe his was taken the day before leaving Uppottery.

Known locally as Smeatharpe, Upottery was built during 1943-44 potentially as a USAAF medium bomber, or reconnaissance or transport base. It had three concrete runways, 50 loop hardstandings, and two dispersed T2 hangars. Opened in February 1944 and selected to be a Ninth Air Force transport base, it was occupied by the 439th Troop Carrier Group, equipped with C-47s and C-53s, from April to August 1944.

Although returned to the RAF in October 1944, the station was next occupied briefly by US Navy (USN) PB4Y-1s during November-December 1944, and then by the USN 107th and 112th Patrol Bomber Squadrons, also equipped with PB4y-1s, from January to June 1945.

Returned to the RAF in July 1945, the station was used for storage by Maintenance Command until closed in 1948. The site quickly returned to private ownership and agriculture, although the concrete runways and many hardstands remain, plus some of the wartime buildings albeit in a derelict state. Parts of the airfield are now occupied by the Smeatharpe Stadium for stock car racing plus the Dakota 'Drag and Drift’ Raceway.


Lineage

  • Established as 439th Troop Carrier Group on 14 May 1943
  • Redesignated 439th Troop Carrier Group, Medium on 19 May 1949
  • Redesignated 439th Fighter-Bomber Group on 26 May 1952
  • Redesignated 439th Military Airlift Group and activated on 27 December 1965 (not organized)
  • Redesignated 439th Operations Group and activated in the Reserve, on 1 August 1992.

Assignments

  • I Troop Carrier Command, 1 June 1943
  • Ninth Air Force, c. 10 March 1944
  • IX Troop Carrier Command, 26 August 1944
  • I Troop Carrier Command, September 1945
  • IX Troop Carrier Command, c. December 1945
  • Tactical Air Command, 21 March 1946
  • Third Air Force, unknown 1946-10 June 1946
  • 439th Troop Carrier Wing, 27 June 1949 – 3 April 1951
  • 439th Fighter-Bomber Wing, 15 June 1952 – 16 November 1957
  • Military Air Transport Service, 27 December 1965 (not organized)
  • 322d Air Division, 8 January 1966 – 24 December 1968
  • 439th Airlift Wing, 1 August 1992–present

Components

  • 55th Military Airlift Squadron: 8 January 1966 – 24 December 1968
  • 58th Aerial Port Squadron: 1 August 1992 – 1 October 2002
  • 74th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron: 1 August 1992 – 1 October 1994
  • 85th Aerial Port Squadron: 1 August 1992 – 1 January 1995
  • 91st Troop Carrier (later Fighter-Bomber) Squadron (L4): 1 June 1943 – 10 June 1946 27 June 1949 – 3 April 1951 15 June 1952 – 1 April 1954
  • 92d Troop Carrier (later Fighter-Bomber) Squadron (J8): 1 June 1943 – 10 June 1946 27 June 1949 – 3 April 1951 15 June 1952 – 1 April 1954
  • 93d Troop Carrier Squadron (3B): 1 June 1943 – 10 June 1946 27 June 1949 – 3 April 1951 15 June 1952 – 16 November 1957
  • 94th Troop Carrier Squadron (D8): 1 June 1943 – 10 June 1946 27 June 1949 – 3 April 1951
  • 337th Airlift Squadron: 1 August 1992–present
  • 439th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron: 1 October 1994 – present
  • 439th Air Terminal Squadron (later 439th Aerial Port Squadron): 8 January 1966 – 24 December 1968
  • 439th Materiel Squadron: 8 January 1966 – 24 December 1968
  • 471st Fighter-Bomber Squadron: 1 April 1954 – 1 July 1957
  • 472d Fighter-Bomber Squadron: 1 April 1954 – 16 November 1957

Stations

  • Alliance Army Air Field, Nebraska, 1 June 1943
  • Sedalia Army Air Field, Missouri, 15 June 1943
  • Alliance Army Air Field, Nebraska, 2 August 1943
  • Laurinburg-Maxton Army Air Base, North Carolina 16 December 1943
  • Baer Field, Indiana, 2󈝺 February 1944
  • RAF Balderton (AAF-482), England, 10 March 1944
  • RAF Upottery (AAF-462), England, 26 April 1944
  • Juvincourt Airfield (A-68), France, 8 September 1944
  • Lonray Airfield (A-45), France, 28 September 1944
  • Chateaudun Airfield (A-39), France, 4 November 1944 – 7 September 1945
  • Baer Field, Indiana, 22 September 1945
  • Sedalia Army Air Field, Missouri, 7 October 1945 – 10 June 1946
  • Selfridge Air Force Base, Michigan, 27 June 1949 – 3 April 1951 15 June 1952 – 16 November 1957
  • Rhein-Main Air Base, West Germany, 8 January 1966 – 24 December 1968
  • Westover Air Reserve Base, Massachusetts, 1 August 1992 – present

Aircraft

  • C-47 Skytrain, 1943�
  • C-46 Commando, 1945�, 1952�
  • TC-46 Commando, 1949�
  • F-51 Mustang, 1953�
  • T-33 Shooting Star, 1953�
  • F-80 Shooting Star, 1953�
  • F-84 Thunderjet, 1956�
  • F-86 Sabre, 1957
  • TC-47 Skytrain, 1957
  • C-119 Flying Boxcar, 1957
  • C-118 Liftmaster, 1966�
  • C-124 Globemaster II, 1966�
  • C-131 Samaritan, 1966�
  • C-5 Galaxy, 1992� [3]
  • C-5M Super Galaxy, 2017-present [1]

439th Operations Group

The unit's World War II predecessor unit, the 439th Troop Carrier Group was a C-47 Skytrain transport unit assigned to Ninth Air Force in Western Europe. During Operation Overlord, two serials of aircraft, one of 45 and the other of 36 from the 439th TCG were dispatched late in the evening of 5 June to drop the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment during the first hour of the invasion behind Utah Beach.

Difficult weather conditions and heavy anti-aircraft fire were encountered and three aircraft failed to return. A reinforcement mission with gliders was flown on the following day, with 50 C-47s towing 30 Horsa and 20 CG-4 Wacos. The 439th later received a Distinguished Unit Citation for its work during these two days.


World War II [ edit ]

Media related to 439th Troop Carrier Group at Wikimedia Commons

Trained in the U.S. with C-47s, 1943-Jan1944. Moved to England, February–March 1944, for duty with Ninth Air Force. ΐ]

The group began operations by dropping paratroops of the 101st Airborne Division in Normandy on D-Day (6 June 1944) and releasing gliders with reinforcements on the following day. The group received a Distinguished Unit Citation and a French citation for these missions. After the Normandy invasion the group ferried supplies in the United Kingdom until the air echelon was sent to Italy in July to transport cargo to Rome and evacuate wounded personnel. The detachment dropped paratroops of the 517th Parachute Infantry Regiment along the Riviera in support of the invasion of Southern France on 15 August, and later towed gliders to provide reinforcements for these missions the group earned another citation from the French government. After the air echelon returned to England on 25 August the group resumed its cargo missions. ΐ]

After moving to France in September, the group dropped paratroops of the 82nd Airborne Division near Nijmegen and towed gliders carrying reinforcements during the airborne attack on the Netherlands. In December, it participated in the Battle of the Bulge by releasing gliders with supplies for the 101st Airborne Division near Bastogne. When the Allies made the air assault across the Rhine River in March 1945, each aircraft of the 439th towed two gliders with troops of the 17th Airborne Division and released them near Wesel. The group also hauled food, clothing, medicine, gasoline, ordnance equipment, and other supplies to the front lines and evacuated patients to rear zone hospitals. It converted from C-47s to C-46s and the 439th used the new aircraft to transport displaced persons from Germany to France and Belgium after V-E Day. ΐ]

The group returned to the U.S. during the period July–September 1945, and trained with C-46 aircraft until inactivated on 10 Jun 1946. ΐ]

Air Force Reserve [ edit ]

From June 1949, the group trained in troop carrier operations until mobilized in April 1951, its personnel being used as fillers for USAF organizations worldwide during the Korean War. ΐ]

Activated in the Reserve on 15 June 1952, the group trained in fighter-bomber operations until phased out in September 1957 when the wing adopted the Tri-Deputate organization.

On 8 January 1966 the 439th replaced the 1602d Air Transport Group at Rhein-Main AB, Germany. The group controlled assigned and attached Military Airlift Command airlift units at Rhein-Main, provided air transport and air evacuation services within and occasionally outside Europe. Earned an Air Force Outstanding Unit Award for May–June 1967 support during the Middle East crisis. ΐ]

Since 1 August 1992 the group has trained for and flown global airlift operations, transporting personnel, equipment, and supplies and participating in numerous exercises. ΐ]

The group received its first C-5M Super Galaxy on June 2, 2017. Marking the first of eight for the unit. Ώ] On September 7, 2017 the unit's last C-5A left Westover for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona for retirement. Α]


Interesting books about WWII Troop Carrier Command:

D-day briefing

Briefing prior to D-day of the 438th and 439th Glider group.

1945

91st Squadron 439 Troop Carrier Group 1945. Standing: From left to right. John Bennett, Del Summers, Bill Rankin, Fred Francher, Charlie Scott, Fred Reed, Charlie Balfour, Tom Berry. Kneeling: Gerald "Mac" MacDonald, Rufus Hill, Chuck Skidmore, Roy Sample, Ken Bowers. Photo Courtesy: Mike Skidmore


94th Troop Carrier Squadron

At 0111 Hours on 6 June 1944 (D-Day) from the 94th Squadron aircraft “Argonia,” some of the first elements of the 101st Airborne Division jumped into Normandy to help spearhead the largest airborne assault in history against Hitler's Fortress Europe.

Campaigns - 7 Battle Stars
Decorations: Distinguished Unit Citation
French Croix de Guerre with Palm
French Fourragere

Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Air & Space &bull War, World II. A significant historical date for this entry is June 6, 1944.

Location. 39° 46.822′ N, 84° 6.746′ W. Marker is in Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, in Montgomery County. Marker (Memorial #27) is in the Memorial Park of the National Museum of the United States Air Force, with museum access off Springfield Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1100 Spaatz Street, Dayton OH 45433, United States of America. Touch for directions.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 34th Bomb Group (Heavy) (a few steps from this marker) 303rd Bomb Group 'H' (a few steps from this marker) Second Schweinfurt Memorial (a few steps from this marker) Alexander P. de Seversky (a few steps from this marker) 91st Bomb Group (H) (a few steps from this marker) 10th Air Depot Group (a few steps from this marker)

43rd Bombardment Group (a few steps from this marker) 483rd Bombardment Group (H) (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

Also see . . .
1. 94th Flying Training Squadron Lineage. (Submitted on December 27, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. NMUSAF Memorial Park Diagram. (Submitted on December 27, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)


30 June 1975

30 June 1975: The last operational Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport in service with the United States Air Force, 43-49507, was retired and flown to the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

A C-47D, it is on display in the World War II Gallery, painted and marked as C-47A-80-DL 43-15213 of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group, during World War II. At the time it was withdrawn from service, 43-49507 had flown a total of 20,831 hours.

43-49507 (Douglas serial number 26768) was built at Oklahoma City as a C-47B-15-DK Skytrain. The C-47B differed from the C-47A in that it was powered by Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp S3C4-G (R-1830-90) engines. These engines were equipped with two-speed superchargers for improved high-altitude performance. Following World War II, the second speed (“high blower”) was either disabled or removed. Following this modification, the airplane was redesignated C-47D.

A group of new Douglas C-47 Skytrains. The airplane closest to the camera is C-47-DL 41-18415. (Douglas Aircraft Company)

The Douglas C-47 Skytrain is a military transport variant of the Douglas Aircraft Company DC-3 commercial airliner. It is an all-metal, twin-engine, low-wing monoplane with retractable landing gear. It was operated by a minimum flight crew of two pilots, navigator, radio operator and mechanic/load master. The airplane’s control surfaces are covered with doped-fabric. The primary differences between the civil DC-3 and military C-47 was the addition of a cargo door on the left side of the fuselage, a strengthened cargo floor, a navigator’s astrodome and provisions for glider towing.

The DC-3 made its first flight 17 December 1935, while the C-47 flew for the first time six years later, 23 December 1941.

Two Douglas C-47 Skytrains. Nearest the camera is C-47A-90-DL 43-15661. The further airplane is C-47A-65-DL 42-100550. (U.S. Air Force)

The C-47 is 64 feet, 5½ inches (19.647 meters) long with a wingspan of 95 feet (28.956 meters) and height of 17 feet (5.182 meters). The total wing area is 988.9 square feet (91.872 square meters). The angle of incidence is 2°. The wing center section is straight, but outboard of the engine nacelles there is 5º dihedral. The wings’ leading edges are swept aft 15.5°. The trailing edges have no sweep. Empty weight of the C-47D is 17,865 pounds (8,103 kilograms) and the maximum takeoff weight is 33,000 pounds (14,969 kilograms).

The C-47A was powered by two 1,829.4-cubic-inch-displacement (29.978 liter) air-cooled, supercharged R-1830-92 (Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp S1C3-G) two-row 14-cylinder radial engines with a compression ratio of 6.7:1. These were rated at 1,060 horsepower at 2,550 r.pm., up to 7,500 feet (2,286 meters), maximum continuous power, and 1,200 horsepower at 2,700 r.p.m. at Sea Level for takeoff. Each engine drives a three-bladed Hamilton Standard Hydromatic constant-speed full-feathering propeller with a diameter of 11 feet, 6 inches (3.505 meters) through a 16:9 gear reduction. The R-1830-92 is 48.19 inches (1.224 meters) long, 61.67 inches (1.566 meters) in diameter, and weighs 1,465 pounds (665 kilograms).

U.S. Army paratroopers jump from Douglas C-47-DL Skytrain 41-7805, over England, May 1944. (U.S. Air Force)

The specifications of the Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp S3C4-G (R-1830-90) installed on the C-47B and C-47D were nearly the same as the -92 engine of the C-47A. Displacement and compression ratio were identical. The engines’ diameters were the same, though the -90 was very slightly longer than the -92—1.85–2.74 inches (4.699–6.960 centimeters), depending on specific variant. Also, the -90 was heavier than the -92 by 25–30 pounds (11.34–13.61 kilograms), again, depending on the specific variant. The R-1830-90 could maintain 1,000 horsepower at 2,550 r.p.m. at 12,500 feet (3,810 meters), and 1,000 horsepower at 2,700 r.p.m. at 14,000 feet (4,267 meters), a significant increase over the -92.

The C-47D has a cruising speed of 161 knots (185 miles per hour/298 kilometers per hour) at 10,000 feet (3,048 meters), and maximum speed of 202 knots (232 miles per hour/374 kilometers per hour) at 3,500 feet (1,067 meters). Its service ceiling was 22,150 feet (6,751 meters). The Skytrain had a maximum range of 1,026 nautical miles (1,181 miles/1,900 kilometers) with full cargo.

The C-47 could carry 9,485 pounds (4,302 kilograms) of cargo, or 27 fully-equipped paratroopers. Alternatively, 24 patients on stretchers could be carried, along with two attendants.

C-47 Skytrains in Vee-of Vees formation.

On D-Day, The Sixth of June, 1944, a formation of C-47 Skytrains, nine airplanes abreast, 100 feet (30 meters) from wing tip to wing tip, 1,000 feet (305 meters) in trail, stretching for over 300 miles (483 kilometers), airdropped 13,348 paratroopers of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, United States Army, and another 7,900 men of the British Army 6th Airborne Division and the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, behind the beaches at Normandy, France.

During the Vietnam War, 53 C-47s were converted from their transport role to AC-47 Spooky gunships. These were armed with three fixed, electrically-powered General Electric GAU-2/A .30-caliber (7.62 NATO) Gatling guns firing out the left side of the fuselage. These aircraft were highly effective at providing close air support. The three Miniguns could fire a total of 12,000 rounds per minute.

Douglas AC-47D Spooky gunship, 45-0927, 4th Special Operations Squadron, Nha Trang, Republic of Vietnam, September 1968. (U.S. Air Force)

Douglas Aircraft Company built 10,174 C-47 Skytrains at its factories in Santa Monica and Long Beach, California, and at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.


439th Troop Carrier Group - History

U.S. Military Personnel that Served in WWII

Last Name Beginning With (N)

For information on any of the names listed below, submit your request to [email protected]

For information about the World War II History Center Research Database, click here.

For information about the World War II History Center, click here.

Name Unit(s)/Ship(s) Resource #

Nabours, Paul 101st Airborne Division 383

Nacelli, William USS Sterett 726

Nachowitz, Edward A. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Nadeau, Leo USS San Jacinto 628

Nadler, Philip H. F Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nagaki, Tad Office of Strategic Services 430

Nagato, Fumitake G Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team 578

Nagel, Dave 305th Bomb Group 408

Nagel, Frederick W. 423rd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division 87

Nagel, John Army Air Force 893

Nagengast, Jerome J. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nagle, Francis "Red" USS Goodhue 759

Nagy, Julius G. USS Sterett 726

Naiden, Earl Army Air Corps 579

Najomowicz, Walter J. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nakada, Henry I Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team 578

Nakano, Lane 442nd Regimental Combat Team 578

Nakelski, Nick 101st Airborne Division 893

Nalipa, Stanley 68th Bomb Squadron, 44th Bomb Group 328

Nancarrow, William T. 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nance, Ray A Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 24

Nanny, James 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Narbutas, Keistutis, J. (Casey) 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Nasea, John 101st Airborne Division 383

Nash, Cecil C Company, 70th Tank Battalion 375

Nash, Lee A Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 24

Natalle, Emile 101st Airborne Division 384

Natches, Harvey 2nd Armored Division 727

Nau, Charles E. B Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Naughton, Francis E. "Frank" HQ Company, 3rd Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Air. 482

Naulty, John B Company, 31st Tank Battalion 107

Navarre, Christopher 761st Tank Battalion 402

Nawakas, Frank US Army 506

Nawrocki, Ben B Company, 393rd Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division 197 557

Nay, H. B. Army Air Force 893

Neal, Charles 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Neal, Hugh A. 463rd Parachute Field Artillery Battalion 100

Neal, Virgil S. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Neale, John H. (Jack) 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Neale, Robert H. 23rd Fighter Group American Volunteer Group "Flying Tigers" 33 737

Neary, John A. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Neavles, Jackson 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 370 383

Nederveld, Leonard E Company, 27th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division 185

Nedza, Walter C Company, 771st Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Neel, Leon B Company, 823rd Tank Destroyer Battalion 382

Neel, Malcolm A Battery, 80th Anti-Aircraft Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Neese, Alonzo A. 592nd Field Artillery Battalion 557

Neff, John Junior Great Lakes Naval Hospital LST 730 888

Neidner, William 10th Mountain Division 785

Neill, Martin N. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Neilsen, Frederick C. H Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Neilson, W. R. B Company, 82nd Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Armored Division 831 727

Neiman, Bob 1st Marine Tank Battalion 156

Nein, E. L. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Neinfeldt, Ernest 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nelson, Alfred H. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nelson, Ardean J. USS Sterett 726

Nelson, Clarence 907th Glider Field Artillery Battalion 383

Nelson, F. L. USS Sterett 726

Nelson, Frances U. S. Army Nurse 893

Nelson, Frank General Wainwright's Staff 398

Nelson, Fred W. U. S. Army Air Force 893

Nelson, George USS Sterett 726

Nelson, George P. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nelson, Gustin M. 112th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 557

Nelson, Harl Coplin USS Arizona 486

Nelson, Ingwald USS North Carolina 810

Nelson, James 761st Tank Battalion 402

Nelson, Kenneth 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division 358

Nelson, Lindsey 9th Infantry Division 419

Nelson, Milton C Company, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nelson, Norman A. 101st Airborne Division 383

Nelson, R. S. U.S. Navy Pilot 754

Nelson, Richard E. 1st Battalion, 67th Armored Regiment, 2nd Armored Division 727

Nelson, Richard H. 509th Composite Group 296

Nelson, Robert Alexander USS North Carolina 810

Nelson, Robert W. 500th Bomb Group, 73rd Bomb Wing 599

Nelson, Robert W. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Nelson, Roy C Company, 40th Tank Battalion, 7th Armored Division 107

Nelson, Swede 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Nelson, Trent 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nelson, Virgil A. USS Sterett 726

Nemec, G. B. Captain, U.S. Army 920

Nemeth, Bill G Company, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nero, D.S. 19th Engineer Regiment 594

Nerone, Anthony M. 314th Troop Carrier Group 893

Nervy Private, 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nesbitt, Robert W. 38th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 583

Nespor, Robert US Army Air Force 737

Netscavge, Joe 9th Infantry Division 419

Netterblad, A. T. 3rd Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop 831

Neu, Robert D. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Neuberger, William H. D Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Neville, Bob Stars and Stripes 419

Nevins, George 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 403

Nevins, Hugh Army Air Force 893

Nevious, George 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 403

New, Charles E. (Eric) 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Newbrough, James C Company, 161st Infantry Regiment 18

Newbrough, Robert D Company, 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division 557

Newcomb, Richard USS Sterett 726

Newcomer, James H. G Company, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Newell, Robert O. 318th Squadron, 325th Fighter Group 104

Newell, Tom 3rd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 844

Newhart, Robert B. E Company, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Newkirk, John American Volunteer Group "Flying Tigers" 737

Newman, Aubrey S. "Red" 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division 150

Newman, William 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Niader, William Headquarters and Service Company, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Div. 156

Nice, Orville G. USS Sterett 726

Nichol, Bromfield US Navy 737

Nichols, Bromfield B. Scouting Squadron Six, USS Enterprise 361

Nichols, Forrest J. B Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nichols, Mickey 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nichols, Robert E Company, 540th Combat Engineer Regiment 456

Nichols, Wallace J. 745th Tank Battalion 375

Nickerson, Edward G Company, 85th Mountain Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division 785

Nickirk, Charles 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nickrent, Roy 101st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nielsen, Chase J. Doolittle's Raiders 737

Nieman, Millard USS North Carolina 810

Niepling, Larry F Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 38

Nightingale, Lyle 376th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nikkel, Donald F Company, 112th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division 557

Niland, Robert "The Beast" D Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Niland, Thomas J. 2nd Battalion, 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nimitz, Chester W. Central Pacific Command Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet 151 155 156 280 293 300 302 314

356 374 379 401 402 447 479 497

521 565 575 584 605 726 737 753

Nipple, Forest F Company, 325th Glider Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nishimoto, Joe G Company, 442nd Regimental Combat Team 578

Nitz H Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nix, Bethel C Company, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nixon, Jacque M. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nixon, Lewis 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 370

Niziolek, Anthony, Jr. USS Sterett 726

Noble, Gerry 2nd Armored Division 727

Nochta, John E. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Noehre, Ernest J. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Noel, Phil 558th Anti-aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion 501

Noel, William B. 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nokleby, Harvey 10th Mountain Division 785

Nolan, Roy 82nd Airborne Division 893

Noody, Robert j. 101st Airborne Division 893

Norcross, David N. USS Sterett 726

Noreene, James W. 101st Airborne Division 383

Norfleet, William D Company, 116th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division 403

Norman, John R. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Norman, R.S. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Normand, G.G.Y. 305th Bomb Group 737

Normandie, Arthur USS Sterett 726

Norris 2nd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 375

Norris, Benjamin VMSB-241 300 753

Norris, Cleo 142nd Signal Company, 2nd Armored Division 727

Norris, Frank 345th Field Artillery Battalion, 90th Infantry Division 482

Norris, Glen 91st Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 831

Norris, Jack K. F Company, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division 557

Norris, Sam 13th Squadron, 3rd Bomb Group, Fifth Air Force 173

North Jr., William G. 32nd Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 557

Northcraft, Herbert L. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Northrup, Arthur J. 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Northrup, Jacob H Company, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Norton, Charles R. 101st Airborne Division 383

Norton, G. H. 3rd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron 914

Norton, John "Jack" H Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 316 482 893

Norton, Leroy I Company, 161st Infantry Regiment 18

Norwood, Thomas A. A Company, 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division 383

Notestein, James US Army, Italy 292

Novak, Joe I Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Novak, Walter "Romeo" A Company, 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division 149

Nowakowski, Felix D. US Army 62

Nowell, Henry 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Noyes, Leigh Rear Admiral, US Navy 584 754

Noyes, Nelson C Company, 2nd Ranger Battalion 384

Nugent, Francis E. 439th Troop Carrier Group 893

Nunan, Denis 10th Mountain Division 785

Nunan, Paul D. D Company, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division 482

Nungesser, William L. 168th Engineer Combat Battalion 557

Nunnelly, George C Company, 1st Ranger Battalion 839

Nutto, William 4th Armored Division 432

Nyce, Harry C. USS Sterett 726

Nye, Walter F. F Company, 1st Ranger Battalion 243 839

Nyeste, Joseph HQ Company, 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383

Nyste, Joseph HQ Company, 327th Glider Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division 383


Watch the video: RAF UPOTTERY USAAF 439th Troop carrier group WW2