Thomas Lawson

Thomas Lawson

Thomas Lawson was a millionaire businessman who had made a fortune from the stock-market. Upset by the way that some of the leading business leaders had been behaving he approached John O'Hara Cosgrave, the editor of Everybody's Magazine, about him writing a series of articles on the subject. He agreed and the first of these articles appeared in July, 1904.

He wrote: "Through its workings during the last twenty years there has grown up in this country a set of colossal corporations in which unmeasured success and continued immunity from punishment have bread an insolent disregard of law, of common morality, and of public and private right, together with a grim determination to hold on to, at all hazards, the great possessions they have gulped or captured.The series ran for 20 months and gave examples of how corporations had bribed judges and politicians."

Lawson spent over $250,000 of his own money to advertise the series. He hoped that President Theodore Roosevelt would take up the case and "would shake the largest trusts and corporations until their teeth chattered and their backbones rattled like hung dried corn in a fireplace when the wind gets at it". Lawson was disappointed by the impact his articles had on public opinion and he returned to gambling on the stock-market.

Through its workings during the last twenty years there has grown up in this country a set of colossal corporations in which unmeasured success and continued immunity from punishment have bread an insolent disregard of law, of common morality, and of public and private right, together with a grim determination to hold on to, at all hazards, the great possessions they have gulped or captured. It is the same "System" which has taken from the millions of our people billions of dollars and given them over to a score or two of men with power to use and enjoy them as absolutely as through these billions had been earned dollar by dollar by the labour of their bodies and their minds.

All financial institutions which in any way are engaged in taking from the people the money that is their surplus earnings or capital, for the ostensible purpose of safe-guarding it, or putting it in use for them, or exchanging it for stocks, bonds, policies, or other paper evidences of worth, are a part of the machinery for the plundering of the people.

This sumptuous scene (Sherry's banquet-hall), this matchless luxury, were paid for out of dollars, blood and tear-soaked, wrung cent by cent from the honest toilers of the land - that these dollars meant sacrifice and abstinence, chilled bodies and scant food, fireless hearths and dreary days - all that there might be of a widow's mite or an orphan's livelihood - a fierce rage rose within me.

I have devoted three and a half years of my time and some millions of my fortune to reform work in the interests of the public. Beginning January 1st, I shall allow the public to do their own reforming, and I shall devote my time and capital exclusively to my own business of stock "gambling" in wall and State Streets - particularly Wall Street - for the purpose of recouping the millions I have donated to my public work.


Leading the Pack: Thomas Eddie Lawson Teaches History through Storytelling

Thomas Eddie Lawson is a graduate student with an applied master’s degree in teaching. However, he is not the average college student. After graduating from Virginia Tech in 1990 with an undergraduate degree in History, Thomas served in the military for quite some time.

“I joined the army fairly late,” said Thomas. “An economic recession in the early-mid 1990s caused me to join in 1994, at the age of 26.

“I joined as an M1A1 Tank armor crewman,” continued Thomas. “I was deployed to Iraq in 2009-2010 and completed 3 years in South Korea. I served 23 years before retiring as an SFC at the age of 49 in 2017,” continued Thomas.

By joining the military Thomas had learned many different things about himself that shaped him into the person he is today.

“I was an average kid that spent most of my early days playing sports and just getting by,” said Thomas. “I lacked discipline and maturity to be a truly dedicated student. It took me a few years along with the military training to mature into who I am today.”

After spending so many years in the military, Thomas was ready to experience more. One can only imagine all the things Thomas witnessed while being deployed in other countries.

“After 23 years I was ready for a change and ready to settle down,” said Thomas. “My wife and I purchased our retirement home, so I wanted a short career that would not force us to move anymore. And hiring on with the army as a contractor did not offer the security to allow us to do that.”

By retiring from the army Thomas was able to follow another path—one he has always loved. A life where he gets to spend some more time with his family contrary to when he was deployed and be able to share his passion of history with others.

“I have always enjoyed coaching and talking history with my army buddies, so I figured I should transition to doing what I really love which is teaching and coaching,” said Thomas.

An advantage that Thomas has over other history teachers and professors is the fact he lived through a few wars himself. It may not be some of the wars that are in printed textbooks since they happened many decades ago, but that is okay. It is the inside perspective he has to offer his students/ colleagues on wars that is more prevalent to them.

“I like to lecture,” said Thomas. “Teaching history is telling a story, and I really enjoy telling the stories that make us who we are both as individuals and a nation. “Most of my students seem to enjoy my lectures, just not day after day of it,” continued Thomas. “I have learned many different strategies to keep my students engaged and still get to tell my stories about history and from my travels around the world.”


Discover The History

Long before the present village of Grand Rivers came into being, before the rivers were dammed into lakes, before the discovery of the iron ore that brought prosperity and big dreams, before the earliest white settlers came into the region, there were people here. Native tribes were in this area where the rivers now known as the Tennessee and the Cumberland came closest together, and the water and the land provided a plentitude of fish and game. Nestled in the same valley as the present village the native people were here longer than anyone knows. Long before recorded history.

Read More On The History Of Grand Rivers

But in the late eighteenth century the new people began to move inexorably westward. People of Scots, Irish and German ancestry began slowly to establish farms and settlements in the land that came to be known as “between the rivers”. And starting as early as 1850 there were permanent residents in the area where Grand Rivers now exists.

But in the early 1800’s came the discovery that changed everything. Iron ore was found here and men came west to seek their fortunes. Iron brought river boats and the railroad and new settlers by the wagon load. In 1890 Thomas Lawson and others founded the Grand Rivers Company with the dream of creating a great city on the western frontier and for awhile that dream seemed tantalizingly possible. In time prosperity brought forth a city of several thousand people with fine homes and substantial commercial structures. But fortune did not smile for long on this new Jerusalem. By 1920 the iron industry had played out, Mr. Lawson had moved on, and so had most of the others.

For several decades the town slowly declined and most of the once grand buildings were lost to fire or demolition. Then came the Great Depression, President Roosevelt and his team, and new government programs including the Tennessee Valley Authority. Dams were built along the Tennessee River culminating with the construction of Kentucky Dam which impounded the Tennessee into Kentucky Lake and brought flood control, a new prosperity, a new vision and profound changes to a region languishing in poverty. Hydroelectric power brought cheap electricity and industry to an area which until then had little or none of either.

But the new body of water brought something else, something perhaps not fully anticipated. The creation of Kentucky Lake in 1945 brought an entirely new industry to the region: recreational tourism. Resorts and marinas sprouted along the lake shores. Where fishing skiffs, john boats and rafts once plied the rivers, visitors to the lake now brought and bought sailing craft and cabin cruisers.

And the boom in river transportation and water recreation ultimately led to the construction of Barkley Dam on the Cumberland River which made the narrow and winding Cumberland more easily navigable. This second lake also allowed the creation of a great National Recreation Area – albeit at much personal sacrifice and cost to the people whose families had lived there for generations. The land between the rivers had become the Land Between the Lakes and the village of Grand Rivers recreated itself as a destination for those wishing to “go to the lakes”.


Lawson E. Thomas, the first Black judge in the South since reconstruction, Part 3

Lawson E. Thomas is more than just a name in a courthouse. Lawson was the first Black judge in the South since Reconstruction and an outstanding leader in the civil rights movement.

Lawson took the bench after being appointed by the city commission in May 1950. He was nominated by Robert. L Floyd, a City of Miami commissioner, to be a municipal judge at the Negro Municipal court.

“Judge Lawson took the reins of justice in the Black community and stood for them,” said Marvin Dunn, a retired professor and historian of the Miami Black community.

According to an article in The Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida , Thomas fought for Blacks to have the right to serve on local juries and with this action, helped reinforce the promise of the United States Constitution that all defendants have the right to be tried by their peers.

In 1937, Lawson made his first appearance in Miami’s municipal court, where he presented his first case, becoming the first Black attorney to present a case there.

Lawson was threatened by a bailiff with being thrown out of the sixth-floor window if he didn’t sit with the rest of the Black people.

“We can take inspiration from his courage and his wiliness to put his life on the line for those who came behind him will have a better opportunity in the legal field,” said Trelvis Randolph, president of the Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr. Bar Association.

Thomas was a civil rights activist in South Florida who filed a lawsuit that aimed to equalize the salaries of Black and white teachers in Marion and Lake Counties.

“He went against what was expected from a Black attorney,” said Randolph. “Rather than keep his head down and respect the system, he challenged it.”

In 1945, Thomas led a protest called wade-in over the lack of Black beaches in the county. After a few months, Dade County officials established a Black beach located on Virginia Key.

According to an article in The Miami Herald , The Baker’s Haulover wade-in was held long before the national civil rights movement started.

“One of his greatest achievements as a civil rights leader was the wade-in protest,” said Paul George, Miami-Dade College professor and a Miami historian.

Judge Thomas died on Sept. 14, 1989, when he was 91 years old.

In 2000, he was honored with the naming of Lawson E. Thomas Courthouse Center in Downtown.

“It was The Bar Association that made the naming of the courthouse possible,” said Sharmaynne Thomas, daughter of Lawson E. Thomas.

Lawson is remembered as a strict and honorable judge who dedicated his life to the progress of the Black people.

“My dad taught me that there was no excuse for bad behavior,” said Thomas.


Thomas Lawson's legacy lingers in Scituate

Scituate was still suffering from the devastation of the Portland Gale when Thomas Lawson came to town.

In time, he, too, would leave an indelible mark.

With Lawson’s arrival came jobs and the start of something that would change Scituate and its landscape forever.

“We were a backwater town," Robert Chessia, one of the town historical society’s trustees, said. "Then he showed up and started to build his estate."

In 1901, Lawson amassed a crew that would build his 350-acre farm in a year, an effort possible only through his unique passions and deep pockets. Over the next decade or so, he would grow his estate to 1,000 acres. He named it Dreamwold. 

While some of Dreamwold was lost to demolition or fire, many structures remain in tact even today, scattered among new buildings, foliage and roadways. Some of his most iconic contributions, including Lawson Tower, remain a town highlight more than 90 years after his death.

Lawson and his wife, Jeannie, were out for a ride one day by horse and carriage when Scituate caught Jeannie’s eye. Lawson, who loved her dearly, bought land right way, Chessia said.

Ambitious and rich, Lawson eventually built a village within another. Dreamwold had a fire station, post office, a train station, windmill, an ice house, a green house, blacksmith shop, a stable and stable hospital, a tile-lined duck pond, racetrack and a baseball field.

It cost an estimated $2 million to build the initial 350-acre estate, Chessia said. That would equate to more than $48 million today.

“He was one of the 10 wealthiest guys in the country. Money didn’t really matter,” he said.

Lawson built homes for his family members as well as his employees and animals. The property manager and superintendent of the painters both lived on Curtis Street like Lawson’s son. Minutes away on Utility Road were cottages for sheep and chickens.

And at the center of it all was his manor home.

His work had an immediate impact. Property taxes in the town dropped by almost $4 from $17.90 per $1,000, Chessia said, citing an article from 1903.

The construction he oversaw also created new opportunities for employment, local historian John Galluzzo said.

“Lawson created jobs, as he needed people to do everything from ringing the bells in his tower to mucking out the horse stalls,” he said.

He even hired a man to count his beloved elephant statues at the end of every day, for fear someone might steal them. He owned 3,000 of them, Chessia said.

Beyond Lawson Tower𠅋uilt to hide a water tower his wife thought was an eyesore—there isn’t much to signify Lawson’s legacy for the many who pass through town.

Over time, many of the cottages were transformed into modern abodes and some of his personal favorites, such as his riding academy and horse stables, were destroyed. 

But there are clues to show where Lawson left his fingerprints, Chessia said as he drove along the roads acting as a historical tour guide.

At the main gate to his estate is the Egypt Country Store, which is known locally as the “Postie” and sits near where Lawson had his post office. A neighboring building, on Lawson Road, is a private home that once was the lodge where guests would check in on their way to see Lawson. Inside was a library he stocked just for his employees.

Along this stretch, too, wasਊ horse racetrack here. It’s outline visible for passengers traveling by train on the nearby railroad tracks.

The racetrack was one of many ways Lawson drew people to town and the estate.

“In a time when tourism was dying, he brought people to town by himself,” Galluzzo said. “There's even an old story that Billy Sunday, the preacher, didn't wait for an invitation. He just hopped the fence and found his way in to talk to the man himself.”

Next to the duck pond on Lawson Road was also a blacksmith shop that was moved to Captain Pierce Road to become a private home. Then there was a hospital stable before guests would arrive at the entrance to Lawson’s manor house.

Off nearby Bossy Lane were a stallion stable, a kennel for 200 dogs, a farmhouse and a cow barn.

His main home was near Fenway Park in Boston, but Lawson had wanted a farm and deemed Scituate the perfect home for it.

𠇊 landscape architect told him he could buy a farm for a lot less money. He said anyone can buy one, I want to make one,” Chessia said, adding, “He wanted the best of everything.”

The stable and kennel are both now houses. The cow barn was torn down, and the farmhouse, built for his employees, is now divided into condominiums, Chessia said.

On Manor road, which runs between Bossy Lane and Lawson Road, Lawson had a windmill and dove cote, which both burned down, and fire station, which is now a house.

There was also The Nest, which is now a private home. When his wife grew sick, Lawson had built next door a smaller home he dubbed The Nest so she could have a simpler, quieter place to reside. She died in 1906, four years after the estate was complete, Chessia said.

𠇊t least they’re still here,” he mused of The Nest and manor house.

Like his other properties that survived, the manor house was converted for new uses over time.

At one point, it was considered for a senior center, though the idea never panned out. It was a function hall in the 1970s before it again returned to housing, this time for a new generation of Scituate residents.

Even in its current state, Lawson’s home is a local point of interest, but perhaps his two best-known legacies are a short walk away from his once front lawn.

Lawson Tower, with its bell tower and observatory, is still open to the public on special occasions, and is second only to the Scituate Lighthouse as the historical society’s most popular sites.

Lawson also gave the town its elephant fountain, a local favorite at the center of Lawson Park.

The fountain was originally a birdbath in one of his gardens, but he donated it to the town when the park was created during World War I. The design reflects Lawson’s personality: His lucky number was three and he thought elephants to be lucky, especially if their trunks are up.

The park, located off Beaver Dam Road, was originally Memorial Park and created as a home to a Civil War memorial Lawson helped put up, but residents later renamed it Lawson Park.

Among his lesser known contributions was a fence that ran for 14 miles around Lawson’s estate had been adorned with roses at each post. Some of the fence remains today.

“He helped beautify Scituate, from the tower to the common, including the Civil War and World War I memorials, down to the miles of ‘Kentucky fencing’ that surrounded his property. And who knows how many gardens in Scituate today have his roses planted in them?” Galluzzo said.

Lawson died in 1925. He is buried next to his wife below two cedar trees in Fairview Cemetery.

After years of heavy spending, there was little money left to his name, but even in his death, Lawson left his mark.

His and his wife’s gravestones are shaped like chairs. Lawson often visited his wife after she died and wanted his gravestone built to match hers.

Lawson wasn’t without controversy, and had a my-way-or-the-highway mentality that lingered even in his final days, Galluzzo said.

𠇋ut, let's face it, almost a century later, we are still talking about him and what he did in town,” he said. “We point out the estate, the tower, the elephant fountain, the gates, the reviewing stand, the ‘Postie,’ and remember that for a brief time Dreamwold was a village of Scituate unto itself, with one, irremovable mayor.”


Sources

  1. ↑ 1.01.11.21.31.4 "Lawson of Brough," (1665, August 19). Dugdale's Vis. of York, 1665. Google Books.
  2. ↑ 2.02.12.22.32.42.5 Foster, J. (1874). "Pedigree of Lawson of Brough Hall," in Pedigrees of the county families of Yorkshire, p. Archive.org. eBook. "Cramlington," in Vis. of Northumb., 1615.[1] for Isabella Killinghall, see also: Peter Townend, P. (1976). Burke's Perrage and Baronetage, 104th ed, p. 1461. London: Burke's Peerage Ltd
  • http://www.bigstepslittlesteps.com/ancestry_records.php?ID=204

Have you taken a DNA test? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.


SHEBOYGAN HISTORY

>THOMAS LAWSON, one of the well-known and highly respected citizens of Sheboygan County, who follows farming on section 23, Lyndon Township, claims England as the land of his nativity. He was born in Lincolnshire, January 4, 1829, and his parents, Robert and Hannah (Auckland) Lawson, were also natives of the same locality. The father, who was born march 29, 1804, was a dealer in coal, and also followed farming. In 1846, he came with his family to America, boarding a sailing-vessel at Liverpool, which after forty-five days dropped anchor in the harbor of New York. During the passage, however, they encountered some very severe storms. By way of Buffalo, the Erie Canal and the Great lakes, they came to Sheboygan County. This was two years before the admission of the State into the Union. The father purchased one hundred and sixty acres of wild land, upon which was a small log cabin, and began the development of a farm, upon which his son Thomas now resides. The Indians were more numerous than the white settlers, and they would often come to the Lawson home to sell buckskin and beaded articles. Mr. Lawson was a prominent and influential citizen, and served as Supervisor of his township. The Republican party ever found in him a stalwart supporter. He passed away March 25, 1877. His wife, who was born August 18, 1808, died on the 26th of August, 1892. They were laid side by side in Onion Creek Cemetery, where stands a beautiful monument sacred to their memory.

The Lawson family numbered eleven children as follows: Mrs. Flos George, who is living retired in Waldo Charles, a farmer of Waterloo County, Iowa, who is married and has two children Robert Emma, who is a school teacher and also teacher of instrumental music Abraham, a farmer of Lyndon Township Robert, a leading merchant of Waldo Thomas, of this biography Eliza, widow of James Macain Caroline, widow of James Fairweather and Mary Ann, wife of Jason Sharp, who lives retired in Sheboygan.

Thomas Lawson was a lad of sixteen when he came with his parents to Wisconsin. Since that time he has lived in Sheboygan County, and has been numbered among its leading agriculturists. He was united in marriage with Mrs. Martha (Douglas) Paddock, who was born in Monroe County, N. Y., January 14, 1823, and was there reared and educated. On the 1st of October, 1851, she married Edward R. Paddock, a native of New York, by whom she had one son and four daughters, three now living: Dora, wife of Robert Lawson, a general merchant of Waldo Emma, wife of Robert Kennedy, of Sheboygan and Cora, wife of James Kennedy, an engineer of Spokane Falls, Wash. In 1852, Mr. and Mrs. Paddock came to this county. During the late war he entered the service of his country, and died from exposure. On the 27th of November, 1865, his widow became the wife of Mr. Lawson, and their union was blessed with three sons and two daughters: Anna, wife of Jerry Brown, agent of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, at Waldo Henry T., who was educated in Waldo, and now aids in the labors of the home farm and Robert A., who is also at home.

The Lawson household is the abode of hospitality, and the latch-string ever hangs out. The members of the family rank high in social circles, and have a host of warm friends throughout the community. Mr. and Mrs. Lawson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Onion River. Their farm comprises two hundred acres of highly improved land one mile south of Waldo, and its neat and thrifty appearance indicates the enterprise and progressive spirit of the owner. He cast his first Presidential vote for John C. Fremont, and has since been a stalwart advocate of Republican principles. He has led an honorable, upright life, and his word is as good as his bond. One of the leading and representative citizens of Lyndon Township, he well deserves mention in the history of his adopted county.


Thomas Lawson - History

from the Dictionary of American Biography, 1933.

Lawson, Thomas William (Feb. 26, 1857-Feb. 8, 1925), stockbroker and author, was born in Charlestown, Mass., the son of Thomas and Anna Maria (Loring) Lawson who had emigrated from Nova Scotia a few years before. The father, a carpenter, died when young Thomas was only eight years old and at twelve the boy, unwilling to be a burden on his mother any longer, slipped away from school one day and found work as an office boy with a brokerage firm in Boston, almost across the street from the location of his own sumptuous offices in later years. Early in his career he speculated in stocks. He made a considerable “killing” in railroad shares when he was only seventeen but lost his profits a few days later in another deal.

At twenty-one he married Jeannie Augusta Goodwillie, his boyhood sweetheart, and shortly afterward became a broker on his own account. He is said to have accumulated a million dollars by the time he was thirty. He celebrated the occasion by writing a History of the Republican Party, which he published at his own expense, and of which he had four copies specially printed on satin. Despite his lack of formal education, he acquired by his own efforts an excellent command of English and a considerable degree of literary culture.He spent his life in Boston, where he not only acted as agent and promoter for New York and other financiers and corporations but speculated for himself. He loved a fight when in his prime, and few men in the stock market have had so stormy a career. He assisted the Addicks interests to wrest the control of Bay State Gas from Standard Oil in 1894, though Addicks lost it again shortly afterward.

Lawson’s ability was recognized by the Standard Oil magnates, and thereafter for several years he was their ally. For many years in the latter part of his life he was president of the Bay State Gas Company of Delaware. By 1900 he was worth at least fifty millions and had created a handsome estate, “Dreamwold,” near Boston, which cost $6,000,000. He paid a florist $30,000 for a carnation bearing Mrs. Lawson’s name. He was a lover of art, literature, and nature, and his large private office was crowded with bronzes, paintings, books, and masses of fresh flowers. These as adjuncts to the brilliant, dynamic, spectacular, faultlessly garbed but erratic personality behind the desk, rendered it unique among business offices. When Sir Thomas Lipton, the British yachtsman, challenged again for the America’s Cup in 1901, Lawson, seeing here an opportunity for both sport and publicity, built a yacht of his own, Independence, to compete in the trial heats with the New York Yacht Club’s two boats. But the Yacht Club practically barred his boat from competition, and he acquired a grudge against certain wealthy members of the club which long endured.

He had in 1897 become connected with the promotion of Amalgamated Copper, the name under which Standard Oil capitalists reorganized the great Anaconda mine and allied properties. On this stock they now made a handsome profit, with Lawson acting as their chief broker. The stock thereafter rapidly declined in price and many holders of it suffered heavy losses.

In 1902, when Lawson, with Winfield M. Thompson, published The Lawson History of The America’s Cup, the editor of Everybody’s Magazine, learning of his grievance, induced him to write the allegedly true story of Amalgamated Copper, which he did under the title of “Frenzied Finance” -one of the most sensational successes in magazine history. The entire edition of the magazine containing the first instalment was exhausted in three days. To journalistic instinct, Lawson added an easy, slashing style and a knack for colorful phrasing which made his rough-and-tumble attack on the “money kings” vastly popular, even though readers regarded him as belonging in the same category. During the course of the articles (1904-05), the writer also assailed the large insurance companies and performed a public service by bringing about the insurance investigation of 1905 but his “remedies” for the correction of stock-market gambling were not adopted. Frenzied Finance was published in book form and was followed by a novel, Friday, the Thirteenth (1907), also attacking the stock market, but this was less popular. Later books were The Remedy (1912) The High Cost of Living (1913) and The Leak (1919). The enmity aroused by his Frenzied Finance was costly to him. He lost clients and good will thereby and many serious losses were wilfully inflicted upon him by antagonists. During the last fifteen years of his life he seemed to lose his old knack for success, and his fortunes declined steadily. He lost his magnificent estate, even his automobile, and died a comparatively poor man.

[The Lawson History of the America’s Cup (1902) and The High Cost of Living (1913) contain important references to the writer’s history, and “Frenzied Finance” as it ran in Everybody’s with the supplementary department, “Lawson and his Critics,” has some interesting personal material. See also Who’s Who in America, 1934-35 Nation, Aug. 14, 1903, Dec .21, I905 Independent, May 18, 1905 Arena, Sept. 1905 the Bookman Apr. 1907 Current Lit., Mar. 1908 Outlook, Sept. 5, 1908 New Eng. Mag., Mar. 1909 Boston Herald, Boston Transcript, Feb. 9, 1925]

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Lawson History of the America's Cup by Thomas Lawson 1902 Limited Edition 274 of 300

There are 90 illustrations, 17 of which are full-page watercolors of famous America's Cup challengers in full sail. There is also a fascinating assortment of sketches, yacht plans, and race charts. This numbered book was presented to the Bay City Tribune now part of MLive media group in Bay City Michigan.

This year's 150th anniversary of America's Cup provides a unique, never again to be repeated opportunity to purchase a copy of the most famous book on the Cup, one that is considered the official and most detailed history of the first 50 years. Published originally in 1902 in a limited and numbered edition of only 3,000 copies.

Lawson History of the America's Cup is an excellent addition to your maritime book collection or home library.

Condition

This antique book is in good shape for its age with no rips or tears. Some pages are loose and unattached please note wear on the book jacket, all shown in photos.

Please use pictures as a guide. This is a highly collectible antique book and will be shipped with insurance the fastest way possible to you.


Thomas Lawson - History

Descendants of Thomas Lawesson

Generations 1-17

1. THOMAS 1 LAWESSON.

Notes for THOMAS LAWESSON:

This gentleman lived temp. King John and had issue a son.

Note: Many thanks to John Philip Lawson for providing much additional information and corrections to my Lawson Genealogy for generations above the generation of John Lawson (abt 1635 Eng - 26 Oct 1698 Eng) m Catherine Howard (1637 Eng - 1668 Eng). His Home Page may be found at http://www.rootsweb.com/

daisy/lawbar.htm

Child of THOMAS LAWESSON is:

2. i. RALPH 2 LAWESSON.

2. RALPH 2 LAWESSON (THOMAS 1 )

Was defendant in a plea of trespass 25 Henry III called Ralph fil Thomas Lawesson,

Child of RALPH LAWESSON is:

3. ROBERT 3 LAWSON (RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 )

Child of ROBERT LAWSON is:

4. THOMAS 4 LAWSON (ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 )

Thomas Laweson was of Bywell Co. Northumberland living temp. Edward II 21 Edward III.

Child of THOMAS LAWSON is:

5. JOHN 5 LAWSON (THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 )

JOHN FIL THOMAS LAWSON of Bywell, against whom William de Akrigg and Margaret his wife claimed messuage, land etc. in Sedburgh in right of the said Margaret 47 Edward III 1374 was a witness to a deed of Robert de Insula dated 41 Edward III and a juror at Corbridge 3 Richard II.

6. JOHN 6 LAWSON (JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 )

JOHN LAWSON of Bywell Co. Northumberland was witness to a deed of Walter de Tindall dated at Devilston 1374 and was Executor to his fathers’ will 8 Richard II 1386.

7. i. WILLIAM 7 LAWSON, b. Abt. 1400 d. May 27, 1480.

7. WILLIAM 7 LAWSON (JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born Abt. 1400, and died May 27, 1480. He married AGNES CRAMLINGTON 1425, daughter of WILLIAM CRAMLINGTON. She was born 1407, and died 1461.

During reign of Henry VI of England (1421-71) acquired Craulington Hall by marriage. His ancestors for several generations had owned estates in Northumberland CO at Burwell, afterwards at Allendell.

The surname Lawson is taken from 'Law' and denotes someone who is the 'son of law'. The most likely source of the name is either from the name Lawrence believed to have originated from a person who lived near a laurel tree or from the Old English word hlaw meaning a hill and therefore a person 'the son of who lived on or near the hill'.

Records indicate that the earliest use of the Lawson name was documented in the 14th century in Upper Littondale, Yorkshire, an area close to the present day villages of Litton and Arncliffe on the River Skirfare, a tributary of the River Wharfe. Surnames or 'add-on' names can generally only be traced back to this time in history when they were adopted in order to distinguish individuals of the same forename. From that time the surname was handed down from father to son and occasionally from mother to son.

It is believed that the Lawson name spread from this area to the remainder of Yorkshire and throughout several adjoining Counties in Northern England. Records also indicate that the Lawson name existed in Scotland from 14th century where it was most commonly found in Lowland Eastern Counties. In Scotland Lawson families have links with the McLaren Clan.

It is probable that more than one original source of the name exists. The Lawson name today is found commonly in all English speaking countries. There is evidence that the Lawson name was adopted from the European (mostly Scandinavian) name Larsen and similar surnames when emigration to the British Isles took place.

Children of WILLIAM LAWSON and AGNES CRAMLINGTON are:

8. i. THOMAS 8 LAWSON, d. July 02, 1489.

ii. WILIAM LAWSON.

Notes for WILIAM LAWSON:

William Lawson Esquire of Cramlington seized of half of the manor of Cramlington in right of his mother and of lands in Bywell in his own right 9 Henry VI.

iii. JOHN LAWSON.

iv. RICHARD LAWSON.

v. GEORGE LAWSON.

Notes for GEORGE LAWSON:

George Lawson of Bywell Co. Northumberland living 1458.

8. THOMAS 8 LAWSON (WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) died July 02, 1489. He married ISABELLA KILLINGHALL August 31, 1480. She was born in Middleton, St. George.

THOMAS LAWSON of Bywell, was at the battle of Agincourt with Sir John Neville, heir male to his nephew William Lawson Esq. He died 2nd July 1489 at a great age, and was buried at Cramlington having married Isabella, daughter of John Killinghall of Middleton St. George Esq. living 1490 by whom he had issue.

Child of THOMAS LAWSON and ISABELLA KILLINGHALL is:

9. ROBERT 9 LAWSON (THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 )

ROBERT LAWSON of Bywell in the Co. of Northumberland living in the time of King HenryVI, ob. 14 Edward IV in the lifetime of his father, leaving issue.

Child of ROBERT LAWSON is:

10. WILLIAM 10 LAWSON (ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) He married MISS HORSLEY.

WILLIAM LAWSON ESQUIRE of Cramlington Co. Northumberland seized in fee-tail-maleof half of the manor of Cramlington and Hamlet of Whitlaw held by the King in captite as the sixth part of one knights fee and also divers lands, etc. in Hertlaw, Morpeth, Bywell and other parts of the County of Northumberland in special fee-tail ob. 27 March 9 Henry VIII 1518. Inquisitionpost-mortem 19 June in the same year taken at Newcastle upon Tyne in the said County of Northumberland, etc. By his wife, the daughter of Richard Horsley Esq. of Thernham, he had issue

Child of WILLIAM LAWSON and MISS HORSLEY is:

11. JAMES 11 LAWSON (WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) He married ALICE BERTRAM, daughter of GEORGE BERTRAM.

Merchant-adventurer of Newcastle.

JAMES LAWSON ESQUIRE of Mele St., Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Merchant. Sheriff 1523, Mayor 1529 and 1540. On April 8 1522 purchased of William Wardle, Merchant, a house and horse-mill in the Meal Market, Newcastle. Had apprentices George Bertram 8, Henry 8, Charles Gofton 9, Henry 8, and Richard Ball 1540. Purchased from the Crown the lands etc. of the dissolved Monastery of Nesham. Patent dated 1st October (? September) 32 Henry VIII 1540.

Was the Kings farmer and collector at Nesham 33 and 34 Henry VIII . Was seized of lands etc. in Milburne and the Manor of West Matsen. Purchased the Manor of Byker 6 July 1543 and the house in which he resided in Mele St. by deed dated 3 December 35 Henry VIII. By

deed dated April 19 1544 he settles the Manor of Byker and West Matsen on his eldest son Edmund and estates in Nesham, Cockfield, Little Burdon, Dynshall etc. on his younger sons and the heirs male begotten of their bodies with remainder to his own right heirs. Died 24

February 1 Edward VI 1547, Inq. p.m. 4 February 2 Edward VI. He married Alicia, daughter of George Bertram of Westgate, Newcastle, squire, (her will is dated 14 November 1547) and left issue.

Child of JAMES LAWSON and ALICE BERTRAM is:

12. i. EDMUND 12 LAWSON, d. July 21, 1551.

12. EDMUND 12 LAWSON (JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) died July 21, 1551. He married MARGERY SWYNHOWE, daughter of RALPH SWINNHOW.

EDMUND LAWSON Esquire of Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Byker aged 20 years 2 Edward VI seized in fee-tail male of the Manors of Byker and West Matsen and lands in the counties of Northumberland and Durham. Died 21 July 1551 Inq. p.m. 6 January 5 Edward VI He married Margaret sister and heiress of John Swynhowe and daughter of Ralph Swynhowe Esquire of Swynhowe and Rock Co. Northumberland. (She re-married Robert Lawson Esquire of Rock and had issue). By her he had issue.

Children of EDMUND LAWSON and MARGERY SWYNHOWE are:

i. JAMES 13 LAWSON, b. April 1545 d. 1552.

Notes for JAMES LAWSON:

James Lawson son and heir born April 1545 aged 6 years and 8 months at the time of his father’s death. Seizes of the Manors of Byker and West Matsen etc. The King granted wardship to Richard Chetwood Esquire. Died young s.p. 17 December 4 Elizabeth.

13. ii. RALPH LAWSON, b. 1547 d. 1623.

iii. ROBERT LAWSON.

Notes for ROBERT LAWSON:

Of Scremerston Co. Durham living 1566, died s.p.

13. RALPH 13 LAWSON (EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born 1547, and died 1623. He married ELIZABETH BROUGH June 17, 1568, daughter of ROGER BROUGH. She was born Abt. 1544 in Brough, Yorkshire, England.

Knighted by James I of England July 23, 1603. James I (1565-1625)

SIR RALPH LAWSON Knight of Burgh Hall, County of York and Byker County of Northumberland, heir to his brother aged 15 years 25 February 4 Elizabeth, seized of the Manor of Byker and half of the Manor of Cramlington in his own right and of the Manor of Burgh-juxta Catteryck Co. York in right of his wife Elizabeth, daughter and sole heiress of Roger Burgh of Burgh-juxta Catteryck Esquire, marriage settlements dated 17 June 1568. Will dated 4 September 1623. Proved 9 October 1623, died same year aged 76 years.

Note: Burgh (sometimes spelled Brough) Hall is still in Catteryck in York. My cousin Patsy Jackson and her husband Jack visited Brough in April 2000 and took these pictures below:

Tapestries Showing Lawson Coats of Arms and Genealogy Charts - Tapestry 1 Tapestry 2

Notes for ELIZABETH BROUGH:

Inherited Brough Hall in Yorkshire from her father Roger Brough.

Children of RALPH LAWSON and ELIZABETH BROUGH are:

i. JANE 14 LAWSON, m. THOMAS ROKEBY b. Northan.

ii. ALICE LAWSON, m. THOMAS INGLEBY.

iii. HENRY LAWSON.

14. iv. JOHN LAWSON.

v. MARGARET LAWSON, m. THOMAS RAKELY.

15. vi. ROGER LAWSON, b. 1573 d. Abt. 1613.

14. JOHN 14 LAWSON (RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) He married SARAH ROWLAND, daughter of RICHARD ROWLAND.

All of John Lawson's sons went to America.

Children of JOHN LAWSON and SARAH ROWLAND are:

16. i. ROWLAND 15 LAWSON, d. May 03, 1661, Lancaster, VA.

ii. RICHARD LAWSON, d. Abt. 1658 m. ELIZABETH.

17. iii. EPAPHRODITUS LAWSON, b. Abt. 1600 d. 1656.

iv. CHRISTOPHER LAWSON.

15. ROGER 14 LAWSON (RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born 1573, and died Abt. 1613. He married DOROTHY CONSTABLE Abt. 1597, daughter of HENRY CONSTABLE. She was born 1580 in Yorkshire, and died March 26, 1632 in All Saints Church, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

ROGER LAWSON ESQUIRE of Heaton Co. Northumberland and the Inner Temple, Londonaged 14 in 1585, marriage settlement 10 March 1597/8. To be married before the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel next ensuing. Died in London 1613 or 1614 in his father’s lifetime.By his wife Dorothy, daughter of Sir Henry Constable, Knight, of Burton Constable Hall in Holderness Co. York who lived at St. Anthony’s, Newcastle and died 26 March, buried at All Saints Church, Newcastle 27 March 1632.

Notes for DOROTHY CONSTABLE:

After the celebration of Dorothy's marriage, it is stated that "she was conducted from Wing to Burton, in external pomp and shew like a glorious bride. Shee rested att Burton untill all Holderness came to congratulate, some as friends and allies, others as servants and vassalls, but all promiscously pretending tith to a proportion of the solmenity. From Burton shee departed towards Brough with a far larger retinue than before: But it most encreased at Leeman, a village six miles from the end of her journey, where she was forced to make a halt by Sir Ralph Lawson, who att his first approach (which was glorious to envy) with a hundred horse of his attendance, saluted her with ordinary salute of the kingdom, but after an extraordinary manner, not permitting her to alight then he took her from horse himself, imparted his benediction, which she humbly craved on her knees in the dust, and mounted her again on a snow white steed he brought for her. . "

From: Life of Mrs. Dorothy Lawson of St. Anthony, near Newcastle-upon-Tyne, by William Palmes. Published by Charles Dolman, London, 1855.

Child of ROGER LAWSON and DOROTHY CONSTABLE is:

18. i. HENRY 15 LAWSON, b. 1595 d. 1636.

16. ROWLAND 15 LAWSON (JOHN 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) died May 03, 1661 in Lancaster, VA. He married LETITIA Bef. 1637 in England.

Came to America in 1638. --- Greer, Early Virginia Emigrants, p200. Was a Justice of Lancaster County, VA (1652-1655). Will probated May 8, 1661.

Children of ROWLAND LAWSON and LETITIA are:

i. ELIZABETH 16 LAWSON.

ii. LETICIA LAWSON, m. FORTUNATUS SYDNOR, 1668.

iii. HENRY LAWSON, b. Abt. 1650 d. Bef. 1672.

iv. JOHN LAWSON, b. Abt. 1655 m. MARY KIRBY, 1680.

19. v. ROWLAND LAWSON II, b. 1645 d. 1706, Lancaster County.

vi. EPAPHRODITUS LAWSON.

vii. JOANNA LAWSON, m. LANNCELOT SOCKWELL, 1668.

viii. RICHARD LAWSON.

17. EPAPHRODITUS 15 LAWSON (JOHN 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born Abt. 1600, and died 1656. He married ELIZABETH MEDESTARD.

Notes for EPAPHRODITUS LAWSON:

Owned 6050 acres in Virginia.

Child of EPAPHRODITUS LAWSON and ELIZABETH MEDESTARD is:

i. ELIZABETH 16 LAWSON, m. ROBERT PAYNE.

18. HENRY 15 LAWSON (ROGER 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born 1595, and died 1636. He married ANNE HODGSON, daughter of ROBERT HODGSON.

HENRY LAWSON ESQUIRE of Burgh Hall successor and heir to his grandfather at whose death he was aged 21 years 9 months, was seizes of the Manor of Byker and half that of Cramlington Co. Northumberland and of Burgh juxta Catteryck Co. Yorks. pabd. 1 December

1601. Will dated 11 January 9 Charles I 1634/5. Proved 29 January 1636 buried at All Saints, Newcastle 17 December 1635. By his wife Anne third daughter of Robert Hodgson Esquire of Hebburne Co. Durham (buried at All Saints, Newcastle, 22 May 1663)

Children of HENRY LAWSON and ANNE HODGSON are:

20. i. HENRY 16 LAWSON.

ii. ROGER LAWSON.

21. iii. JOHN LAWSON, b. Abt. 1635, Naworth, Cumberland, England d. October 26, 1698.

19. ROWLAND 16 LAWSON II (ROWLAND 15 , JOHN 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born 1645, and died 1706 in Lancaster County. He married ANNA KEEN JONES, daughter of RIIS JONES.

Notes for ROWLAND LAWSON II:

Was Justice of Lancaster County, VA in 1684.

Rowland Lawson, Jr.'s will in 1706, bears a seal showing arms--a chevron between three martlets. Burke gives thc arms of Lawson, of Brough Hall, Yorkshire, and of Lawson (Baronets) of Longherstl and Cramblington Co., Northumberland, England, as--Arg, a chevron between three martlets sable.

Source - William and Mary College Quartely Historical Magazine Volume I, page 636.

Children of ROWLAND LAWSON and ANNA JONES are:

22. i. ROWLAND 17 LAWSON III, d. 1717.

ii. SARAH LAWSON, m. WILLIAM MOOR.

23. iii. HENRY LAWSON, d. 1716.

iv. HUGH LAWSON.

20. HENRY 16 LAWSON (HENRY 15 , ROGER 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) He married CATHERINE FENWICK, daughter of SIR WILLIAM FENWICK.

Child of HENRY LAWSON and CATHERINE FENWICK is:

i. ISABELLA 17 LAWSON, m. SIR JOHN SWINBURN.

21. JOHN 16 LAWSON (HENRY 15 , ROGER 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born Abt. 1635 in Naworth, Cumberland, England, and died October 26, 1698. He married CATHERINE HOWARD 1660, daughter of WILLIAM HOWARD and MARY EURE. She was born 1637, and died July 04, 1668.

Was a captain of Horse in service of Charles I. He inherited Brough Hall and St. Anthony by act of Parliament 1653. His estate was sequestered. He went into exile to Ireland where his younger son, John Roger, married and settled. Charles II created John Baronet in 1665 and restored the estate of Brough Hall to him. Will dated 22 October proved 4 November 1698. Died 26 October 1698, buried at Catteryck. He was succeeded by Sir Henry Lawson, his eldest son.

Notes for CATHERINE HOWARD:

Third daughter of Sir William Howard, Hawthorn Castle County, Cumberland. Her brother Charles Howard was first Earle of Carlisle.

Children of JOHN LAWSON and CATHERINE HOWARD are:

24. i. HENRY 17 LAWSON, d. May 09, 1726.

25. ii. JOHN ROGER LAWSON, b. 1651, England d. Ulster County, Ireland.

iii. CHARLES LAWSON, d. 1694.

Notes for CHARLES LAWSON:

Charles Lawson Esquire accompanied his brothers, John and Henry to France in 1664, with their uncle and guardian, Francis Lawson. Was a Captain in the Duke of Monmouth’s regiment and was slain in Germany 1694 s.p.

iv. WILLIAM LAWSON.

Notes for WILLIAM LAWSON:

William of whom hereafter in whose issue the Baronetcy became vested on the death of Sir Henry Lawson, 6th Bart. in 1834.

v. RALPH LAWSON.

Notes for RALPH LAWSON:

Died in infancy.

vi. PHILIP LAWSON, m. ANNA MARIA KNOWLES d. 1692.

Notes for PHILIP LAWSON:

1st Earl of Banbury

vii. THOMAS LAWSON, b. December 08, 1666 d. December 18, 1750.

Notes for THOMAS LAWSON:

Thomas Lawson, a priest, SJ. born at Burgh Hall 8 December 1666 entered the Society of Jesus at Watten when 18 years old, professed in 1702 was Chaplain at Burgh and for some time confessor to James III, the son of the exiled King, the "Old Pretender, father of Bonnie Prince Charlie". In 1721 he was declared Rector of Watten and Master of Novices and in 1724 ----- of the English Province, but during May of that year he resigned the office in order to be Chaplain to the Duchess of Norfolk (at her special request), was at

Castle Howard Co. Yorks. In 1728 was Executor with Robert Goodall to his brother William Lawson Esquire Will. On New Years Day 1734 he was again appointed Rector of Watten and Master of Novices and so remained until September 1740 when he was succeeded by Father John Bodenham. In 1741 he was made Confessor and Spiritual Father of St. Omers and died there 18 Decmeber 1750, aged 84 years.

22. ROWLAND 17 LAWSON III (ROWLAND 16 , ROWLAND 15 , JOHN 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) died 1717. He married JANE GLASCOCK. She was born 1673, and died 1738.

Notes for ROWLAND LAWSON III:

Will Probated in Lancaster County, VA January 17, 1717.

Children of ROWLAND LAWSON and JANE GLASCOCK are:

i. THOMAS 18 LAWSON.

26. ii. JOHN LAWSON, d. Abt. 1761.

iii. ANTHONY LAWSON.

iv. SARAH LAWSON.

v. JOANNA LAWSON, m. ADOCK HOBSON.

vi. ELIZABETH LAWSON, m. ROBERT PAYNE.

vii. ROWLAND LAWSON IV.

23. HENRY 17 LAWSON (ROWLAND 16 , ROWLAND 15 , JOHN 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) died 1716. He married MARY SALLARD.

Child of HENRY LAWSON and MARY SALLARD is:

24. HENRY 17 LAWSON (JOHN 16 , HENRY 15 , ROGER 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) died May 09, 1726. He married ELIZABETH KNIGHTLEY 1688, daughter of ROBERT KNIGHTLEY. She died 1735.

Eldest son of Sir John Lawson.

Children of HENRY LAWSON and ELIZABETH KNIGHTLEY are:

i. ANNE 18 LAWSON, m. WILLIAM WITHAM.

ii. ELIZABETH LAWSON, m. STEPHEN TEMPEST.

iii. JOHN LAWSON, b. 1689 m. MARY SHELLY, 1712.

25. JOHN ROGER 17 LAWSON (JOHN 16 , HENRY 15 , ROGER 14 , RALPH 13 , EDMUND 12 , JAMES 11 , WILLIAM 10 , ROBERT 9 , THOMAS 8 , WILLIAM 7 , JOHN 6 , JOHN 5 , THOMAS 4 , ROBERT 3 , RALPH 2 LAWESSON, THOMAS 1 ) was born 1651 in England, and died in Ulster County, Ireland. He married MARY MCCONNELL, daughter of HUGH MCCONNELL and CALDWELL. She was born 1578 in Ulster County, Ireland.

Notes for JOHN ROGER LAWSON:

Traveled to the Holy Land. His marriage to a Protestant estranged him from his family.

Daughter of Hugh McConnell. Mary's parents were related to Cromwell and the marriage estranged John Roger Lawson from his relatives in England.

Children of JOHN LAWSON and MARY MCCONNELL are:

28. iii. HUGH LAWSON, b. 1705, Ulster Co. Ireland d. 1772, Rowan Co., NC.


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