John Willis DE-1027 - History

John Willis DE-1027 - History

John Willis

John Harlan Willis was born 10 June 1921 in Columbia, Tenn. Upon graduation from high school in 1940 he entered the Navy and received training as a hospital corpsman. He served at naval hospitals at Paris Island, S.C., Jacksonville, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. In 1943 he joined the Field Medical School Battalion and the following year reported for duty at the Fleet Marine Force, Oceanside, Calif. In December 1944 he departed with the invasion force bound for Iwo Jima as Platoon Corpsman for the 3d Battalion, 27th Regiment, 5th Marine Division. While administering first aid to wounded Marines, engaged in "furious close-in fighting" at Hill 362 on 28 February 1945, Willis was struck by shrapnel and ordered to retire to a battle aid station. Returning shortly to his company, he advanced to the "extreme front lines under mortar and sniper fire" during a "savage hand-to-hand enemy counterattack." While administering blood plasma to a wounded Marine, Willis hurled back at the enemy eight grenades which landed near his patient. The ninth one exploded in his hand and killed him instantly. "By his great personal valor in saving others at the sacrifice of his own life, he inspired his companions, although terrifically outnumbered, to launch a fiercely determined attack and repulse the enemy force." "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty," Pharmacist's Mate First Class John Harlan Willis was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously.

(DE-1027: dp. 1,270; 1. 314'6"; b. 36'9"; dr. 9'1"; s. 25 k.; cpl. 170; a. 6 3", 1 dct., 6 dcp., 1 ASW rkt.; cl. Dealey)

John Willis (DE-1027) was launched by the New York Shipbuilding Co. of Camden, N.J., 4 February 1956; sponsored by Mrs. Winfrey M. Duke, widow of John Willis; and commissioned at Philadelphia Naval Yard 21 February 1957, Lt. Comdr. H. 0. Anson, Jr., in command.

John Willis reported to Newport, R.I., 7 April for duty with the Atlantic Fleet. Following 2 months of shakedown along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean, she departed Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 7 June for a 5-week cruise to Northern Europe that carried her to Dutch, German, and Danish ports on the North and Baltic Seas. Upon her return to Newport 14 July, she commenced 10 months of ASW exercises along the Atlantic coast in preparation for deployment with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

She steamed from Newport 12 May 1958 for the Mediterranean; and following her arrival at Gibraltar 21 May, she sailed with units of the 6th Fleet to participate in joint NATO antisubmarine exercises in the Eastern Mediterranean. The pro-Western government of Iraq fell to Arab nationalists 14 July, and on the 15th President Chamoun of Lebanon requested U.S. aid to thwart the possible overthrow of his government. In response President Eisenhower dispatched the 6th Fleet to Lebanon and ordered Marines to land at Beirut to protect "Lebanon's territorial integrity and independence." John Willis joined the Lebanon Patrol 18 July and for the next 2 months remained on intermittent patrol. As the Middle East crisis eased in September, John Willis departed the Eastern Mediterranean 14 September and sailed for the United States, putting into Newport 7 October.

On 29 November she entered the New York Shipyard to receive an experimental model of the Variable Depth Sonar (VDS) and thus became the first of the destroyer escorts to employ this latest development in ASW equipment. Resuming her operations 4 February 1959, she spent the remainder of 1959 and the early part of 1960 testing and evaluating the new equipment and conducting ASW exercises along the Atlantic coast from Newfoundland to Key West. Following a demonstration of the VDS for the Second Inter-American Naval Conference at Key West in late May, John Willis joined the Atlantic Fleet for 4 months of American and NATO Operations "Sea Spray" and "Sword Thrust," in the North Atlantic. She retired to Plymouth, England, 2 October but on the 10th rejoined the NATO forces for Exercise "Pipe Down."

John Willis returned to Newport 20 October and resumed coastal operations. On 8 May 1961 she! sailed to Guantanamo Bay for patrol duty along the Windward Passage of the Caribbean. Following the assassination of Dominican Dictator Trujillo 27 May, she conducted patrols along the coast of the Dominican Republic. She departed the Caribbean 25 June and sailed via Key West for homeport. She returned to the Caribbean 2 December after participating in the recovery of the Project Mercury MA-5 spacecraft, which on 29 November twice orbited the earth with a chimpanzee, Enos, on board.

In response to a request for aid by President Balaguer, who feared that supporters of slain Dictator Trujillo would topple the democratic government in the Dominican Republic, President Kennedy ordered units of the Atlantic Fleet into the area to illustrate America's support for the established government. John Willis sailed to the Dominican Republic 2 December and commenced 7 days of patrol duty after which she returned to Newport to prepare for another cruise to Northern Europe.

She sailed for Portsmouth, England, 8 January 1962 and reached the English coast 19 January. While sailing the North Sea on the 23d enroute to Horton, Norway, she assisted units of the British Navy during search and rescue operations for stricken Norwegian ship, Eystein. John Willis put into Horton 24 January and for 3 weeks sailed to several Norwegian ports while officers and engineers of the Norwegian Navy studied the construction details and operational characteristics of this Dealey class DE, which had been selected as the prototype for five new Norwegian warships. Upon completion of her Norwegian cruise, she sailed 15 February for the United States and arrived Newport 3 March.

John Willis resumed ASW and convoy escort exercises out of Newport and during August received additional ASW equipment. Following 4 months of extensive overhaul, she steamed to the Caribbean 1 March 1963 for an operational readiness inspection. After returning to Newport 8 April, she commenced operations 15 April with a NATO force of 30 ships, engaged in ASW Exercise, "New Broom Eleven," in the North Atlantic. After her return to Newport 2:5 April, she began 6 months of intermittent training in preparation for an Atlantic Fleet amphibious Exercise, "Phibaswex," scheduled for December. During this training period she conducted convoy escort and ASW maneuvers from Narragansett Bay to Guantanamo Bay; she attended the ASW Tactical School at Norfolk; and she served as a training ship at the Fleet Sonar School at Key West. While engaging in maneuvers designed to detect and destroy nuclear submarines, John Willis provided search and rescue assistance 23 September for a MATS plane, which was lost in the North Atlantic on a flight from Dover, Del., to the Azores.

John Willis steamed from Newport 2 December with Escort Squadron 10 and joined Task Force 180 for amphibious exercise at Vieques in the West Indies. During this exercise she conducted barrier patrols and practiced the latest ASW techniques against nuclear and conventional submarines. On the 17th she was released from the completed exercise and she returned to Newport.

For the next 3 years John Willis continued to operate along the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean while taking part in squadron exercises and serving as school ship at Key West. During the latter half of 1964 and 1965 she participated in UNITAS V and UN71TAS VI and made two cruises along the coasts of South America as part of the U.S. sponsored "People-to-People" Program. Between January and June 1966 she underwent extensive overhaul at Boston where she received DASH capabilities and communications alterations; thence she resumed refresher and readiness training out of Newport. Assigned to Escort Squadron 8, she deployed to European water 29 May 1967. After arriving off the Norwegian coast early in June, she operated along the coast of Western Europe during the next mouth before sailing to join the ever ready and powerful ships of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

The USS John Willia is part of the Nine Dealeys Class ships that were based in Newport Rhode Island from 1954 through 1973. You can find more information about the this and other Dealey ships on the Newport Dealeys website.Click Here!
There will be a reunion for the Newport Dealey ships on Oct 20-23, 2005 in Jacksonville, FL.
Please Contact:
Charles Holzschuh
14396-A Canalview Dr,
Delray Beach,FL 33484
Phone 561-499-2818.
Email:[email protected]


John Willis DE-1027 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS JOHN WILLIS
(DE-1027)

The DEALEY-class destroyer escort JOHN WILLIS (DE-1027) was launched by the New York Shipbuilding Company of Camden, New Jersey, on 4 February 1956 and was commissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Yard on 21 February 1957. Following shakedown, she operated out of Newport, Rhode Island. That June, she took her first transatlantic cruise visiting ports on the North and Baltic Seas. In May 1958 she was bound for the Mediterranean, where, by mid July, the Middle East was in turmoil. The pro‑Western government of Iraq fell to Arab nationalists on 14 July and the next day, President Chamoun of Lebanon requested U.S. aid to thwart the possible overthrow of his government. In response, President Eisenhower dispatched the Sixth Fleet to Lebanon and ordered Marines to land at Beirut to protect Lebanon's territorial integrity and independence. The WILLIS operated intermittently with the Lebanon Patrol for the next two months. With an easing of the crisis in September, the WILLIS headed for home.

In November, she entered the New York Shipyard to receive an experimental model of the Variable Depth Sonar (VDS), becoming the first destroyer escort to employ this latest ASW equipment. Subsequent operations in 1959 and 1960 involved testing and evaluating the new equipment, conducting ASW exercises along the Atlantic coast, and four months of American and NATO operations in the North Atlantic. She returned to Newport in October 1960.

Routine operations took her into May 1961, when she began patrol duty along the Windward Passage of the Caribbean. Her duties were intensified following the assassination of Dominican Dictator Trujillo on 27 May, and she conducted patrols along the the Dominican coast until her return home in late June. That fall, she participated in the recovery of the Project Mercury MA𔂯 spacecraft, which on 29 November took the chimpanzee Enos around the earth twice.

Trouble in the Dominican Republic again took her back to that area in December to patrol with the fleet in support of the government of President Balaguer. She began 1962 with another cruise to Northern Europe. While sailing the North Sea on 23 January en route to Norway, she assisted units of the British navy during search and rescue operations for the Norwegian ship, EYSTEIN. The WILLIS subsequently visited several Norwegian ports in order for officers and engineers of the Norwegian navy to study the construction and operational characteristics of the DEALEY class DE, which had been selected as the prototype for five new Norwegian warships. She left Norway for the states in mid February 1963.

The WILLIS resumed ASW and convoy escort exercises out of Newport and during August received additional ASW equipment. Following an overhaul and NATO operations in the North Atlantic, she underwent extensive training, which included convoy escort and ASW maneuvers along the East Coast. She also attended the ASW Tactical School at Norfolk and served as a training ship at the Fleet Sonar School at Key West. During maneuvers in September to detect and destroy nuclear submarines, the WILLIS provided search and rescue assistance for a MATS plane, lost on a flight from Dover, Delaware to the Azores.

In early December 1963, she steamed from Newport with Escort Squadron 10 for amphibious exercise at Vieques in the West Indies. During this exercise, she conducted barrier patrols and practiced the latest ASW techniques against nuclear and conventional submarines before returning to Newport.

From The Tin Can Sailor, October 2009


Copyright 2009 Tin Can Sailors.
All rights reserved.
This article may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from
Tin Can Sailors.


Contents

John Willis was launched by the New York Shipbuilding Company of Camden, New Jersey on 4 February 1956, and was sponsored by Mrs. Winfrey M. Duke, widow of John Willis. She was commissioned at Philadelphia Naval Yard on 21 February 1957, Lt. Comdr. H. O. Anson, Jr., in command. She was named for John Harlan Willis, a navy hospital corpsman who at Iwo Jima was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously.

1950s [ edit ]

John Willis reported to Newport, Rhode Island, 7 April for duty with the Atlantic Fleet. Following two months of shakedown along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean, she departed Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 7 June for a five-week cruise to Northern Europe that carried her to Dutch, German, and Danish ports on the North and Baltic Seas. Upon her return to Newport 14 July, the destroyer escort commenced 10 months of ASW exercises along the Atlantic coast in preparation for deployment with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

She steamed from Newport on 12 May 1958, for the Mediterranean and following her arrival at Gibraltar on 21 May, the warship sailed with units of the 6th Fleet to participate in joint North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) antisubmarine exercises in the Eastern Mediterranean. The pro-Western government of Iraq fell to Arab nationalists on 14 July, and on 15 July President Chamoun of Lebanon requested U.S. aid to thwart the possible overthrow of his government. In response President Dwight D. Eisenhower dispatched the 6th Fleet to Lebanon and ordered Marines to land at Beirut to protect "Lebanon's territorial integrity and independence." John Willis joined the Lebanon Patrol on 18 July and for the next two months remained on intermittent patrol. As the Middle East crisis eased in September, John Willis departed the Eastern Mediterranean on 14 September, and sailed for the United States, putting into Newport on 7 October. Ώ]

1960s [ edit ]

On 29 November she entered the New York Shipyard to receive an experimental model of the Variable Depth Sonar (VDS) and thus became the first of the destroyer escorts to employ this latest development in ASW equipment. Resuming her operations 4 February 1959, she spent the remainder of 1959 and the early part of 1960 testing and evaluating the new equipment and conducting ASW exercises along the Atlantic coast from Newfoundland to Key West. Following a demonstration of the VDS for the Second Inter-American Naval Conference at Key West in late May, John Willis joined the Atlantic Fleet for four months of American and NATO Operations "Sea Spray" and "Sword Thrust," in the North Atlantic. She retired to Plymouth, England, 2 October but on the 10th rejoined the NATO forces for Exercise "Pipe Down."

John Willis returned to Newport 20 October, and resumed coastal operations. On 8 May 1961 she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for patrol duty along the Windward Passage of the Caribbean. Following the assassination of Dominican Dictator Trujillo on 27 May, the warship conducted patrols along the coast of the Dominican Republic. She departed the Caribbean 25 June and sailed via Key West for homeport. The destroyer escort returned to the Caribbean on 2 December after participating in the recovery of the Project Mercury MA-5 spacecraft, which on 29 November, twice orbited the earth with a chimpanzee, Enos, on board.

In response to a request for aid by President Balaguer, who feared that supporters of slain Dictator Trujillo would topple the democratic government in the Dominican Republic, President John F. Kennedy ordered units of the Atlantic Fleet into the area to illustrate America's support for the established government. John Willis sailed to the Dominican Republic on 2 December and commenced seven days of patrol duty after which she returned to Newport to prepare for another cruise to Northern Europe.

She sailed for Portsmouth, England on 8 January 1962, and reached the English coast 19 January. While sailing the North Sea on 23 January en route to Horton, Norway, she assisted units of the British Navy during search and rescue operations for stricken Norwegian ship, Eystein. John Willis put into Horton on 24 January and for three weeks sailed to several Norwegian ports while officers and engineers of the Royal Norwegian Navy studied the construction details and operational characteristics of this Dealey-class destroyer escort, which had been selected as the prototype for five new Norwegian warships. Upon completion of her Norwegian cruise, the warship sailed on 15 February for the United States and arrived Newport on 3 March.

John Willis resumed ASW and convoy escort exercises out of Newport and during August received additional ASW equipment. Following 4 months of extensive overhaul, she steamed to the Caribbean on 1 March 1963, for an operational readiness inspection. After returning to Newport on 8 April, she commenced operations on 15 April with a NATO force of 30 ships, engaged in ASW Exercise, "New Broom Eleven," in the North Atlantic. After her return to Newport on 25 April, she began 6 months of intermittent training in preparation for an Atlantic Fleet amphibious Exercise, "Phibaswex," scheduled for December. During this training period she conducted convoy escort and ASW maneuvers from Narragansett Bay to Guantanamo Bay she attended the ASW Tactical School at Norfolk and she served as a training ship at the Fleet Sonar School at Key West. While engaging in maneuvers designed to detect and destroy nuclear submarines, John Willis provided search and rescue assistance 23 September for a MATS plane, which was lost in the North Atlantic on a flight from Dover, Delaware, to the Azores.

John Willis steamed from Newport on 2 December with Escort Squadron 10 and joined Task Force 180 for amphibious exercise at Vieques in the West Indies. During this exercise she conducted barrier patrols and practiced the latest ASW techniques against nuclear and conventional submarines. On 17 December she was released from the completed exercise and she returned to Newport.

For the next three years John Willis continued to operate along the Atlantic Coast and in the Caribbean while taking part in squadron exercises and serving as school ship at Key West. During the latter half of 1964 and 1965 she participated in UNITAS V and UNITAS VI and made two cruises along the coasts of South America as part of the U.S. sponsored "People-to-People" Program. Between January and June 1966 she underwent extensive overhaul at Boston, Massachusetts where she received DASH capabilities and communications alterations: thence she resumed refresher and readiness training out of Newport. Assigned to Escort Squadron 8, she deployed to European waters on 29 May 1967. After arriving off the Norwegian coast early in June, she operated along the coast of Western Europe during the next month before sailing to join the ever ready and powerful ships of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

In 1968 John Willis returned to the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean to escort the aircraft carrier Essex. The destroyer escort followed Essex to the North Atlantic and returned to Newport in June 1968. During that cruise John Willis visited France, Italy, Belgium, England, Norway, Northern Ireland, and Malta.


John Willis

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Platoon Corpsman serving with the 3d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, during operations against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 28 February 1945. Constantly imperiled by artillery and mortar fire from strong and mutually supporting pillboxes and caves studding Hill 362 in the enemy's cross-island defenses, Willis resolutely administered first aid to the many marines wounded during the furious close-in fighting until he himself was struck by shrapnel and was ordered back to the battle-aid station. Without waiting for official medical release, he quickly returned to his company and, during a savage hand-to-hand enemy counterattack, daringly advanced to the extreme frontlines under mortar and sniper fire to aid a marine lying wounded in a shellhole. Completely unmindful of his own danger as the Japanese intensified their attack, Willis calmly continued to administer blood plasma to his patient, promptly returning the first hostile grenade which landed in the shell-hole while he was working and hurling back 7 more in quick succession before the ninth exploded in his hand and instantly killed him. By his great personal valor in saving others at the sacrifice of his own life, he inspired his companions, although terrifically outnumbered, to launch a fiercely determined attack and repulse the enemy force. His exceptional fortitude and courage in the performance of duty reflect the highest credit upon Willis and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. [1]

John Willis is the namesake of the destroyer escort ship USS John Willis (DE-1027) which was named in his honor. [2]


Sources

1. US Census, 1930. Gives fathers name as A L Willis Jr. Gives grandfathers name as A L Willis Sr., grandfather is living with them. Gives mothers name.

2. US Census, 1940. Gives Fathers name as John Willis.

3. US Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1958. Gives rank and units from 1 Jan 1944 to 30 Jan 1945.

4. Naval Historical Center. Gives biography and citation of John H. Willis.

5. Marine Corps University, History Division (Who's who in the Marine Corps). Gives biography and picture of John H. Willis.

6. Hawaii Reporter article written by Duane A. Vachon, PH.D. dated July 28, 2013. Gives biography and picture of Winfrey receiving John's medal.

7. Find a Grave Memorial #7834341. Gives full name, date of birth, date of death and interment location.

8. US Headstone Application for Military Veterans, 1925-1963. Gives name, date of birth, date of death, rank, branch of service, serial number, name of cemetery and shows signature of father (A L Willis Jr).

9. Find a Grave Memorial #119102931. Winfrey Alberta Morel Willis. Gives biography of Winfrey.


John Willis DE-1027 - History

Willis was born June 10, 1921, in Columbia, TN, graduated from Columbia High School and enlisted in November 1940. After receiving several promotions, Willis worked organizing and training units for overseas service. After being promoted to Pharmacist's Mate First Class, he joined the Training Detachment at Camp Elliott, San Diego, CA, and transferred in early 1944 to Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 27th Marine Regiment, 5th Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, CA.

As a platoon corpsman with the 3rd Battalion, he participated in the Battle of Iwo Jima. On February 28, 1945, he was wounded while aiding injured Marines near Japanese-held Hill 362. He was ordered back to the battle-aid station but disregarded his injuries and returned to the battle to resume aid to the injured. He was helping a wounded Marine when the enemy attacked with hand grenades. Willis threw eight grenades back at the enemy, but was killed when one exploded in his hand. For his actions during the battle, Willis was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Willis was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Columbia. The destroyer escort USS John Willis (DE-1027) bears his name. A barracks at the now-closed Naval Hospital in Millington, TN was named Willis Hall. Now part of the University of Memphis' Millington Center it retains the name Willis Hall.

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Platoon Corpsman serving with the 3d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, during operations against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, February 28, 1945. Constantly imperiled by artillery and mortar fire from strong and mutually supporting pillboxes and caves studding Hill 362 in the enemy's cross-island defenses, Willis resolutely administered first aid to the many marines wounded during the furious close-in fighting until he himself was struck by shrapnel and was ordered back to the battle-aid station. Without waiting for official medical release, he quickly returned to his company and, during a savage hand-to-hand enemy counterattack, daringly advanced to the extreme frontlines under mortar and sniper fire to aid a marine Iying wounded in a shellhole. Completely unmindful of his own danger as the Japanese intensified their attack, Willis calmly continued to administer blood plasma to his patient, promptly returning the first hostile grenade which landed in the shell-hole while he was working and hurling back 7 more in quick succession before the ninth one exploded in his hand and instantly killed him. By his great personal valor in saving others at the sacrifice of his own life, he inspired his companions, although terrifically outnumbered, to launch a fiercely determined attack and repulse the enemy force. His exceptional fortitude and courage in the performance of duty reflect the highest credit upon Willis and the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

The Medals

Learn about the medals, their symbolism, design and storied history. Go behind the scenes and learn how they are manufactured or explore their place in culture.


Contents

John Willis reported to Newport, R.I., 7 April for duty with the Atlantic Fleet. Following two months of shakedown along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean, she departed Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 7 June for a five-week cruise to Northern Europe that carried her to Dutch, German, and Danish ports on the North and Baltic Seas. Upon her return to Newport 14 July, she commenced 10 months of ASW exercises along the Atlantic coast in preparation for deployment with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean.

She steamed from Newport 12 May 1958, for the Mediterranean and following her arrival at Gibraltar 21 May, she sailed with units of the 6th Fleet to participate in joint North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) antisubmarine exercises in the Eastern Mediterranean. The pro-Western government of Iraq fell to Arab nationalists 14 July, and on the 15th President Chamoun of Lebanon requested U.S. aid to thwart the possible overthrow of his government. In response President Dwight D. Eisenhower dispatched the 6th Fleet to Lebanon and ordered Marines to land at Beirut to protect "Lebanon's territorial integrity and independence." John Willis joined the Lebanon Patrol 18 July and for the next two months remained on intermittent patrol. As the Middle East crisis eased in September, John Willis departed the Eastern Mediterranean 14 September, and sailed for the United States, putting into Newport 7 October. Ώ]


Grand opening of Charles H. Coolidge National Medal of Honor Heritage Center

When: 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 22 opens for self-guided tours at 1 p.m. and tickets are required, www.mohhc.org/tickets.

Where: 2 W. Aquarium Way, Suite 104

Admission: Free to the grand opening tours $9.95-$13.95.

What: 19,000-square-foot museum featuring 14 permanent displays, life-size dioramas and interactive exhibits

Regular hours: Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, 1-6 p.m.

Contact: mohhc.org or 423-877-2525

Good to know: Those attending the grand opening are advised to arrive early to see the Medal of Honor procession before the event begins at 10 a.m. (Heritage Center members receive priority seating.) Organizers expect a large turnout during the opening weekend, so tour tickets should be reserved in advance. Tours begin at 1 p.m. that day.

Fifty-two medals have been awarded for acts of valor that occurred in and around Chattanooga, including one to Mary Edwards Walker, the only female recipient.

"The Medal of Honor is a Chattanooga story," Hardison says.

Throughout the center, interviews with various honorees will play on rotation. Scholars have analyzed these interviews and found that honorees share six characteristics: patriotism, integrity, courage, citizenship, sacrifice and commitment. These characteristics drive the center's layout, says Hardison, with exhibits detailing each.

For example, the center displays a miniature Hacksaw Ridge with Desmond Doss descending in a scene from his heroic rescue of 75 wounded soldiers a reimagined French forest where Charles Coolidge and a band of new recruits fought off Germans who far outmatched them and a model of paratrooper Paul B. Huff jumping down from the sky on a reconnaissance mission during which he singlehandedly wiped out several German nests.

Additional Tennessee honorees include an African American slave turned Buffalo Soldier, a Navy corpsman who returned eight live grenades while caring for his patient, and a Cleveland, Tennessee, native who destroyed a German machine gun nest. Here are their stories &mdash some of those lesser-known, but no less valiant.


In continuing reportage from Steve Munoz: “On Sunday, July 12th, 1964, my family sailed out of Paerdegat Basin in Jamaica Bay on the Evelyn Mae (below)

and arrived at the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, still under construction and not to be opened until late November [1964].

Throughout that afternoon we drifted and steadily rolled in a southeast wind as sailing ships from around the world came up Ambrose Channel.”

Below, behold an anchored Statsraad Lehmkuhl, currently [shifting to 2019] at a dock in Fredrikstad, Norway.

Anyone have ideas on what that small boat off GF’s starboard bow might be?

Esmeralda . . . is as of July 2019 sailing off New Zealand. I love the crew hanging off the vessel, including the bowsprit, sprucing up her appearance before the parade.

Black Pearl passes Gorch Fock II. I’m told Black Pearl is currently in the Great Lakes, but I’ve never seen or heard of her there.

Juan Sebastian de Elcano . . . is a Spanish training ship launched in 1927 and whose namesake assumed leadership of Magellan’s journey from the Moluccas back to Spain. She appeared on this blog here in 2012.

Libertad fired their saluting cannons off Ft Hamilton.” Libertad has a special relationship with Wavertree, the South Street Seaport Museum ship.

“A return salute was provided by the USS Willis (DE-1027) at anchor in Gravesend Bay.

My father positioned himself with his Kodak camera, with slide film in it, against the lifeboat and mentally calculated the timing of the saluting cannon of the Argentine full rigged sailing ship Libertad and caught the flash of the cannon seen in the picture in this article. We didn’t see all of the ships enter the harbor that day, but they arrived under full sail, saluted the USS Willis and settled in at their assigned anchorage position in Gravesend Bay. There weren’t many other boats or harbor craft around that day, but in those days we were able to get up close and circle the ships after anchoring and watch the cadets secure the ship from sea.”

SS Rotterdam entering NY harbor before parade. SS Rotterdam is currently docked near the Hotel New York in . .. Rotterdam.

Note the cranes atop to western tower of the VZ Bridge it wouldn’t open for a few more months.

Would that helicopter be an HH-62A?

“Darkness was approaching and we set course back to Paerdegat Basin.” This is reprinted from NY TUGS magazine, vol2, no2 in 2009.

Many thanks, Steve. More to come.

By the way, one upcoming post features Evelyn Mae. Until then, are there any guesses on her date and place of build?


Tall Ships Challenge 2017

and they skip the sixth boro…. They were in New London some years back and here too . . ., but 2017 has gone from Charleston to Bermuda, and from there to Boston, Quebec City and Halifax . . . All these photos come compliments of Sean McQuilken…

And in order, it’s Libertad, who once long ago in 1969 called at South Street Seaport, here (and scroll) to deliver some original spars for Wavertree ,

Alexander von Humboldt II, (the oldster of this set, albeit one with a major reinvention),

When and If, who traveled the Erie Canal a few years back to get worked on on Seneca Lake, all great ships . . . Maybe one of these years, Wavertree and Peking will join in the fun . . . just maybe… And Peking has its share of adventure awaiting it this summer, with loading anticipated now early in the second week of July.

But I won’t be in Boston, because this weekend is also the mermaid’s conclave . . . and I head to the heartland and off the grid right after that . . .


Watch the video: Apollo 12 Launches - 1969. Today In History. 14 Nov 17